(close)
Find hotels near Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

Interesting places in Ulysses S. Grant Memorial:
Artillery Group   Cavalry Group

The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial is a United States Presidential Memorial in Washington, D.C., honoring American Civil War General and President of the United States Ulysses S. Grant. It is located at the base of Capitol Hill (Union Square, the Mall, 1st Street, between Pennsylvania Avenue and Maryland Avenue), and like the United States Capitol above it (at the top of the hill), the monument's statue faces west, looking towards the Washington Monument and overlooking the National Mall. It is the largest equestrian statue in the United States and the second largest in the world, after the monument to Italy's King Victor Emanuel in Rome.

Location is derived from the great work of WikiMapia

Top photos chosen by u all:

Washington DC - Capitol Hill: General Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

Washington DC - Capitol Hill: General Ulysses S. Grant Memorial
Made by wallyg
The General Ulysses S. Grant Memorial, located at the base of Capitol Hill below the west front of the United States Capitol and east of the National Mall, was installed over a period from 1912-1920 and officially dedicated on April 27, 1922. The memorial, created by sculptor Henry Merwin Shrady, assisted by sculptor Edmund Amateis, and architect William Pearce Casey, consists of of a long marble platform with an equestrian statue of General Grant in the center, and two groups of military figures--the Artillery Group on the south end, and the Cavalry Group on the north end. Shrady, who spent 20 years of his life working on the memorial, died two weeks before its dedication. General Grant, in the center of the 252-foot long by 71-foot wide Vermont marble platform, faces west toward the Lincoln Memorial, honoring his war-time president. The 17-foot-2-inch, 10,700-piund statue, dressed in his military uniform and slouch hat, and seated astride his charger, Cincinnatus, is the second largest equestrian statue in the United States, and third in the world. On each side of the 22½-foot marble base is a large bas-relief panel depicting soldiers in action. Each of the four corners of the base is dotted with a bronze lion in repose guarding both the United States flag and the flags of the Army. The Union Cavalry Group depicts seven horsemen of the Cavalry Regiment's color squad making a charge, fronted by their commanding officer. The Union Artillery Group depicts three horses pulling a caisson carrying a cannon and three soldiers. A plague on the rear of the Artillery Group lists the names: Fairfax Ayers, James E. Chaney, and Henry J. Weeks (the West Point cadets who were the models). At completion, it was the largest bronze sculpture cast in the United States. Today it stands as part of a three-part sculptural group including the James A. Garfield Monument and the Peace Monument. The idea for the memorial originated in 1895 by the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, Grant's old command. The location on the east side of the mall was chosen when Theodore Roosevelt reportedly vetoed the original location of the Ellipse, since it would block his view of the Potomac. Excavation on the site began on October 7, 1907. The sculpture of Grant was installed in late 1920, the Artillery Group was placed on the site in 1912 and the Cavalry Group in 1916. The two reliefs on the base were sculpted by Fry and Amateis from a sketch done by Shrady shortly before his death and were installed after 1922.

The Cavalry Group of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

The Cavalry Group of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial
Made by kimberlyfaye
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Henry Merwin Shrady, Edmond Amateis, Sherry Edmundson Fry Ulysses S. Grant, born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). He achieved international fame as the leading Union general in the American Civil War. Grant first reached national prominence by taking Forts Henry and Donelson in 1862 in the first Union victories of the war. The following year, his brilliant campaign ending in the surrender of Vicksburg secured Union control of the Mississippi and -- with the simultaneous Union victory at Gettysburg -- turned the tide of the war in the North's favor. Named commanding general of the Federal armies in 1864, he implemented a coordinated strategy of simultaneous attacks aimed at destroying the South's ability to carry on the war. In 1865, after conducting a costly war of attrition in the East, he accepted the surrender of his Confederate opponent Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House. Grant has been described by J.F.C. Fuller as the greatest general of his age and one of the greatest strategists of any age. His Vicksburg Campaign in particular has been scrutinized by military specialists around the world. The memorial consists of a long marble platform with an equestrian statue of General Grant; four sculptures of lions, one at each corner of the equestrian statue; and two groups of military figures, one at each end of the marble platform. In the center of the marble platform is the figure of Grant, dressed in his military uniform and slouch hat, seated astride his charger, Cincinnatus. On each side of the base is a large bas-relief panel depicting soldiers in action. On one side, an officer raises his sword and commands his marching soldiers. On the other side, soldiers carrying flags and rifles march in profile. To the north of the Grant equestrian statue is the Cavalry Group which depicts seven horsemen of the Cavalry Regiment's color squad making a charge. The commanding officer is at the front with his sword raised giving the order to charge. To the south of the Grant equestrian statue is the Artillery Group which depicts three horses pulling a caisson carrying a cannon and three soldiers. Notes for group. Submitted for Monthly Scavenger Hunt - MSH0508-10 Scared.

Day 350/365 - Chaaarge!

Day 350/365 - Chaaarge!
Made by Kevin H.
Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns! he said: Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. Forward, the Light Brigade! Was there a man dismay'd? Not tho' the soldier knew Someone had blunder'd: Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die: Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them Volley'd and thunder'd; Storm'd at with shot and shell, Boldly they rode and well, Into the jaws of Death, Into the mouth of Hell Rode the six hundred. Flash'd all their sabres bare, Flash'd as they turn'd in air, Sabring the gunners there, Charging an army, while All the world wonder'd: Plunged in the battery-smoke Right thro' the line they broke; Cossack and Russian Reel'd from the sabre stroke Shatter'd and sunder'd. Then they rode back, but not Not the six hundred. Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon behind them Volley'd and thunder'd; Storm'd at with shot and shell, While horse and hero fell, They that had fought so well Came thro' the jaws of Death Back from the mouth of Hell, All that was left of them, Left of six hundred. When can their glory fade? O the wild charge they made! All the world wondered. Honor the charge they made, Honor the Light Brigade, Noble six hundred. Alfred, Lord Tennyson The Charge of the Light Brigade 1870 (September 23, 2009)

United States Capitol

United States Capitol
Made by anadelmann
The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. It is located in Washington, D.C., on top of Capitol Hill at the east end of the National Mall. The building was originally designed by William Thornton. This plan was subsequently modified by Stephen Hallet, Benjamin Latrobe and then Charles Bulfinch. The current dome and the House and Senate wings were designed by Thomas U. Walter and August Schoenborn, and were completed under the supervision of Edward Clark. The building is marked by its central dome above a rotunda and two wings, one for each chamber of Congress: the north wing is the Senate chamber and the south wing is the House of Representatives chamber. It is an example of the Neoclassical architecture style. The statue on top of the dome is the Statue of Freedom. From: wikipedia (This picture: 02APR2007)

Ulysses S. Grant Memorial - Artillery group detail

Ulysses S. Grant Memorial - Artillery group detail
Made by Gordon Calder
The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C., honoring American Civil War general and U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant. It is located at the base of Capitol Hill (Union Square, the Mall, 1st Street, between Pennsylvania Avenue and Maryland Avenue), below the west front of the United States Capitol. The Grant Memorial, begun in 1902 as the largest ever commissioned by Congress at the time, was created by sculptor Henry Merwin Shrady and architect William Pearce Casey. Sculptor Edmund Amateis assisted Shrady as the monument neared completion in 1921. Shrady spent 20 years of his life working on the memorial and died, stressed and overworked, two weeks before its dedication in 1922.

Pretty Please

Pretty Please
Made by M.V. Jantzen
A sign at the entrance to the Grant Memorial. I don't see why they need to ban eating and drinking; this would be a nice spot to sit for a snack. It's not like people are gonna start barbequing. The middle symbol is a new one; I guess it means don't climb. The last one is aimed at a cop's arch-enemy: skateboarders. Some skateboarding tricks can harm surfaces, but merely skateboard riding does not. A ban is unnecessary. Common sense would suggest all that's banned is damaging the memorial. Instead of banning things that might in some circumstances do harm, why not just focus on the simple act of damage. Washington, DC.

Runaway Caisson

Runaway Caisson
Made by jeffmorg
The Artillery Group to the south shows a caisson carrying three artillerymen and pulled by three horses. Astride the horse on the left is the guidon (flag) carrier who is signaling a sharp right wheel. Despite the impending course change the horse on the right is able to continue lunging forward due to a broken strap on the right bridle bit. To the north the Cavalry Group depicts a color squad consisting of seven cavalrymen charging into battle. The horse on the right has fallen and the rider, modeled after Shrady himself, is moments from being trampled by the onrushing horses.

rotunda

rotunda
Made by ken m photography
The United States Capitol is the meeting place of the United States Congress, the legislature of the federal government of the United States. Located in Washington, D.C., it sits atop Capitol Hill at the eastern end of the National Mall. Though not in the geographic center of the District of Columbia, the Capitol is the origin by which the quadrants of the District are divided. Officially, both the east and west sides of the Capitol are referred to as fronts. Historically, however, only the east front of the building was intended for the arrival of visitors and dignitaries.

Westard looking

Westard looking
Made by MNesterpics
Day 303 of 366 Today is one of those days I am glad there is only 63 days left not that I am trying to rush the year but it was a struggle to go out and take a picture today. I wanted to stay home and just chill. I did end up in DC this evening and was hoping the clouds would be broken up like they were in Springfield. The closer I got to DC the thicker they got. I was hoping to get a shot of the Capital Building with some fall colors and a cool sky. Instead I got this statue looking like it is ready to ride off into the sunset.

CITY SIGHTSEEING 327 AP0612 CAPITOL HILL 070909

CITY SIGHTSEEING 327 AP0612 CAPITOL HILL 070909
Made by MrVRman
Ensign franchise out most of their city sightseeing operations, but there are some that are directly owned and operated. The operation in Washington DC is one of these. They use MCW Metrobuses on the services; three loops covering all the major tourist attractions in the national capital. By and large the vehicles were new to London Transport, and all had been used by Ensign on tours in the UK.

US Capitol

US Capitol
Made by Justin in SD
I decided to add two images today to get through some of these DC I was here shots. This one was near the end of our sprint around the national mall. At this point we were already running late for our dinner reservation so I snapped a few brackets and off we went back to the car. This is a 3 exposure HDR processed with Photomatix, Nik Color Efex Pro 4 and Lightroom.

Before the Storm

Before the Storm
Made by TDLphoto
A late summer storm rolls in over the Capital in Washington, DC. To see more Pictures of the Day and other options, please visit: photos.TDLphoto.com/pod Photo by Tim Lundin / Freelance / tim@TDLphoto.com - TDLphoto.com

(118/365)

(118/365)
Made by kimberlyfaye
It was a pretty, albeit windy day in DC so I decided to take the Diana lens and adapter for a spin around the mall at lunch. I took several shots, but this one was my favorite, by far. Check out my photoblog: kimberlyfaye's photos.

Fallen Calvaryman

Fallen Calvaryman
Made by jeffmorg
The Grant Memorial, begun in 1902 as the largest ever commissioned by Congress at the time, was created by sculptor Henry Merwin Shrady and architect William Pearce Casey. Shrady spent 20 years of his life working on the memorial and died, stressed and overworked, two weeks before its dedication in 1922.

US Capital (back)

US Capital (back)
Made by Scott (sfinley_nh)
The back side of the US Capital building. See the Capital web site www.visitthecapitol.gov/ or the US National Park Service web page www.nps.gov/nama/ for the National Mall for more info.

Washington Monument at Night *

Washington Monument at Night *
Made by I-SEEN-IT RubenS
Washington DC Camera:Sony DSLR-A350 Exposure:30 Aperture:f/22.0 Focal Length:50 mm ISO Speed:100 - Follow me on Twitter - Buy my photography art at Imagekind!

Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

Ulysses S. Grant Memorial
Made by sftrajan
Construction began in 1909; the Artillery Group was completed in 1912, the Cavalry Group (here) was completed in 1916, and the bronze figure of Grant was completed in 1920. The memorial was dedicated on the 100th anniversary of Grant's birth, April 27, 1922. HPIM6904

Capitol Building, Christmas 2008

Capitol Building, Christmas 2008
Made by Chris and Kelly B.
My first real attempt with nighttime photography, with just the little old kit lens and a tripod. It's been done, of course, but I think it came out pretty okay. Constructive criticism (on technique, composition, post-processing, anything!) is welcome and appreciated.

Panorama Washington Moument

Panorama Washington Moument
Made by Larry Timmins
Please Let Me Know About / Any misinformation on the Wild Life Postings or any Postings, so that I can Correct it / Thank You All PLEASE NO (Post one picture, and comment on one or more) Groups invites or (LARGE BANNERS) in the comment space. Thank You Larry Timmins



Made by SSDP Photos
photos by Alfred Kilzi Group photo on Capitol Hill during the Students for Sensible Drug Policy Training Conference & Lobby Day Friday, March 18, 2011 Washington, DC www.SchoolsNotPrisons.com/



Nearest places of interest:

Artillery Group
United States Botanic Garden (Conservatory)
Bartholdi Park
Rayburn House Office Building
  Peace Monument
Original Borders of the City of Washington
Cavalry Group
Capitol Reflecting Pool

PanoramioFlickr CC