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Humayun's Mausoleum

Humayun's Mausoleum
Made by bikashdas
Humayun died in 1556, and his widow Hamida Banu Begam, also known as Haji Begam, commenced the construction of his tomb in 1569, fourteen years after his death. It is the first distinct example of proper Mughal style, which was inspired by Persian architecture. It is well known that Humayun picked up the principles of Persian architecture during his exile, and he himself is likely to have planned the tomb, although there is no record to that effect. The tomb was constructed at a cost of 15 lakh rupees (1.5 million). Mirak Mirza Ghiyath, a Persian, was the architect employed by Haji Begam for this tomb. The tomb proper stands in the centre of a square garden, divided into four main parterres by causeways (charbagh), in the centre of which ran shallow water-channels. The high rubble built enclosure is entered through two lofty double-storeyed gateways on the west and south. A baradari (pavilion) occupies the centre of the eastern wall and a hammam (bath chamber) in the centre of northern wall. The square red sandstone double-storeyed structure of the mausoleum with chamfered corners rises from a 7-m. high square terrace, raised over a series of cells, which are accessible through, arches on each side. The grave proper in the centre of this cell-complex is reached by a passage on the south. The octagonal central chamber contains the cenotaph, and the diagonal sides lead to corner-chambers which house the graves of other members of the royal family. Externally each side of the tomb, its elevations decorated by marble borders and panels, is dominated by three arched alcoves, the central one being the highest. Over the roof pillared kiosks are disposed around the high emphatic double dome in the centre. The central octagonal chamber contains the cenotaph, encompassed by octagonal chambers at the diagonals and arched lobbies on the sides. Their openings are closed with perforated screens. Each side is dominated by three arches, the central one being the highest. This plan is repeated on the second storey too. The roof surmounted by a double dome (42.5m) of marble has pillared kiosks (chhatris) placed around it.

0084 Emperor Humayun's Mausoleum - Delhi

0084 Emperor Humayun's Mausoleum - Delhi
Made by Traveling Man 2009
Emperor Humayun's Mausoleum Humayun's tomb is the tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun. The tomb was commissioned by Humayun's wife Hamida Banu Begum in 1562 CE, and designed by Mirak Mirza Ghiyath, a Persian architect. It was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent, and is located in Nizamuddin East, Delhi, India, close to the Dina-panah citadel also known as Purana Qila, that Humayun founded in 1533. It was also the first structure to use red sandstone at such a scale The tomb was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993, and since then has undergone extensive restoration work, which is still underway. Besides the main tomb enclosure of Humayun, several smaller monuments dot the pathway leading up to it, from the main entrance in the West, including one that even pre-dates the main tomb itself, by twenty years; it is the tomb complex of Isa Khan Niyazi, an Afghan noble in Sher Shah Suri's court of the Suri dynasty, who fought against the Mughals, constructed in 1547 CE. The complex encompasses the main tomb of the Emperor Humayun, which houses the graves of his wife, Hamida Begum, and also Dara Shikoh, son of the later Emperor Shah Jahan, as well as numerous other subsequent Mughals, including Emperor Jahandar Shah, Farrukhsiyar, Rafi Ul-Darjat, Rafi Ud-Daulat and Alamgir II. It represented a leap in Mughal architecture, and together with its accomplished Charbagh garden, typical of Persian gardens, but never seen before in India, it set a precedent for subsequent Mughal architecture. It is seen as a clear departure from the fairly modest mausoleum of his father, the first Mughal Emperor, Babur, called Bagh-e Babur (Gardens of Babur) in Kabul (Afghanistan). Though the latter was the first Emperor to start the tradition of being buried in a paradise garden. Modelled on Gur-e Amir, the tomb of his ancestor and Asia's conqueror Timur in Samarkand, it created a precedent for future Mughal architecture of royal mausolea, which reached its zenith with the Taj Mahal, at Agra. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humayun%27s_Tomb

Humayun's Tomb

Humayun's Tomb
Made by Victor Radziun
Humayun's Tomb. Delhi, India. Nasiruddin Humayun (Persian: نصيرالدين همايون) (March 6, 1508 – February 22, 1556), was the second Mughal Emperor who ruled Afghanistan, Pakistan,and the northern parts of India from 1530–1540 and again from 1555–1556. Like his father, Babur, he lost his kingdom early, but with Persian aid, he eventually regained an even larger one. He succeeded his father in India in 1530, while his half-brother Kamran Mirza, who was to become a rather bitter rival, obtained the sovereignty of Kabul and Lahore, the more northern parts of their fathers empire. He originally ascended the throne at the age of 22 and was somewhat inexperienced when he came to power. Humayun lost his Indian territories to the Afghan Sultan, Sher Shah, and only regained them with Persian aid ten years later. Humayun's return from Persia, accompanied by a large retinue of Persian noblemen, signalled an important change in Mughal Court culture, as the Central Asian origins of the dynasty were largely overshadowed by Persian art, architecture, language and literature. Subsequently, in a very short time thereafter, Humayun was able to expand the Empire further, leaving a substantial legacy for his son, Akbar the Great. Humayun's tomb is a complex of buildings of Mughal architecture located in Nizamuddin East, New Delhi. It encompasses the main tomb of the Emperor Humayun as well as numerous others. The complex is a World Heritage Site and the first example of this type of Mughal architecture in India. This style of mausoleum was the same that created the Taj Mahal in Agra. The tomb of Humayun was built by the orders of Hamida Banu Begum, Humayun's widow starting in 1562. The architect of the edifice was reportedly Sayyed Muhammad ibn Mirak Ghiyathuddin and his father Mirak Ghiyathuddin who were brought in from Herat. It took 8 years to build and had a Chahr Bagh Garden style in its design, the first of its kind in the region.

The inspiration for the Taj Mahal

The inspiration for the Taj Mahal
Made by John Kok
Humayun's Tomb in New Delhi in beautiful evening sunlight. Hordes of other tourists were there too of course, including school children. Unlike contemporaneous descriptions, which speak of rich furnishings and artifacts, the interiors now are a little disappointing, as there is nothing left except the stone sarcophagi on the floors in the various rooms. Those and the bare walls. Humayun was the second Mughal Emperor, and Humayun's Tomb was built by his widow. It is said the Taj Mahal is modelled on this, and is about the same size, although of course the Taj is built with marble, while this is built with red sandstone. I suppose a widower Emperor commands more resources than a widowed Empress. The Mughal Empire founded by Babur ruled India (at times stretching all the way north beyond Kabul) for about 300 years from the 1520's (the English word mogul comes from this). Babur was from modern-day Uzbekistan and claimed to be a direct descendant of Timur and Genghis. He kept a journal starting from when he was a young prince, in a language known to him as Turki (small world, eh?), using plain words and was remarkably non-self-serving, unlike some modern-day political memoirs. From a recent (December 2010) article on Babur in the Economist: In a letter to his son Humayun, he complains about the obscurity of the young man’s vocabulary: In future write without elaboration; use plain, clear words. It will be less trouble for you and for the reader.” www.economist.com/node/17723207 Now that's inspiration for me. D3S_9478

Inspirations to Taj Mahal

Inspirations to Taj Mahal
Made by bikashdas
The tomb of Humayun was built by the orders of Hamida Banu Begum, Humayun's widow starting in 1562. The architect of the edifice was reportedly Sayyed Muhammad ibn Mirak Ghiyathuddin and his father Mirak Ghiyathuddin who were brought in from Herat. It took 8 years to build and had a Chahr Bagh Garden style in its design, the first of its kind in the region. There are two high double-storey gateways on the west and south that lead to the enclosure. There is a pavilion in the center of the eastern wall and a bath chamber in the center of the northern wall. To enter the tomb's chamber one has to come through the south entrance while the other three sides are covered with mesh wire in white marble. In the quietude of the central chamber lies the tomb,though the actual resting-place of Humayun is directly beneath in an underground chamber. The lofty mausoleum is in the center of the enclosure and rises from a podium faced with series of cells having arched openings. The central octagonal chamber contains the cenotaph,encompassed by octagonal chambers at the diagonals and arched lobbies on the sides. Their openings are closed with perforated screens. Each side is dominated by three arches,the central one being the highest. This plan is repeated on the second storey too.

Isa Khan's Tomb

Isa Khan's Tomb
Made by bikashdas
Isa Khan's Tomb is situated just outside the Humayun's tomb precincts in New Delhi. It was built in the honor of Isa Khan, a brave and valiant noble under Sher Shah, the Afghan ruler who had overthrown Humayun. It was built in 1547, in an octagonal pattern. It is an architectural gem in the Islamic art in India and remained a model tomb amongst the ruling families in its time. Said to be inspired by the tomb of Sikandar Lodi, which is 300 years older than the Isa Khan tomb, it can boast of having more graceful proportions. The 'chhatris' or small kiosks and pinnacles around the dome that were introduced here look quite elegant.

humayun's Tomb

humayun's Tomb
Made by Paul Cowell
This chamber with high ceiling is then encompassed by four main octagonal chambers on two floors, set at the diagonals with arched lobbies leading to them also connecting them, plus there are four auxiliary chambers in between suggesting that the tomb was built as a dynastic mausoleum. Collectively the concept of eight side chambers not only offers passage for circumambulation of the main cenotaph, a practice common in Sufism and also visible in many Mughal imperial mausoleums, it also the reflect the concept of Paradise in Islamic cosmology. (wiki)

Cornered

Cornered
Made by prayash.giria
Humayun's Tomb, New Delhi. A World Heritage Site, Humayun's Tomb was built in 1562 by the widow of Humayun, the second Mughal emperor. A precursor to the Taj Mahal, the tomb is set in an elaborate square Charbagh (a regular, enclosed garden divided into symmetrical portions, often with planned channels of water). It is thoroughly masculine, with solid red sandstone tempered by elegant geometrical patterns and inlay work, and sits on a high plinth that affords reasonable views of the vicinity. It is one of the city's most spectacular sights.

reflections..... Humayun's Tomb

reflections..... Humayun's Tomb
Made by *Santosh
Humayun's tomb is a complex of buildings of Mughal architecture located in Nizamuddin east, New Delhi. In time of Slave Dynasty this land was under the KiloKheri Fort which was capital of Sultan Kequbad son of Nasiruddin(1268-1287). It encompasses the main tomb of the Emperor Humayun as well as numerous others. The complex is a World Heritage Site and the first example of this type of Mughal architecture in India. This style of mausoleum was the same that created the Taj Mahal in Agra.

Mughal Architecture - Stonework at Humayun's Tomb

Mughal Architecture - Stonework at Humayun's Tomb
Made by Rockbaaz
This stonework lattice is situated at the Tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun. This tomb is the first garden-tomb in the Indian sub-continent built by Humayun's wife Hamida Banu Begum in 1562 CE and designed by Mirak Mirza Ghiyath, a Persian architect. The tomb is the largest of its kind built with red sandstone. Situated just outside the walled city of Delhi, the tomb has now been engulfed by the city of New Delhi

Entrance gate to Emperor Humayun's Tomb (Built between 1565-72) in Delhi, India.

Entrance gate to Emperor Humayun's Tomb (Built between 1565-72) in Delhi, India.
Made by Aksveer
Hamida Banu Begum, his grieving widow, built Emperor Humayun's mausoleum. Precursor to the Taj Mahal, it stands on a platform of 12000 sq mt. and reaches a height of 47m. The earliest example of Persian influence in Indian architecture, the tomb has within it over a 100 graves, earning it the name, 'Dormitory of the Moghuls'.

It's just you, not the lines...

It's just you, not the lines...
Made by itshodgepodge
Darare Darare hai maathe pe Maula! Marramat Muqaddar ki karde Maula! I wish, but.. “Destiny is no matter of a chance, as it is that of a choice; It is not a thing to be waited for, but is something to be achieved” Taken with a Canon Rebel XS + 50mm f1.8 on a Kodak 100ASA.

Humayun Mihrab

Humayun Mihrab
Made by Paul Cowell
A mihrab (Arabic: محراب pl. محاريب‎) is a niche in the wall of a mosque that indicates the qibla, that is, the direction of the Kaaba in Mecca and hence the direction that Muslims should face when praying. The wall in which a mihrab appears is thus the qibla wall.

Humayun's Tomb

Humayun's Tomb
Made by The Outsider
This is Humayun's tomb. However, the tomb here has within it over 100 graves earning it the name 'Dormitory of the Mughals'. Hamida Banu Begum, his grieving widow built the Emperor's mausolem. The architecture of the building is very similar to that of the Taj Mahal.

Nai-Ka-Gumbad - Barber's Tomb

Nai-Ka-Gumbad - Barber's Tomb
Made by bikashdas
Located on the southwestern side of the Humayun' tomb is Barber's tomb (Nai-ka-Gumbad) which stands on a raised platform, reached by seven steps from the south. The building is square on plan and consists of a single compartment covered with a double-dome.

Monumental reflections

Monumental reflections
Made by sabarishr
Humayun's Tomb in Delhi is seen reflected in one of the culverts surrounding this beautiful monument which inspired the design of the Taj Mahal More: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humayun's_Tomb

New Delhi - Ceiling Circle

New Delhi - Ceiling Circle
Made by blackpuddinonnabike
Humayun's Tomb was built for the second Mughal emperor, a number of years before the Taj Mahal came to fruition Humayun's Tomb was built for the second Mughal emperor, a number of years and three emperors before the Taj Mahal came to fruition.

The Chosen One!

The Chosen One!
Made by itshodgepodge
This one's for Andy!! Finally, he made it to the NID, that too in his trademark style! Now, sit back and enjoy till the a** is on fire again! I love film! Taken with a Canon Rebel XS + 50mm f1.8 on a Kodak 100ASA.

Humayun's Tomb

Humayun's Tomb
Made by Kanikoski
The first day of the tour, and already the guides are building us up to the advertised climax. Humayun's Tomb was a precursor to the Taj Mahal, apparently. And there stands charnel doze (eyes closed, never mind).

Humayun's Tomb at night

Humayun's Tomb at night
Made by faiz tajuddin
This is a single shot of the tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun, taken at night in New Delhi in early 2010, with a 40d, using a sigma 10-22 wide angle lens and the camera bag to stabilize the long exposure shot.



Nearest places of interest:

CHAKCHILA
round about near police station nizamuddin west
Bharat Scouts & Guide Trining Centre
Bada Batashaa
  Ashwini Mess (Nizamuddin)
Railway tracks
Sundar Burj
DPS Principle's Residence

PanoramioFlickr CC