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Shakespeare Cliff

the Shakespeare Cliff is part of British Entrance to Channel Tunnel , Channel Tunnel .

Location is derived from the great work of WikiMapia

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Shakespeare Halt Station

Shakespeare Halt Station
Made by Jelltex
This curious set of platforms appear to be an SE&CR creation, probably dating from 1908, when the company opened a number of wooden halts along its network. Situated just beyond the western portal of Shakespeare Tunnel, its raison d'ĂȘtre was to provide an alighting point for workers of the adjacent Dover (or, ''Shakespeare'') Colliery. This coal extracting operation was begun in 1896, in the wake of the SER's Channel Tunnel construction attempt. The latter had received Royal Assent in 1881, and although boring subsequently began the following year, the project fell foul to the Government's concern that the tunnel could provide an easy route for invaders from the Continent. Compounding this, the finance for the initiative was also lacking, which put paid to a tunnel under the Channel. Nevertheless, the SER's endeavours had not been totally fruitless, and during the short-lived excavation, coal was discovered. This then gave rise to the aforementioned colliery which, after sinking a trio of shafts, experienced instant problems with flooding - it was seven years until the first significant coal deposits were removed. Although the colliery closed for good in 1915, the halt was retained for rail staff who lived in the nearby railway cottages - the occupants could come by train or, instead, go by foot by utilising a flight of stairs cut out of the chalk cliff face. The stairs were flanked by banisters composed of rail which had formerly been part of the SER's small narrow gauge network at the site, during the short-lived Channel Tunnel project. Shakespeare Halt was also conveniently-positioned for Abbotscliff signal box and siding, these being located just to the west. What the diminutive set of platforms have been used by frequently in the past, however, are railway workers arriving to deal with the frequent landslips along this stretch of line. The most significant of these occurred in December 1915, which saw the route closed beyond the end of the First World War, until August 1919, forcing crucial military traffic to access Dover Marine station by the ''Chatham'' route, via Faversham and the Priory station. The tracks had been pushed 53 yards closer to the English Channel because of the slip! More bad fortune saw another major landslip occur during World War II, in November 1939, but the line was, comparatively, brought into use swiftly, opening again in January of the following year. The halt is one of two which still exists along this line; the second came after the closure of Folkestone East (Junction) station on 6th September 1965. A section of platform, for staff use, was retained in front of the 1962-installed ''power box'', serving the rolling stock sidings which were still in use beside the junction with the Folkestone Harbour branch. A third, which officially closed in 1939, was that of ''Folkestone Warren Halt'', which had originally opened to the general public in 1886. It was an SER innovation to attract the public to the dramatic scenery of the area, but with the company receiving legal threats from local landowner Lord Radnor, claiming that trespassing was occurring on his land, the halt merely lasted the Summer season. However, it was later brought into use by the SE&CR in 1908, lasting until the landslip of December 1915. Again, all was not lost, and the Southern Railway revived the halt by reopening a set of platforms at the same site in 1923, only for these to be closed too, as a result of the 1939 landslip www.kentrail.co.uk/shakespeare_cliff_halt.htm

The Newest Piece Of England

The Newest Piece Of England
Made by john47kent
Samphire Hoe,Shakespeare Cliff,Dover,Kent Taken through dense mist from The Admiralty Pier,Dover. Engineers digging The Channel Tunnel Rail Link between England and France had a major problem.What do you do with the 4.9 Million Cubic Metres of chalk marl excavated ? Altogether over 60 schemes were considered.The environmental impact of each were considered. In The 1880's Colonel Beaumont started the first attempt at digging a tunnel between England and France,from Shakespeare Cliff.2024 yards were excavated and suddenly work stopped.Some say it was because he ran out of money,others that The Government at the time thought the tunnel could be used by forces to invade England. A second attempt at Shakespeare Cliffs in The 1970's was halted in 1975 when The Government removed funding for a tunnel. It was decided to reclaim land at Shakespeare Cliffs.A competition was organised to choose a name for this new piece of land.A retired local English teacher won this competition and it was named Samphire Hoe (In days gone bye, Rock Samphire was picked from the cliffs,pickled in brine and sent to London.It was served with meat dishes.A Hoe is a small headland.) In July 1997,about 9 years after the surrounding sea wall was completed,Samphire Hoe was opened to the public

1980ish: Shakespeare Cliff

1980ish: Shakespeare Cliff
Made by Late Red
Taken from a passing 4-VEP unit on the Down Line (with a Class 73 electro-diesel loco just visible emerging from the western portal of Shakespeare Tunnel), this is how what is now Samphire Hoe Nature Reserve looked in 1980 or thereabouts. *** For the 1990-ish view see the photo posted before this one *** The sidings on the right of the view are Shakespeare Cliff Sidings, which saw some use in 1973-1974 for preliminary work for construction of a Channel Tunnel - this was subsequently abandoned after the British government withdrew the funding. The first attempt at building a tunnel under the English Channel here was in the 1870s but this attempt was abandoned in 1882. Further tunnelling work in 1890 found a seam of coal and Shakespeare Colliery was thus opened here in 1896, but this had closed by 1921. The South Eastern and Chatham Railway opened a halt here in 1913, and although it was still present when this photo was taken it fell into disuse during the 1990s at completion of the final Channel Tunnel construction project.

1990ish: Shakespeare Cliff

1990ish: Shakespeare Cliff
Made by Late Red
Taken from a passing EMU (maybe a 'Jaffa'-liveried CEP?) on the Up Line, this is how what is now Samphire Hoe Nature Reserve looked in 1990 or thereabouts. *** For the 1980-ish view see the next photo in this photostream *** The sidings on the right of the view are Shakespeare Cliff Sidings, which saw some use in 1973-1974 for preliminary work for construction of a Channel Tunnel - this was subsequently abandoned after the British government withdrew the funding. The first attempt at building a tunnel under the English Channel here was in the 1870s but this attempt was abandoned in 1882. Further tunnelling work in 1890 found a seam of coal and Shakespeare Colliery was thus opened here in 1896, but this had closed by 1921. The South Eastern and Chatham Railway opened a halt here in 1913, and although it was still present when this photo was taken it fell into disuse during the 1990s at completion of the final Channel Tunnel construction project.

Shakespeare Cliff path

Shakespeare Cliff path
Made by Jelltex
The steep path as it heads south out of Dover. In the distance is a man talking loudly on his bluetooth hand set thing. I thought he was mad talking to himself, maybe he was. He was angry, as his girlfriend had changed the locks on their flat. I couldn't but help hear, he was shouting.

2011_07_31_1777. The A20 from Dover climbs westward past Aycliff, and over the top towards Folkestone.

2011_07_31_1777. The A20 from Dover climbs westward past Aycliff, and over the top towards Folkestone.
Made by drypics
On the last roundabout from Dover is a turning to Aycliff and after a mile the footbridge seen here is on the left. A few minutes climb up the slope opposite are fantastic views towards France and a night shot viewpoint from where this was taken ... 30 secs at ISO 100 f4.5

Flint in chalk cliffs

Flint in chalk cliffs
Made by Angus Willson
Samphire Hoe, near Dover, Kent. The horizontal lines of flint are fairly straight which contradicts my point about the 'human' characteristics of lines in the landscape. However, the mystery is that it remains uncertain as how they actually form.

Shakespeare Cliff

Shakespeare Cliff
Made by Tech Owl
Part of the white cliffs of Dover, Shakespeare Cliff, named after after a reference in King Lear by William Shakespeare stands proud with the harbour walls of the busy port in the background

Flat Out!

Flat Out!
Made by zombikombi1959
The Kombi, full chat. Very early in the morning. Foot to the floor after driving through the night to catch the ferry at Dover. We made it by the skin of our teeth and drove right on.

Samphire Hoe, Dover

Samphire Hoe, Dover
Made by Jelltex
Made from the spoil from the Channel Tunnel, now an experiment to see how nature invades virgin land. At the bottom of Shakespeare Cliff, beside the main line from Dover to London.

Dover Admiralty Pier from Samphire Hoe

Dover Admiralty Pier from Samphire Hoe
Made by brianarchie65
The Admiralty Pier, we used as a diving board to dive and jump into the sea, there are landing jetties on the outside of the pier, for ships of a byegone age

Kirsty

Kirsty
Made by AndyWilson
The final, 31st, shot of my July 2011 Portrait-A-Day. Phew. Can't say I'm sorry it's over. Days when I had model shoots were easy. Days when I didn't weren't!

Dover Harbour View

Dover Harbour View
Made by Worthing Wanderer
The sun finally comes out. Note the Seacat parked in the Western Docks. Hoverspeed had just gone out of business when this picture was taken.

Shakespeare Tunnel

Shakespeare Tunnel
Made by Jelltex
Have I posted this before? Will go and check. apparently not, so here it is, taken as waited for Sir Lamiel to arrive back in drizzly April.

Dover rail tunnel Samphire Hoe

Dover rail tunnel Samphire Hoe
Made by brianarchie65
Another playground the path winding down the cliff was used bu us all, the bank in front is man made not there when we were boys...

Fugu by Night

Fugu by Night
Made by Fugunumbmouth
Collaboration between myself and NiDan. Composure and exposure by me. Flashgun work by NiDan and NO PHOTOSHOP!

White Cliffs and A20

White Cliffs and A20
Made by shirokazan
Looking from Shakespeare Cliff towards Folkestone (the harbour wall can be seen jutting out into the Channel).

Starburst at Samphire Hoe

Starburst at Samphire Hoe
Made by Garry Jenkins
31/365 Samphire Hoe, inspired by a wonderful friend who taught me how to create this effect with the sun...

Rope on shoreline

Rope on shoreline
Made by Angus Willson
Jetsum from shipping in the English Channel Looking from near Samphire Hoe west towards Folkestone, Kent

Blue Lighthouse

Blue Lighthouse
Made by Steve's Photography :-)
View On Black



Nearest places of interest:

Channel Tunnel ventilation facility
Samphire Hoe
British Entrance to Channel Tunnel
Channel Tunnel
  Belgrave Pre School (Ex Christ Church) Dover Kent UK
Dover's "Forgotten Fortress" on the Western Heights - HM Immigration Removal Centre
Another entrance to the Channel Tunnel
The SeaFrance Crabble Stadium

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