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San Jacinto Monument

The San Jacinto Monument is a 570 feet (173.7 m) high column topped with a 220 ton star that commemorates the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. The monument, dedicated on April 21, 1939, is the world's tallest monument tower and masonry tower, and is part of the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site, located along the Houston Ship Channel in La Porte, Texas, twenty five miles east of Houston, Texas. The column is an octagonal shaft faced with Texas Cordova shellstone, topped with a 34-foot Lone Star - the symbol of Texas. It is the second tallest monument in the United States; the tallest is the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri.

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San Jacinto Monument - Deer Park, Texas

San Jacinto Monument - Deer Park, Texas
Made by Marc M 2011
Please visit my professional site at mckinneyphotography.zenfolio.com/ The San Jacinto Monument is a 567.31-foot (172.92 m) high column located on the Houston Ship Channel in Harris County, Texas near the city of La Porte. The monument is topped with a 220-ton star that commemorates the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. The monument, constructed between 1936 and 1939 and dedicated on April 21, 1939, is the world's tallest monumental column and is part of the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site. By comparison, the Washington Monument is 555.427 feet (169.294 m) tall. The column is an octagonal shaft faced with Texas Cordova shellstone, topped with a 34-foot (10 m) Lone Star—the symbol of Texas. Visitors can take an elevator to the monument's observation deck for a view of Houston and the USS Texas. The San Jacinto Museum of History is located inside the base of the monument, and focuses on the history of the Battle of San Jacinto and Texas culture and heritage. The San Jacinto Battlefield, of which the monument is a part, was designated a National Historic Landmark on December 19, 1960, and is therefore also automatically listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was designated an Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1992. In 1856, the Texas Veteran's Association began lobbying the state legislature to create a memorial to the men who died during the Texas Revolution. The legislature made no efforts to commemorate the final battle of the revolution until the 1890s, when funds were finally appropriated to purchase the land where the Battle of San Jacinto took place. After a careful survey to determine the boundaries of the original battle site, land was purchased for a new state park east of Houston in 1897. This became San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas began pressuring the legislature to provide an official monument at the site of the Battle of San Jacinto. The chairman of the Texas Centennial Celebrations, Jesse H. Jones, provided an idea for a monument to memorialize all Texans who served during the Texas Revolution. Architect Alfred C. Finn provided the final design, in conjunction with engineer Robert J. Cummins. In March 1936, as part of the Texas Centennial Celebration, ground was broken for the San Jacinto Monument. The project took three years to complete and cost $1.5 million. The funds were provided by both the Texas legislature and the United States Congress. From its opening, the monument has been run by the nonprofit association, the San Jacinto Museum of History Association. In 1966, the monument was placed under the control of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. The Parks Department allows the history association to continue its oversight of the monument. The monument was renovated in 1983. In 1990, the base of the monument was redone to contain the San Jacinto Museum of History and the Jesse H. Jones Theatre for Texas Studies. The exterior of the monument underwent a further renovation in 1995, and the entire structure was renovated from 2004 through 2006.

San Jacinto Monument

San Jacinto Monument
Made by The Rocketeer
In future time, then may the pilgrim's eye see here an obelisk point toward the sky.... — Anonymous poet The above prediction was penned in the poem: “Ode to San Jacinto”, even before the Republic of Texas became the State of Texas. Today, the world’s tallest war memorial stands at San Jacinto—15 feet taller than the Washington monument—honoring all those who fought for Texas's independence. Immediately after the Battle of San Jacinto, the land—then privately owned—commanded respect from all who walked on its soil. The Texas Veterans Association began planning a formal monument, and the state finally received funding to purchase land in the 1890s. After years of pushing by the Sons and Daughters of the Republic of Texas, as well as help from President Roosevelt’s Secretary of Commerce Jesse H. Jones—a prominent Houstonian—its proponents raised enough money to build a fitting monument. And the time was right, with San Jacinto’s 100-year anniversary at hand. The design was the brainchild of architect Alfred C. Finn, engineer Robert J. Cummins, and Jesse H. Jones. Construction ran from 1936 to 1939. With continued support, the San Jacinto Museum Historical Association has occupied the facility since its doors first opened. Its builder was the Warren S. Bellows Construction Company of Dallas and Houston. The monument building alone—apart from its great historical significance—is worth a trip to the San Jacinto Battleground Historical State Park. At 570 feet, this Texas giant one of the finest examples of Moderne (Art Deco) architecture in the United States. The monument has been recognized as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The museum is located in the base of the monument, greeting visitors with bronze doors emblazoned with the six flags of Texas. The base is 125 feet square, with text panels highlighting significant events in history leading up to and resulting from the Texas Revolution. The shaft itself is octagonal, 48 feet at its base, 30 feet at the observation level and 19 square feet at the base of its crowning jewel—a 220-ton star made from stone, steel and concrete. Despite the scale, danger and novelty of the project, not a single life was lost during its construction.

Battleship Texas (BB35)

Battleship Texas (BB35)
Made by The Rocketeer
In 1948, the Battleship TEXAS became the first battleship memorial museum in the U.S. That same year, on the anniversary of Texas Independence, the Texas was presented to the State of Texas and commissioned as the flagship of the Texas Navy. The TEXAS is the last of the battleships, patterned after HMS Dreadnought, that participated in World War (WW) I and II. She was launched on May 18, 1912 from Newport News, Virginia. When the USS TEXAS was commissioned on March 12,1914, she was the most powerful weapon in the world, the most complex product of an industrial nation just beginning to become a force in global events. In 1916, TEXAS became the first U.S. battleship to mount antiaircraft guns and the first to control gunfire with directors and range-keepers, analog forerunners of today's computers. In 1919, TEXAS became the first U.S. battleship to launch an aircraft. In 1925, the TEXAS underwent major modifications. She was converted to oil-fired boilers, tripod masts and a single stack were added to the main deck, and the 5 guns that bristled from her sides were reduced in number and moved to the main deck to minimize problems with heavy weather and high seas. Blisters were also added as protection against torpedo attack. The TEXAS received the first commercial radar in the US Navy in 1939. New antiaircraft batteries, fire control and communication equipment allowed the ship to remain an aging but powerful unit in the US naval fleet. In 1940, Texas was designated flagship of US Atlantic Fleet. The First Marine Division was founded aboard the TEXAS early in 1941. April 21, 1948 the Texas was decommissioned.

Battleship Texas Rededication Special Event

Battleship Texas Rededication Special Event
Made by The Rocketeer
The Battleship TEXAS is the last dreadnought in existence in the world, a veteran of Vera Cruz (1914) and both World Wars, and is credited with the introduction and innovation of advances in gunnery, aviation and radar. Having been designed in the first decade of the 20th century, (keel laid in 1911 and completed in 1914), and having seen action in some of the most intense and critical campaigns of WWII, she is an important piece of our naval and maritime history. The Battleship TEXAS is open for viewing by the public year round 10AM to 5PM (closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day) at the San Jacinto State Historic Site near Houston Texas. Hull Number: BB35 Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. Laid Down: 17 April 1911 Launched: 18 May 1912 Commissioned: 12 March 1914 Length Overall: 573' Max. Beam: (1914) 95' (1927) 106' Normal Draft: (1914) 28' 5 (1927) 28' 6 Diplacement: (1914) 28,000 tons (1927) 34,000 tons Speed: (1914) 21 knots (1927) 20.4 knots) Complement: Crew, 1,625; Officers 100; Marines 84 (peacetime) Main Battery: 10 14inch/45 cal. guns in 5 turrets Range: 12 miles Projectiles: Armor Piercing 1,500 lbs High Explosie 1,275 lbs Full Broadside (Armor Piercing) 15,000 lbs Rate of Fire 1.5 rounds per minute Turret Crew 70 men

Shell Deer Park refinery viewed from the San Jacinto Monument

Shell Deer Park refinery viewed from the San Jacinto Monument
Made by roy.luck
The Houston Ship Channel is home to 25% of the United States' refining capacity. The Deer Park Refinery is the 6th largest in the United States with a capacity of ~350,000 bbl/d. The refinery is a joint venture between Shell and PEMEX of Mexico. NOTE - The Deer Park Shell/PEMEX refinery was the subject of legal action related to reporting (or lack thereof) chemical emissions. I have been contacted on numerous occasions regarding this photo, which shows other companies' facilities in addition to Shell's. As such, it is neither suited for legal nor press usage pertaining to this lawsuit. It is amusing that the litigation typically arises from net energy-consuming states with no refineries who contibute zero to the nation's energy supply (that means you, NY and MA). The Deer Park refinery donated 45,000 gallons of gasoline to local emergency responders during and after Hurricane Ike - in addition to Shell and Motiva pledging $4 million in additional aid. Motiva is Shell's downsteam JV with Saudi ARAMCO; Motiva operates a Port Arthur refinery.

San Jacinto Battlefield- Houston TX 3

San Jacinto Battlefield- Houston TX 3
Made by kevystew
nrhp # 66000815- The Battle of San Jacinto, fought on April 21, 1836, in present-day Harris County, Texas, was the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. Led by General Sam Houston, the Texas Army engaged and defeated General Antonio López de Santa Anna's Mexican forces in a fight that lasted just eighteen minutes. About 700 of the Mexican soldiers were killed and 730 captured, while only nine Texans died.[2] Santa Anna, the President of Mexico, was captured the following day and held as a prisoner of war. Three weeks later, he signed the peace treaties that dictated that the Mexican army leave the region, paving the way for the Republic of Texas to become an independent country. These treaties did not specifically recognize Texas as a sovereign nation, but stipulated that Santa Anna was to lobby for such recognition in Mexico City. Sam Houston became a national celebrity, and the Texans' rallying cries, Remember the Alamo! and Remember Goliad! became etched into American history and legend. from Wikipedia

The San Jacinto Monument

The San Jacinto Monument
Made by mlsnp
The San Jacinto Monument is a 570-foot (173.7 m) high column located in Harris County, Texas, United States, near the cities of La Porte and Baytown. It is topped with a 220-ton star that commemorates the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. The monument, dedicated on April 21, 1939, is the world's tallest monument tower, and masonry tower, and is part of the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site, located along the Houston Ship Channel. The column is an octagonal shaft faced with Texas Cordova shellstone, topped with a 34-foot (10 m) Lone Star - the symbol of Texas. It is the second tallest monument in the United States; the tallest is the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri. As part of the San Jacinto Battlefield, the monument was designated a National Historic Landmark on December 19, 1960, and therefore automatically listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was designated an Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1992.

San Jacinto Monument

San Jacinto Monument
Made by ניקולס
The San Jacinto Monument is a 570-foot (173.7 m) high column located in Harris County, Texas, near the city of La Porte. It is topped with a 220-ton star that commemorates the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle which won the Texas Revolution. The monument, dedicated on April 21, 1939, is the world's tallest monument tower, and masonry tower -- even taller than the Washington Monument. The column is an octagonal shaft faced with Texas Cordova shellstone, topped with a 34-foot (10 m) Lone Star - the symbol of Texas. As part of the San Jacinto Battlefield, the monument was designated a National Historic Landmark on December 19, 1960, and therefore automatically listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was designated an Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1992. For More Info, Read: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_San_Jacinto

040508, 096/366: Daytrip

040508, 096/366: Daytrip
Made by Boots in the Oven
April 5, 2008. 096/366. My brother came down to Houston from Chicago for the weekend, to visit his girlfriend who's attending Rice. We drove in from Austin, and it was a lovely day. His only real request while we were there was to spend some time outside (poor Chicagoan), so we checked out the truly interesting San Jacinto Battlefield Monument. 570 feet tall! It's the tallest monument column in the world. Wooo, Texas! I included my husband and brother for scale. Their backs look impressed, no? www.sanjacinto-museum.org/

San Jacinto Monument

San Jacinto Monument
Made by NixBC
The San Jacinto Monument is a 567.31-foot (172.92 m) high column located on the Houston Ship Channel in Harris County, Texas near the city of La Porte. The monument is topped with a 220-ton star that commemorates the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. The monument, constructed between 1936 and 1939 and dedicated on April 21, 1939, is the world's tallest monumental column and is part of the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site. By comparison, the Washington Monument is 555.427 feet (169.294 m) tall.

Mom at San Jacinto

Mom at San Jacinto
Made by Melissa Maples
My mother, Lilli Maples, at the San Jacinto monument ... June, 1971. I love how everything about the colouring in this photo screams its era. Also, it's very useful how Fox Photo used to put the date directly on the prints - I wish they still did that. I have no idea who took this photo - I'm guessing it's a Polaroid of some sort. I remember in the 70s we had these square pictures, and when they came out of the camera you had to peel a plastic film off the surface of the photos. Is this one of those?

Chalk Bug at the Monument

Chalk Bug at the Monument
Made by spmcfarland
What happens when you let anybody who wants to write anything they want to on your car? Well, if you take it to the VW Bug Bash at the San Jacinto Monument, this happens. It took a little while to get started. At first, people were very hesitant to mark up a car. But before long, the kids were getting into it. Then the kids were really getting into it. By the time I left, the car became an indecipherable mess of scribbles, drawings and notes!

San Jacinto - Monument

San Jacinto - Monument
Made by roger4336
San Jacinto Monument in San Jacinto State Park, east of Houston and near Deer Park. San Jacinto was the site of the battle that secured the independence of Texas from Mexico in 1836. Sam Houston commanded the Texas Republic army. Texas joined the U.S. as the 28th state in 1845. The monument is 570 ft (174 m) high. It is claimed to be the world's tallest memorial column. This photo is geotagged.

San Jacinto - Battleship USS Texas

San Jacinto - Battleship USS Texas
Made by roger4336
The battleship USS Texas (BB-35) entered service with the U.S. Navy in 1914, and saw action in both World Wars. The main armament was ten 14-inch guns, in five turrets. USS Texas was the lead ship in bombardment of Omaha Beach, on D-Day, the Allied invasion of France on June 6, 1944. It is now a museum ship in San Jacinto, Texas, near Houston. I took this photo from the Houston Ship Canal.

True Texas

True Texas
Made by mannedspace
The San Jacinto Monument is an amazing 567.31-foot (172.9 m) high column. There is just something about being a Texan. I've lived here longer than any other state. Pretty dern near all my adult life. Now I'm raising three texans and teaching them to be proud of their state and country. Kinda tough on the country part now-a-days...

San Jacinto Monument 026

San Jacinto Monument 026
Made by RNRobert
Smith and Wesson and Remington revolvers. Closeup of plaque describing pistols can be seen below: farm3.static.flickr.com/2265/2479733629_8156230b08_b.jpg In the museum inside the San Jacinto Monument.

San Jacinto Monument

San Jacinto Monument
Made by Texas Flyer
I was SO close to having an incredible photo here but of course my youngest niece always makes the wrong faces for the moment. The two in the middle are my friend's kids. Go to the Battleship Texas in San Jacinto with your kids if you want to have an awesome fun day!

Monument and Sun (HDR)

Monument and Sun (HDR)
Made by jfahler
Photos taken at San Jacinto Monument - which is a 567-foot monument which observes the Battle of San Jacinto - the decisive conflict in Texas' independence from Mexico. joshintaiwan.com

San Jacinto

San Jacinto
Made by Thorpeland
This is the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte Texas. The 570-foot monument stands in the Guinness Book of World Records as the tallest monument column in the world. Nothing an ultra wide lens can't compress into looking 10 feet tall.

Houston Ship Channel from San Jacinto Monument

Houston Ship Channel from San Jacinto Monument
Made by roy.luck
Busiest harbor in the US in terms of international tonnage. Los Angeles/Long Beach #1 in terms of container traffic (and possibly dollar value), New Orleans #1 in terms of tonnage (but that includes domestic barge traffic).



Nearest places of interest:

VOPAK BATTLEGROUND
Occidental Chemical
Santa Ana's Camp
Peggy Lake
  San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site
Lynchburg Ferry
De Zavala Cemetery
Battleship Texas State Historic Site

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