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Late-Summer Morning at Nijveensterkolk, Hoornsediep, Drenthe, The Netherlands

Late-Summer Morning at Nijveensterkolk, Hoornsediep, Drenthe, The Netherlands
Made by Rana Pipiens
The end of Summer is here, and there was a bit of morning haze as I cycled from Glimmen to Groningen on the west side of the Noord-Willemskanaal and the Hoornsediep. On my left - on the photo straight ahead - is the Paterswoldsemeer. In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries digging began here for peat. Today it's a recreational lake extended recently by a new dugout called the Hoornsemeer. It's to the right - the north - of this picture, and Groningen has expanded to it in such a way that some - perhaps, I would hope, with a bit of irony - call it 'City on the Lake'. The Hoornsediep was originally part of the little river called the Aa at whose confluence with the Hunze - another stream - to the North Sea in ancient times our City was born. In the nineteenth century a commercial agency decided to improve the prospects of shipping between Assen - the capital of Drenthe - and its hinterland and Groningen. They dug the Noord-Willemskanaal (1858) which remained in private hands until 1958, when it became public. Today it has a capacity for ships of about 300 tonnage. This photo pictures a windmill called 'De Helper', built close by at Helpman, now a town suburb, in 1863. It was derelict and of no use by 1969, and then taken down, but rebuilt and restored at this place on the edge of the lake in 1971. It's a pleasant sight for those taking the air on sailing boats which pass from the shady Hoornsediep through this little lock into the brightness and the open waters of the Paterswoldsemeer. Nijveensterkolk - the name of this lock - was built on the instructions of a nineteenth-century Groningen maecenas, Willem Albert Scholten (1819-1892), famous industrialist and well-doer in these parts. He had a special liking for parks and landscape, and he gladly financed projects of that kind. The 'kanaal' was named for his contemporary, King William III (1817-1890). I cycled on vaguely contemplating the Franciscan sisters of the convent of Maria ten Hoorn - yes! think 'Hoornsediep' - whose late-medieval house established in the first half of the fifteenth century had waned and was abandoned by the middle of the sixteenth. Thus Summer makes way for Autumn and Winter.

Where Ladies Once Walked. Persicaria maculosa, Lady's Thumb or Virgin Mary's Pinch, Hoornsedijk, Groningen, The Netherlands

Where Ladies Once Walked. Persicaria maculosa, Lady's Thumb or Virgin Mary's Pinch, Hoornsedijk, Groningen, The Netherlands
Made by Rana Pipiens
A southern suburb of the city of Groningen is Corpus den Hoorn. It was named for a convent of Third Order Franciscan Sisters: Maria ten Hoorn. That small cloister had been built on a section of land called a 'horn' sometime in the middle of the fifteenth century as an outpost of Maria in Campis at Assen, about 30 kms south of Groningen. Also derived from this name is 'Hoornsedijk' - the name of the western levee of what was once the Drentsche Aa, one of two small rivers feeding into the harbors of the city of Groningen. Corpus den Hoorn touches on a large nature reserve and park which includes the Hoornsedijk, the Hoornsemeer, and the Paterswoldsemeer with the Friescheveenseplassen. Wonderful place to walk, and to sail, to cycle and run and swim and sun; and especially to enjoy fresh air and nature's beauty in every season. No doubt the convent sisters - though there weren't many of them - walked through this area between their convents. I was reminded of them when I stooped to look at Persicaria maculosa. Clearly defined in the middle of each willowleaf- or peachleaf-shaped Persicaria leaf is a grey-purple spot, one of the distinguishing marks of our plant. Shaped as if the leaf has been pinched, presumably if we believe the name: between a lady's delicate finger and her thumb. Hence one of Persicaria maculosa's (the specific epithet is for 'bruised') names is Lady's Thumb or even Virgin Mary's Pinch. Other names are Knotweed, Redknot, Redshank, and many more. The convent had already been abandoned by the middle of the sixteenth century even before the city of Groningen became a protestant town... But I wouldn't be surprised if when the mists rise up in the evening out of the peaty Hoornsemeer apparitions move along the Hoornsedijk of leaf-pinching sisters.

Red Campion and a Calling Cuckoo.  Silene dioica, Hoornseplas, Groningen, The Netherlands

Red Campion and a Calling Cuckoo. Silene dioica, Hoornseplas, Groningen, The Netherlands
Made by Rana Pipiens
't Was a bright late morning when anomalously for that particular time I heard a calling Cuckoo as my eyes fell on a gathering of Red Campions in the mottled shade at the edge of a wood near the Hoornseplas, just south of the city of Groningen. This plant in Dutch is usually called the 'Dagkoekoeksbloem' (Silene dioica or Lychnis dioica) as sometimes in English: Cuckoo-flower (which is not the same as the Cuckooflower [Cardamine pratensis]). The great Carolus Linnaeus in the middle of the eighteenth century knew it as Lychnis dioica. Earlier, famous Flemish botanist Rembertus Dodonaeus (1517-1585) had called it Lychnis silvestris in Latin and also by two intriguing Flemish names: Jenettekens ('wee Janets) and Wilde Christusogen ('wild eyes of Christ'). Local Groningen professor of botany, Abraham Munting (1626-1683) added: Wilde Jenette (='Wild Janet'). But the French-Swiss botanist and entomologist Joseph Philippe de Clairville (1742-1830) gave our flower its scientific name 'Silene', which holds today. Possibly by that name he refers to the froth or spittle often seen early in the morning on the stems of Campions and 'True' Cuckooflowers. Greek Silenos - father of Bacchus - was a notorius drunk and often apparently foamed at the mouth. In fact, that froth is the product of the Spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius); how Clairville would have liked this! In pre-modern times this foam was thought to be produced by the Cuckoo; hence it was called 'cuckoospit' (in Dutch: koekoekspuug). That close association with the bird, gave the flower its common name in Dutch. The English 'Campion' is a version - perhaps by way of the French - of the Latin 'Flos campi', Flower of the field, in this case in red or pink.

Cockscomb Leaves. Rhinanthus angustifolius, Greater Yellow-rattle, Hoornseplas, Groningen, The Netherlands

Cockscomb Leaves. Rhinanthus angustifolius, Greater Yellow-rattle, Hoornseplas, Groningen, The Netherlands
Made by Rana Pipiens
It was gray the other day when I cycled here near the Hoornseplas; but walking a bit, too, I was delighted by the light of the golden patches in the grass near a little fen with croaking frogs: Yellow-rattle abuzz with Bumblebees. But the light was not good for photographing yellow. So between some chores, I came again this morning. The sky was high and blue with great cumulus clouds, and the light just right. In 1806 Carl Christian Gmelin (1762-1837) (not to be confused with another contemporary botanist Johann Friedrich Gmelin [1748-1804]) gave the first full, scientific description of our plant under the name Rhinanthus angustifolius, 'Nose-flower with narrow leaves'. Earlier Rembertus Dodonaeus (1517-1585) in his standard Cruijdeboeck gave 'Ratelen' (= Rattle) as one of its names and he remarks that it has no special medicinal qualities. Then there is, of course, my Groningen botanist friend Abraham Munting (1626-1683). He departs from many others in giving it his preferred name 'Wilde Haanekam' (Wild Cockscomb). That term refers to the Greco-Latin word 'Alectorolophus', another ancient name for our plant. Literally, it, too, means 'Cockscomb'. The reference is not to the shape of the flower but to the 'cockscomb' shape of the leaves (see photo). Munting adds that if you boil the black seeds in rosewater, that infusion will soothe smarting eyes (if you stare at a PC-screeen long enough it might bear trying!). Munting also remarks: 'De Hoenderen te eeten gegeeven, maakt haar zeer moedig om te vegten'. In other words: good for a fighting spirit in fowl! That reminded me of the 'play-chicken game' of the leaders of the EU these days over Greek debt.

Stalking on Yellow. Frogbite and Cross Spider, Hypochaeris radicata with Araneus diadematus, Hoornsedijk, Groningen, The Netherlands

Stalking on Yellow. Frogbite and Cross Spider, Hypochaeris radicata with Araneus diadematus, Hoornsedijk, Groningen, The Netherlands
Made by Rana Pipiens
Only the stalks of Hogweed were dry-beige in the lush green fields between the Hoornsedijk and the Paterswoldsemeer. The Summer's apparently been very wet and dark. Large stands of Impatiens glandulifera trembled pink and red in the shade of the trees lining the meanders of the Hoornsediep. The fields, wet underfoot, are awash with a variety of wildflowers and late-flowering grasses. Lots of Frogbite or Swine's Succory or Pigweed. I'd expected more bees; but there were hordes of foraging hoverflies (Episyrphus balteatus and especially Helophilus pendulus). Many other insects, too. And Spiders... Here's a Cross Spider - Araneus diadematus - prancing or maybe stalking prey on the marvellous yellow of Frogbite's flower - Hypochairis radicata. Don't ask me why the Latin transcription of the Greek χοῖρος (swine, pig, hog) in our plant's official name has become 'Chaeris'; I'd have expected 'Choeris' from the rules of transcription. The Great Linnaeus himself caused this confusion by using both spellings... Maybe I'll delve into this problem sometime later. 'Radicata' alludes to the fact that the leaves of Frogbite emanate directly from the roots; the stems are leafless. Well, now off for a walk even though it's threatening rain.

I've been tagged

I've been tagged
Made by gridsi
...by . So here are 16 random things about me (in no particular order). 1. I actually wanted to become a chef (I still like to cook!) 2. Right now, my favourite coffee is a Latte Macchiato 3. My skin can't handle winter cold or sun 4. I only like chocolate bars, no chocolate mousse, chocolate cake, chocolate icecream etc. 5. I hate that I immediatly start blushing 6. I like to edit texts with a red pen 7. Untill a few years ago I never wore open shoes because I didn't like my feet 8. My favourite store is the Hema 9. I'm kind of a controllfreak but I think I know how to hide it quite well 10. I'm hardly ever at home 11. Some things that make me happy: flowers, hot showers, Ben & Jerry's Cookie Dough, coffee, springtime, cheesecake (from Dean & Deluca) 12. I expect people to reply my text messages as fast as me, but they (almost) never do 13. When I'm abroad, I like to visit drugstores (especially the ones in the USA) 14. I'd like to know how to fix a car 15. I'm very good at sending postcards for any occasion but I don't like sending Christmas cards 16. One of my favourite things to do is to watch movies at the theater

Planet Wall House

Planet Wall House
Made by Frenklin
Een Little-Planet van het Wall House #2 in Groningen. Het gebouw is ontworpen door de Amerikaanse architect John Hejduk en na zijn dood in 2000 gebouwd aan de westzijde van het Hoornse Meer. Een 18mx14m grote muur staat centraal in dit gebouw waar, van boven naar beneden, de woonkamer, keuken en eetkamer en de slaapkamer tegenaan zijn geplaatst. 8mm | ISO100 | f/10 | 1/200sec (10x) _______________________________________________________________________________ English: The Wall House #2 in the city of Groningen, the Netherlands. This building is designed by the American architect John Hejduk and was constructed after his death in 2000. 8mm | ISO100 | f/10 | 1/200sec (10x)

4/52 | Explored #58

4/52 | Explored #58
Made by Kyrivia
Week 4 This week was great! Friday we went to an outdoor theater which showed us The Two Gentlemen of Verona by Shakespeare. Every year they perform a play of Shakespeare and I've been there before. This year it was very good, laughed a lot! :) Saturday we went to an medieval festival which was a lot of fun with friends. Sunday I went to see my parents again and they were babysitting on my twin niece (6 months old) so I could cuddle them as well! Then monday I had a day for myself, just reading and relaxing. Tuesday I went to town with a friend and today I made my weekly photo. TRP - On the Map TOTW - How Poetic Inspired by this poem: Look back on Time, with kindly eyes He doubtless did his best How softly sinks that trembling sun In Human Nature's West ~Emily Dickinson

Windmill

Windmill
Made by Giuseppe Labanca
At Paterswolde Meer, Groningen - Holland. (HDR) Questo mulino a vento (1863), ottagonale, è stato costruito da P. Medendorp da Zuidlaren. Le pale raggiungono i 19,5 metri di altezza. Primo proprietario fu il polder di bordo di Helpman. Il primo posto del mulino era en Noord-canale Willems. Dal 1926, il mulino era di 16 CV. A causa di una cattiva condizione, le pale sono state poi rimosse. Fino al 1956, il mulino ha mantenuto la polder secco, alimentato da un motore. Nel 1969 il mulino è stato tirato giù ed è stato ricostruito sul lato est del lago Paterswoldse Meer da JDMedendorp da Zuidlaren. E 'stata riaperto il 9 settembre 1971 con una festa. Nel 1996-97 il mulino è stato rinnovato da L. Duijn. Si notano sul mulino gufi in legno posizionati li per spaventare gli uccelli.

Paterswoldermeer splash 2 (stereo 3D parallel)

Paterswoldermeer splash 2 (stereo 3D parallel)
Made by BdR76
Cannonball at the Paterswoldermeer, take 2. Stereophoto created with Fuji Finepix Real 3D W1 (stereo 3D parallel) View as Wiggled (3D without glasses)

De Helper at Sunset

De Helper at Sunset
Made by Frenklin
De Helper molen aan het Paterswoldsemeer net voor zonsondergang. Deze poldermolen is in 1863 gebouwd ten zuiden van de stad Groningen en tijdens de aanleg van de A28 rond 1970 verplaatst naar de huidige plek aan de oever van het Paterswoldsemeer. 10mm | ISO100 | f/10 | 1min 30sec | ND110 filter _______________________________________________________________________________ English: Windmill 'De Helper' just before sunset. This windmill is located on the shore of a small lake called the 'Paterswoldsemeer' in Groningen, the Netherlands. 10mm | ISO100 | f/10 | 1min 30sec | ND110 filter

Paterswoldse Meer 7 - koek & zopie

Paterswoldse Meer 7 - koek & zopie
Made by KAPturer
Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer, a lake just South of the city of Groningen in the Netherlands. Hundreds of people are participating in an ice skating tour, over a 10km circuit. This is what's a called a 'koek en zopie', where tired skaters can gorge themselves on hot cocoa, coffee, squash, mulled wine, sausages and traditionally Dutch thick pea soup ('snert') with bits of meat in it. The smell of all this is overwhelming. This picture was taken with a camera suspended from a kite line. More in my photostream.

50 Days #4: Paterswoldsemeer

50 Days #4: Paterswoldsemeer
Made by ReinierTreur
And now for something completely different: the 4th picture in the 50 Days project is not street photography but a landscape. There is no rule in the project that all photos should be street photogaphy or b+w, the only - self-imposed - rule is: publish a picture each day that has been taken that same day, during the last 50 days of the year. Late this afternoon I captured the sky over the Paterswoldsemeer, in the north of The Netherlands.

Paterswoldse Meer 10

Paterswoldse Meer 10
Made by KAPturer
Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer, a lake just South of the city of Groningen in the Netherlands. Hundreds of people are participating in an ice skating tour, over a 10km circuit. The skyline of the city of Groningen can be seen in the background. The blue hut is where they get their cards stamped. This picture was taken with a camera suspended from a kite line. More in my photostream.

The Helper Molen

The Helper Molen
Made by Frenklin
Took this picture some weeks ago while experimenting with ND filters (I used 2 ND8 filters for this picture), too bad the clouds weren't moving fast enough to get the 'real' long exposure effect. It is a picture of the a windmill called the 'Helpermolen' and is located on the shore of a small lake just outside Groningen called the 'Paterswoldsemeer'.

Amazing Paterswoldsemeer

Amazing Paterswoldsemeer
Made by ReinierTreur
Lake Paterswoldsemeer in the north of The Netherlands has been featured recently as one of the most amazing places to experience around the globe by The Cool Hunter. Well, who are we to question that?

Paterswoldse Meer 4

Paterswoldse Meer 4
Made by KAPturer
Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer, a lake just South of the city of Groningen in the Netherlands. Hundreds of people are participating in an ice skating tour, over a 10km circuit. The skyline of the city of Groningen can be seen in the background. This picture was taken with a camera suspended from a kite line. More in my photostream.

Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer

Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer
Made by KAPturer
Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer, a lake just South of the city of Groningen in the Netherlands. It was very busy, with hundreds of skaters on the ice. Nary a parking space was left unfilled. Picture taken with a camera suspended from a kite line (which can be seen in the lower right corner of the image). More in my photostream.

Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer

Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer
Made by KAPturer
Ice skating on Paterswoldse Meer, a lake just South of the city of Groningen in the Netherlands. It was very busy, with hundreds of skaters on the ice. The skyline of the city of Groningen can be seen in the background. There's also . This picture was taken with a camera suspended from a kite line. More in my photostream.

De Helper Molen

De Helper Molen
Made by Frenklin
De Helper molen is in 1863 gebouwd ten zuiden van de stad Groningen en is in 1971 verplaatst naar de huidige plek bij het Paterswoldsemeer. A windmill called 'The Helper' on the shore of the 'Paterswoldsemeer' in Groningen, the Netherlands.



Nearest places of interest:

Neerwold
Jachthaven Zuidwesthoek
Panamakanaal
Camping Mannewiek
  Steerntjesgat
De Fokken
Nauwe Tocht
Eerste Kwartier

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