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Menin Gate

The Menin Gate Memorial at the eastern exit of the town of Ypres (known as "Ieper" in Dutch) in Flanders, Belgium, marks the starting point for one of the main roads out of the town that led Allied soldiers to the front line during World War I. Designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial opened on July 24, 1927 as a monument dedicated to the missing British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the fierce battles around the Ypres Salient area who have no known grave.

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The stark reminder

The stark reminder
Made by Rich007
The Menin Gate, Ypres (Ieper), Belgium, as a freezing winter fog starts to descend. The archway is now a monument dedicated to the missing British and Commonwealth soldiers killed in the fierce First World War battles around this area who have no known grave. Originally, this was merely a gap in Ypres' star-shaped fortifications, designed by Louis XIV's engineer Vauban, which proved pointless in the age of shelling, as the historic town was reduced to rubble. This triumphal arch was designed in 1921 and opened in 1927 in tribute to the 54,896 soldiers who died near here before August 15, 1917 and whose bodies were never found. Their names are incised into vast panels inside. It was chosen to be a memorial as it was the closest gate of the town to fighting, and so Allied troops would have marched past here on their way to battle. Around 90 years ago, one of them would have been my great grandfather, Richard Wheeler (after whom I am named), who was injured and invalided back to Britain soon afterwards. Another would have been the great grandfather of Craig, the friend I was with, who was killed a few miles from here, never knowing that his son - Craig's grandfather - had been born just a couple of days previously. Following the Menin Gate Memorial opening in 1927, the citizens of Ypres wanted to express their gratitude towards those who had given their lives for Belgium's freedom. Thus, every evening at 8pm, buglers from the local fire brigade close the road which passes under the arch and play The Last Post. Except for the occupation by the Germans in World War Two, when the daily ceremony was conducted at Brookwood Military Cemetery in Surrey, England, this has been carried on uninterrupted since July 2nd, 1928. On the very evening that Polish forces liberated Ypres, the ceremony was resumed at the Menin Gate despite the fact that heavy fighting was still taking place in other parts of the town. Even without the family ancestrial link, witnessing The Last Post here was a profoundly moving and contemplative experience. Taken on February 7, 2007. See for an alternative night view of the Menin Gate.

The Menin Gate: The Names

The Menin Gate: The Names
Made by CopperPhoenix
The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres, Belgium dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. Carved on stone panels are the names of 54,896 Commonwealth soldiers who died in the Salient but whose bodies have never been identified or found. On completion of the memorial, it was discovered to be too small to contain all the names as originally planned. An arbitrary cut-off point of 15 August 1917 was chosen and the names of 34,984 UK missing after this date were inscribed on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing instead. The Menin Gate Memorial does not list the names of the missing of New Zealand and Newfoundland soldiers, who are instead honoured on separate memorials. Following the Menin Gate Memorial opening in 1927, the citizens of Ypres wanted to express their gratitude towards those who had given their lives for Belgium's freedom. As such, every evening at 20:00, buglers from the local fire brigade close the road which passes under the Memorial and sound the Last Post. Except for the occupation by the Germans in World War II when the daily ceremony was conducted at Brookwood Military Cemetery, in Surrey, England, this ceremony has been carried on uninterrupted since 2 July 1928. On the very evening that Polish forces liberated Ypres in the Second World War, the ceremony was resumed at the Menin Gate despite the fact that heavy fighting was still taking place in other parts of the town. The ceremony is a solemn occasion, and therefore not intended as entertainment or a tourist attraction. The buglers usually remain at the scene for a short while after the ceremony, at which point appreciation can be expressed in person; it is not considered appropriate to applaud during, or after, the ceremony.

Respect

Respect
Made by liam_davies
A young boy pays his respect to those honoured on the the Menin Gate, Ypres (known locally as 'Ieper'). The 'Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres, Belgium dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. It was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial was unveiled on 24 July 1927. It is said that at the time, the British wanted the area left in ruins as stark memorial to those who were lost and a reminder of the brutality of war. However, the Belgians wanted to rebuild Ypres. They agreed a compromise, and the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing was built at the entrance to the rebuilt town. The gate commemorates 54,896 of the Allied soldiers lost in the Great War. Many more were lost on both sides.

The Ypres salient, Belgium. Menin Gate, Ypres

The Ypres salient, Belgium. Menin Gate, Ypres
Made by amandabhslater
The architect Sir Reginald Blomfield saw the site of the town gate through which so many troops had passed as the obvious site for a major memorial to the British and Empire troops missing from the battles of Ypres Salient. In July 1927 the monument was officially inaugurated. It was meant to bear the names of all those with no known graves in the Ypres area, but due to a lack of space just under 55,000 are commemorated on this memorial; the remaining 34,000 being on the Tyne Cot memorial wall. Every evening at 8.00pm the traffic is stopped and buglers from the Ypres Fire Brigade play the last post. This has happened every evening since 1928, with the exception of those years in the Second World War, when the town was held by the Germans. On the very night that the German army evacuated the town in 1944 the tradition was restored and has continued ever since.

Neverending Names

Neverending Names
Made by liam_davies
A list of names honouring the dead on the Menin Gate, Ypres (known locally as 'Ieper'). The 'Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres, Belgium dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. It was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial was unveiled on 24 July 1927. It is said that at the time, the British wanted the area left in ruins as stark memorial to those who were lost and a reminder of the brutality of war. However, the Belgians wanted to rebuild Ypres. They agreed a compromise, and the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing was built at the entrance to the rebuilt town. The gate commemorates a total of 54,896 soldiers lost in the Great War.

Menin Gate

Menin Gate
Made by ines saraiva
The Menin Gate «The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres, Belgium dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. The memorial is located at the eastern exit of the town and marks the starting point for one of the main roads out of the town that led Allied soldiers to the front line. Designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial was unveiled on 24 July 1927.» en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menin_Gate Ieper, België, 05/2010

Menenpoort

Menenpoort
Made by M@rkec
Ieper De Menenpoort is in 1927 door de Britten gebouwd aan de oostzijde van Ieper, ter nagedachtenis aan de ongeveer 54.900 soldaten die in de Eerste Wereldoorlog kwamen meevechten en van wie nooit meer iets werd vernomen. Ze sneuvelden op de slagvelden rond Ieper en hun lichamen konden nooit worden teruggevonden of geïdentificeerd. Al hun namen staan gebeiteld in de wanden van de Menenpoort. Het stoffelijk overschot van deze soldaten hebben geen bekend graf en liggen ofwel ergens verloren in de Ieperse velden, ofwel op een oorlogskerkhof rond Ieper, met als vermelding op de grafsteen Only Known Unto God (alleen gekend bij God).

Police at the gate

Police at the gate
Made by Nick J Stone
Belgian style every night 8pm since 1922 I believe, bit of a gap when he ghastly hun stopped it all during the second war. Menin Gate, Ieper, Belgium. I would have taken a photo of the ceremony, but 800 people were all doing that, so I couldn't see through the forest of schoolchildren's arms holding mobile phones. Credit to them, all seemed interested and engaged with the idea, some shed a tear, hugged their friends, kept quiet during the silence. Nice work, but if you could have all been shorter so I could get a shot in without holding my camera above my head (like everyone else) C'est la guerre.

Menenpoort, Ieper

Menenpoort, Ieper
Made by Erf-goed.be
De Menenpoort in Ieper werd in 1927 door de Britten gebouwd ter nagedachtenis van de gesneuvelden uit de Eerste Wereldoorlog. De poort, een ontwerp van Sir Reginald Blomfield, is ingewerkt in de vestinggordel rond de stadskern van Ieper. Het grote poortgebouw met drie doorgangen is geïnspireerd op de klassieke triomfboog. Op 60 panelen aan de binnenkant van het oorlogsgedenkteken zijn zo'n 55.000 namen gebeiteld van soldaten van het Gemenebest van wie het graf nooit werd teruggevonden. Sinds 1929 wordt aan de Menenpoort iedere avond om 20u de 'Last Post' gespeeld. Foto: Tijl Vereenooghe

a monument

a monument
Made by dryasadingo
Reginald Blomfield's triumphal arch, designed in 1921, is the entry to the barrel-vaulted passage for traffic through the mausoleum that honours the Missing, who have no known graves. The patient lion on the top is the lion of Britain but also the lion of Flanders. It was chosen to be a memorial as it was the closest gate of the town to fighting, and so Allied Troops would have marched past on their way to fight. In actual fact most troops passed out of the other gates of Ypres as the Menin Gate was too dangerous due to shellfire.

Ieper: Menin Gate Memorial

Ieper: Menin Gate Memorial
Made by harry_nl
The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. The memorial is located at the eastern exit of the town and marks the starting point for one of the main roads out of the town that led Allied soldiers to the front line. Designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial was unveiled on 24 July 1927 Source: wikipedia.

Endless List Of Names

Endless List Of Names
Made by Aaron Stone.
Taken within Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium. This is on of only a few names on the walls. The walls only hold a few of the names of those that lost their lives in the war. No image can show the full extent of the building as you really have to be their yourself to try to come to terms with the amount of names there really are. I took this with one corner disappearing off into the distance. The distance represents the endless list of all the names on display and for those that carry on not on the wall. A021005549

Menin Gate

Menin Gate
Made by gunnerian
The Menin Gate Memorial at the eastern exit of the town of Ypres in Flanders, Belgium, marks the starting point for one of the main roads out of the town that led Allied soldiers to the front line during World War I. Designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial opened on 24 July 1927 as a monument dedicated to the missing British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the fierce battles around the Ypres Salient area who have no known grave.

Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium

Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium
Made by martin97uk
Designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial was unveiled on 24 July 1927. The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres, Belgium dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. To the armies of the British Empire who stood here from 1914 to 1918 and to those of their dead who have no known grave

Sounding of the last post, Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium

Sounding of the last post, Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium
Made by martin97uk
Designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield and built by the British government, the Menin Gate Memorial was unveiled on 24 July 1927. The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres, Belgium dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. Every evening at 8pm buglers from the local fire brigade sound the last post at the Menin Gate.

Solemn, but Happy

Solemn, but Happy
Made by chapstick32
Bugler, Ieper (Ypres) Belgium. Every night at exactly 8 pm a 'Last Call' is sounded by buglers at the Menin Gate, which is a memorial to British soldiers killed in World War I but never identified or given a proper burial. The only time that the ceremony did not take place was during the German occupation of World War II. The ceremony occurred again the very first night following Allied liberation - September 9, 1944.

The Menen Gate

The Menen Gate
Made by Wy@rt
Ypres, The Menen Gate. The Menen Gate is a 130 foot memorial arch bearing the names of 54,896 British and Commonwealth soldiers. The Gate is actually not large enough for its intended purpose. An additional 34,984 names of those lost after 16th August 1917 are inscribed at the Commonwealth cemetery Tyne Cot at Passchendaele. 89,880 men dissapeared in the Flanders mud, in an area of approximately 25 square miles.

In the morning, and at the going down of the sun, we will remember them

In the morning, and at the going down of the sun, we will remember them
Made by Cryptik
A poppy left between the stone slabs of the Memorial to the Missing, the Menin Gate in Ieper, Belgium. The names of 54.896 missing men from the battles around Ieper are inscribed here, but only up until 1917. The names of over 30.000 others are to be found at the largest British war cemetery in Europe, Tyne Cot, outside Ieper.

Menin Gate Buglers

Menin Gate Buglers
Made by Genuine dabber
Every night at 8.00pm a moving ceremony takes place under the Menin Gate in Leper.For a few moments the noise of traffic ceases and a stillness descends over the memorial. At exactly 20:00 hours up to six members of the regular buglers from the local volunteer Fire Brigade step into the roadway under the memorial arch. They play Last Post, followed by a short silence and then play Reveille.

Antoine Verschoot MBE

Antoine Verschoot MBE
Made by delta23lfb
I believe he has been playing the Last Post at the Menin Gate, Ypres for the past 56 years as a member of the Ypres Fire Brigade and is the Chief Bugler. The traffic is stopped every night, 365 days of the year at 2000 hours for the ceremony. The only times it has not been done was when the Germans occupied the town during the Second World War but it was played the evening that they left!



Nearest places of interest:

Cloth Hall and Belfry
Ypres Rampart CWGC
Menin Road South Military Cemetery
Railway Dugouts Burial Ground
  Ypres Town Cemetery CWGC
La Brique Military Cemeteries No 2
Ypres Reservoir Cemetery
Avalon Automation nv

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