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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument



Interesting places in Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument :
Custer National Cemetery   Last Stand Hill
Indian Memorial   Deep Ravine Trail
Deep Ravine   Keogh's sector
Calhoun hill   Finkle ridge


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Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - Indian Memorial

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - Indian Memorial
Made by *Checco*
If this memorial is to serve its total purpose, it must not only be a tribute to the dead; it must contain a message for the living...power through unity... Enos Poor Bear, Sr., Oglala Lakota Elder Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument near Crow Agency, Montana, commemorates one of America's most significant and famous battles, the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Here on June 25 and 26, 1876, two divergent cultures clashed in a life or death struggle. Four hundred years of struggle between Euro-Americans and Native Americans culminated on this ground. Like a handful of battles in American history, the defeat of 12 companies of Seventh Cavalry by Lakota (Sioux), Cheyenne, and Arapaho warriors rose beyond its military significance to the level of myth. Thousands of books, magazine articles, performances in film and theater, paintings, and other artistic expressions have memorialized Custer's Last Stand. In 1879, the Little Bighorn Battlefield was designated a national cemetery administered by the War Department. In 1881, a memorial was erected on Last Stand Hill, over the mass grave of the Seventh Cavalry soldiers, U.S. Indian Scouts, and other personnel killed in battle. In 1940, jurisdiction of the battlefield was transferred to the National Park Service. These early interpretations were largely mono-cultural, honoring only the U.S. Army's perspective, with headstones marking where each fell. The essential irony of the Battle of the Little Bighorn is that the victors lost their nomadic way of life after their victory. Unlike Custer's command, the fallen Lakota and Cheyenne warriors were removed by their families, and buried in the Native American tradition, in teepees or tree-scaffolds nearby in the Little Bighorn Valley. The story of the battle from the Native American perspective was largely told through the oral tradition. Even so, today, no memorial honors the Native Americans who struggled to preserve and defend their homeland and traditional way of life. Their heroic sacrifice was never formally recognized - until now. In 1991, the U. S. Congress changed the name of the battlefield and ordered the construction of an Indian Memorial. In 1996, the National Park Service - guided by the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Advisory Committee, made up of members from the Indian nations involved in the battle, historians, artists and landscape architects - conducted a national design competition. In 1997 a winning design was selected. Forty Years ago I fought Custer till all were dead. I was then the enemy of the Whitemen. Now I am the friend and brother, living in peace together under the flag of our country. Two Moons, Northern Cheyenne www.nps.gov/libi/indian-memorial-at-little-bighorn.htm

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - The Last Stand Hill.

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - The Last Stand Hill.
Made by *Checco*
Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument preserves the site of the June 25, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn, near Crow Agency, Montana, in the United States. It also serves as a memorial to those who fought in the battle: George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry and a combined Lakota-Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho force. Custer National Cemetery, on the battlefield, is part of the national monument. The first memorial on the site was assembled by Captain George K. Sanderson and the 11th Infantry. They buried soldiers' bodies where they were found and removed animal bones. In his official report dated April 7, 1879, Sanderson wrote: I accordingly built a mound out of cord wood filled in the center with all the horse bones I could find on the field. In the center of the mound I dug a grave and interred all the human bones that could be found, in all, parts of four or five different bodies. This grave was then built up with wood for four feet above ground. The mound is ten feet square and about eleven feet high; is built on the highest point immediately in rear of where Gen’l Custer’s body was found... Lieutenant Charles F. Roe and the 2nd Cavalry built the granite memorial in July 1881 that stands today on the top of Last Stand Hill. They also reinterred soldiers' remains near the new memorial, but left stakes in the ground to mark where they had fallen. In 1890 these stakes were replaced with marble markers. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Bighorn_Battlefield_National...

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - Custer marker stone on the battlefield

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - Custer marker stone on the battlefield
Made by *Checco*
George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 – June 25, 1876) was a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars. Today he is most remembered for a disastrous military engagement known as the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Raised in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in 1858, where he graduated last in his class. However, with the outbreak of the Civil War, all potential officers were needed, and Custer was called to serve with the Union Army. Custer acquired a solid reputation during the Civil War. He fought in the first major engagement, the First Battle of Bull Run. His association with several important officers helped his career, as did his performance as an aggressive commander. Before war's end, Custer was promoted to the temporary rank (brevet) of major general. (At war's end, this was reduced to his permanent rank of captain). At the conclusion of the Appomattox Campaign, in which he and his troops played a decisive role, Custer was on hand at General Robert E. Lee's surrender. After the Civil War, Custer was dispatched to the West to fight in the Indian Wars. The overwhelming defeat in his final battle overshadowed his achievements in the Civil War. Custer was defeated and killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876, fighting against a coalition of Native American tribes in a battle that has come to be popularly known in American history as Custer's Last Stand. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Armstrong_Custer

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - Indians combatants marker stones on the battlefield.

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - Indians combatants marker stones on the battlefield.
Made by *Checco*
Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument preserves the site of the June 25, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn, near Crow Agency, Montana, in the United States. It also serves as a memorial to those who fought in the battle: George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry and a combined Lakota-Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho force. Markers honoring the Indians who fought at Little Big Horn, including Crazy Horse, have been added to those of the U.S. troops. On Memorial Day, 1999, the first of five red granite markers denoting where warriors fell during the battle were placed on the battlefield for Cheyenne warriors Lame White Man and Noisy Walking. The warriors' red speckled granite memorial markers dot the ravines and hillsides just as do the white marble markers representing where soldiers fell. Since then, markers have been added for the Sans Arc Lakota warrior Long Road and the Minniconjou Lakota Dog's Back Bone. On June 25, 2003, an unknown Lakota warrior marker was placed on Wooden Leg Hill, east of Last Stand Hill to honor a warrior who was killed during the battle as witnessed by the Northern Cheyenne warrior Wooden Leg. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Bighorn_Battlefield_National...

Sioux Land

Sioux Land
Made by Rodsflickr
Follow My Twitter twitter.com/rodsflickr Little Big Horn NM, MT, 2007 Note, site of Custers Last Stand. The Battle of the Little Bighorn—also known as Custer's Last Stand, and, in the parlance of the relevant Native Americans, the Battle of Greasy Grass Creek—was an armed engagement between a Lakota-Northern Cheyenne combined force and the 7th Cavalry of the United States Army. It occurred on June 25 and June 26, 1876, near the Little Bighorn River in the eastern Montana Territory, near what is now Crow Agency, MT. The battle was the most famous action of the Indian Wars, and was a remarkable victory for the Lakota and Northern Cheyenne, led by Sitting Bull. The U.S. Seventh Cavalry, including a column of 700 men led by George Armstrong Custer, was defeated. Five of the Seventh's companies were annihilated and Custer himself was killed as were two of his brothers and a brother-in-law. This battle did not inflict the highest number of casualties by Native Americans against U.S. forces. That record was set in 1791 at the Battle of the Wabash with nearly 1000 casualties.

Indian Memorial -- Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (MT)

Indian Memorial -- Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (MT)
Made by Ron Cogswell
Photo: Ron Cogswell, June 2006. The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument near the Crow Agency in Montana commemorates one of America's most significant and famous battles, the Battle of the Little Bighorn. On June 25, 1876, two divergent cultures clashed in a life or death struggle. The Indian Memorial's theme is Peace Through Unity. According to the National Park Service, from a distance the Memorial appears to be an elemental landform, recalling the ancient earthworks found throughout the continent. An integral relationship is established with the 7th Cavalry Monument via an axis which connects the center of each element. Where this axis bisects the earthen enclosure, a weeping wound or cut exists to signify the conflict of the two worlds. Two large adorned wooden posts straddle this gap and form a spirit gate (not for passage of visitors), to welcome the Cavalry dead and to symbolize the mutual understanding of the infinite all the dead possess. This gate also serves as a visible landmark and counterpoint to the 7th Cavalry obelisk.

White Man Runs Him

White Man Runs Him
Made by DC Products
The last survivor among the six Crow scouts was Whiteman Runs Him, also known as Crow-Who-Talks-Gros-Ventre. He has an earlier name, too, “White Buffalo That Turns Around.” His army career was similar to that of the other scouts. He was with Goes Ahead and Hairy Moccasin with the Custer column on the ridge and in the hilltop fight. He made his home in the Lodge Grass area, and it was he who gave up his name when the Rev. Mr. Petzoldt, pioneer Baptist missionary, was adopted into the tribe. A step-grandfather of Joe Medicine Crow and a friend of Brave Bear, Cheyenne warrior who fought in the battle, he was the source of much of Mr. Medicine Crow’s early information on the famous fight. He died on June 2, 1928, and is buried at the Battlefield. From www.custerslaststand.org/source/runshim.html

Little Big Horn, MT

Little Big Horn, MT
Made by Peter Musolino
Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument preserves the site of the June 25, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn, near Crow Agency, Montana. It also serves as a memorial to those who fought in the battle: George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry and a combined Lakota-Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho force. On June 25 and 26, 1876, Lakota Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho warriors joined forces to defeat 12 companies of the U.S. 7th Cavalry at what is now Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in Montana. Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer, one of the most controversial figures in U.S. military history, led the cavalry and was among the 263 soldiers and other army personnel, including Arikara scouts, who were killed as the Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho fought to defend their traditional nomadic way of life.

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument
Made by GingerP43
Last Stand Hill, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Montana, USA. The Battle of the Little Bighorn occurred on June 25, 1876 between Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians against the United States Army. The tribes were fighting to preserve their way of life as nomadic buffalo hunters. The army was carrying out orders to remove the Indians to a reservation. On June 28, 1876, Custer and his men were buried in shallow graves at or near where they fell. The following year some were transferred to cemeteries in the east; Custer was reburied at West Point, NY. In 1881 the rest were reburied in a mass grave around the memorial bearing the names of those killed in the battle. In 1890 the army erected headstone markers across the battlefield, showing where Custer and his men had fallen.

Marcus A. Reno

Marcus A. Reno
Made by DC Products
Custer's second in command. He led the initial charge into the valley against the Indians. The ill-fated charge and hasty retreat led many to blame him for Custer's defeat. Cleared of all charges, the criticism continued, and his friends abandoned him. His wife died and his son moved away. Reno died a friendless, broken man and was buried in a pauper's grave in Washington, D.C. Decendants, among others, led a campaign that eventually cleared his name and, consequently, his body was exhumed and reburied at Custer National Cemetery with full military honors in 1967. He is both the highest ranking officer in the cemetery and the only officer of the 7th Cavalry. -- Paraphrased from the official Custer National Cemetery guide at Little Bighorn National Park

where custer fell

where custer fell
Made by citizensunshine
On the Postlaw Road Trip of 2008. We had traversed most of Montana in a day, and arrived at Little Bighorn National Monument at the end of the day. Unexpectedly, this was probably our favorite of all the national parks and monuments we visited. Rather than confine you in a museum, they provide a guided path that lays out in all its horror the tactical progress of the Battle of Little Bighorn, even as you walk over the hills on which it was fought (and lost). Pictured, the monument to the fallen, erected on the very spot where Gen. Custer breathed his last. Custer was originally buried here, but at the request of his widow, his remains were eventually exhumed and reintered under an even more sizable monument in the graveyard at West Point Military Academy.

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - 7Th Cavalry Horse Cemetery Marker Stone

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument - 7Th Cavalry Horse Cemetery Marker Stone
Made by *Checco*
After the battle, 39 cavalry horses that had been shot for breastworks during Custer’s Last Stand, were found among the dead on Last Stand Hill. In 1879, a temporary cordwood monument was erected by the Army on the crest of the hill. The area, strewn with cavalry horse skeletons, was policed and the remains of the horses placed inside the cordwood monument. In July 1881, Lt. Charles F. Roe and a detail from the Second Cavalry replaced the temporary monument with the present granite monument, and interred the Seventh Cavalry casualties around the base. The 2nd Cavalrymen in fond reverence for the horses, re-interred them here, after the monument was erected, and lined the horse cemetery with cordwood from the original monument.

Mrs. Julia Roach

Mrs. Julia Roach
Made by DC Products
Taken directly from the Custer National Cemetery guide: Mrs. Roach had the distinction of being the first woman shot by her husband in Montana Territory. A laundress at Ft. C.F. Smith, married to Pvt. Roach, she reportedly had the fastest, sharpest tongue in the west. Apparently her mild-mannered husband reached his limit and shot Julia. The post commander felt this murder did not come under Army jurisdiction and promised to turn Roach over to a civilian magistrate. However, finding such an official at Ft. C.F. Smith was improbable. Eventually, Roach was released from house arrest, re-turned to duty and shipped to another post when his outfit was transferred. This represented one case in which a murder went unpunished.

White Swan Memorial Library

White Swan Memorial Library
Made by WY Man
This stone house is the White Swan Memorial Library located at the Little Bighorn National Monument, or the Custer Battlefield. The photo is my first experiment using HDR photography. I used Photomatix Pro 3 to generate the HDR image from three exposures. The alignment feature of the program allows you to process hand held photos, and it is supposed to align the images, which I think that it did correctly. However I notice some places where the images did not line up correctly. They are most noticeable in the text areas, such as the sign on the gate. My angle must have shifted slightly during the exposures; not up, or down, or left, or right, but in panning and tilting between the exposures.

Lest We Forget

Lest We Forget
Made by bhophotos
THE MUFFLED drum's sad roll has beat    The soldier's last tattoo; No more on Life's parade shall meet    That brave and fallen few. Theodore O'Hara. 1820–1867 Found on a plaque along the path in the cemetery. The Custer National Cemetery is located at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument seventy-five miles east of Billings, Montana. Approximately 4900 soldiers, sailors, and their spouses, from the Indian Wars to Vietnam, are currently interned here.  large on black. Little Bighon Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, Montana.   location on map.

Custer National Cemetery

Custer National Cemetery
Made by Nomadic Lass
Approximately 4,000 service members killed in action, veterans, and their spouses have been buried at the Custer National Cemetery, which lies inside the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument and is within sight of where Custer and his men fell at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Oddly, most of those killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn are not interned here; rather they (the ones that were killed during the last stand) are buried in a mass grave atop Last Stand Hill. Custer himself is interned at West Point. July 2011 11) Pennants, banners and ribbons wave in the wind

Lest We Forget

Lest We Forget
Made by bhophotos
THE MUFFLED drum's sad roll has beat    The soldier's last tattoo; No more on Life's parade shall meet    That brave and fallen few. Theodore O’Hara (1820–1867) Found on a plaque along the path in the cemetery. Custer National Cemetery was established in 1886 for veterans of the armed forces of the United States and their immediate families. Buried here are soldiers and sailors of the Indian Wars, Spanish American War, World War One, World War Two, Korean War, and Vietnam.   large on black. Crow Agency, Montana.   location on map.

BunRab

BunRab
Made by Nomadic Lass
We saw so many rabbits while in the Billings area, and I was thrilled to shoot this little guy - ever so content munching on his clover dinner - thinking I'd end up with a number of ridiculously and adorably cute photos. Yeah, well this fellow had a trick up his sleeve to get back at those annoying photographers... So, I get home, upload said cutesy shots, and what does my little furry friend have on his ear? Bunny poo. Dangling off the back of his ear like a huge engorged tick. Every.single.shot....except this one... o.O Love ya, BunRab...

June Evening at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (MT)

June Evening at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (MT)
Made by Ron Cogswell
Site of Gen. Custer's Last Stand in southeast Montana, which culminated the June 25, 1876, battle between the U.S. Army's 7th Cavalry and several Indian tribes. This area memorializes one of the last armed efforts of the Northern Plains Indians to preserve their way of life. Here 263 soldiers and attached personnel of the U.S. Army, including Lt. Col. George A. Custer, met death at the hands of several thousand Lakota Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors Photo taken by Ron Cogswell on a June 2006 evening.

Joe Medicine Crow at the Little Bighorn Memorial

Joe Medicine Crow at the Little Bighorn Memorial
Made by WY Man
Under the large monument lie the remains of some 220 7th Cavalry soldiers who died with Custer on June 25, 1876. Custer's bones were taken to West Point, New York for burial. Joe Medicine Crow is a 95 year old grandson of White Man Runs Him, Crow Indian scout for Custer and the 7th Cavalry. White Man Runs Him was with Custer and the 7th on that fateful day, but he and the other Crow scouts were discharged early, and so escaped the slaughter.



Nearest places of interest:

Deep Ravine
Saint Xavier
Finkle ridge
Calhoun hill
  Deep Ravine Trail
Last Stand Hill
Custer National Cemetery
Custer Battlefield Trading Post Cafe

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