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The Water Tower, Westgate, Lincoln

The Water Tower, Westgate, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
Between November 1904 and April 1905, 1006 people in Lincoln contracted typhoid and of these 113 died. It was Lincoln's biggest peacetime tragedy. The outbreak of the disease was caused by a polluted supply of drinking water, which at the time was taken from a reservoir at Hartsholme (on the edge of the city) and from the River Witham. Despite heavy chlorination of the water public faith in the supply dwindled and many resorted to drawing water from ancient wells. Faced with a crisis situation, city officials and the Water Board realised that the provision of clean water and proper sanitation would be the only way to curb the disease and restore the residents' faith in the public water supply. The first step was to find a suitable source clean water, this was located over the county border at Elkesley in Nottinghamshire where bore holes were sunk through the limestone. (The cores from the boreholes can be seen in taken in The Arboretum in Lincoln). A 22-mile long main was laid from Elksley to Lincoln, where the construction of the Westgate Water Tower was Commissioned by the Lincoln Corporation. The architect, Sir Reginald Blomfield (1856-1942), designed the tower to resemble a medieval keep so as to give a sense of continuity with the city's castle and cathedral. On its completion the Westgate Water Tower had an immediate impact on the city. The local paper The Lincolnshire Echo recorded an air of excitement in the city in anticipation of a new supply of drinking water. This mammoth project was not completed until 1911. Still in use today and a principle source of water for uphill Lincoln the tower, holding some 330,000 gallons (1,356,000 ltrs), remains an imposing landmark visible from miles away. Some facts & figures for the tower: * Building started in 1907, completed in 1911. * Contractors: Henson & Son, Wellingborough. * Materials: circular inner: brick - square outer: local brown Darley Dale gritstone * Dimensions: external: 17.08m (56ft) square, internal: 14.95m (49ft) diam at ground level, height to top of parapet wall: 35.8m (117ft), height to top water mark: 33.55m (110ft) * Circular brick wall supporting water tank: 1.31m (4ft 3in) Some facts & figures for the tank: * Dimensions: 15.86m (52ft) diam * Materials: mild steel * Contractors: Newton Chambers and Co Ltd, Sheffield * Top water level: 100.65m (330ft) above ordnance datum, 35.99m (118ft) above ground * Tank depth at centre: 9.45m (31ft) * Holding capacity: 1,356,000 ltrs (300,000 gals) about a day's supply for the Uphill district * Tank weight: 1,422,400 kg (1,400 tonnes) * Internal fittings: Spiral stairwell in one arise (corner) to access roof and tank. Winch provided at tank level for material access

The River Witham, Lincoln

The River Witham, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
The River Witham flows for almost it's entire length through the county of Lincolnshire rising south of Grantham and flowing into The Haven, a tidal arm of The Wash, and thence into the North Sea. Entering into Lincoln from the south it passes through the Lincoln Gap, a break in the limestone escarpment that runs roughly north-south through Lincolnshire, and turns and heads off to the east. The section of the river through Lincoln tends to be canalized, as can be seen in this shot, both to protect the banks and for the convenience of the barges that at one time plied between Lincoln and Boston carrying grain to the many mills that were situated alongside the river as it entered Lincoln and beside the Brayford Pool . Not only were there many mills along the river side but alehouses too to satisfy the thirst of the bargees. In the short distance that can be seen in this shot were the Lord Nelson Inn, Spread Eagle Vaults, Saracen's Head Tap, Labourer's Arms, Witham Inn & the Gardeners' Arms. The bridge crossing the river with buildings on it is The High Bridge, is on the High Street and there yet more drinking establishments could be found. The slum dwellings in this area and the pubs were demolished many years ago, the mills lasted a little longer although no mills now remain although I can recall barges unloading when I was young. Now the only traffic on the river is pleasure craft.

Roman Remains, Lincoln (and a mystery)

Roman Remains, Lincoln (and a mystery)
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
This shot shows a section of the Roman Wall about 200 meters east of Newport Arch , the 3rd century northern gateway to the Roman city of Lindum Colonia. Marked out on the ground, just insisde the wall, is the location of a Roman Reservoir. Whilst people dug wells and collected rainwater for everyday needs these sources could not supply all the public works of the colonia. A pipeline was therefore constructed, which stretched north eastwards for over a mile, at least as far as a spring known as Roaring Meg. The pipe was made of clay and encased in opus signinum. Near this possible source, a bridge to carry an aqueduct was built. Some of the bridge pillars have been excavated. The only problem is the spring was about 30 metres (98 feet) lower than the colonia reservoir. Whilst it is possible that some device was used used to lift water into the aqueduct the absence of lime deposits in the pipes that have been recovered suggest that water never passed through them so maybe the scheme was a failure. To this day it is unknown where the water to fill the reservoir came from. It has been suggested that wells may have been dug outside the wall to obtain the necessary supplies but this has not been confirmed although I have heard of two properties within a short distance of Newport Arch where there are old covered in wells although the age of them is unknown.

House in Blue

House in Blue
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
This house, situated in Priory Gate, Lincoln, overlooks the Cathedral and stands on the site of an property occupied by William Byrd (1543-1623), the foremost composer of the Elizabethan age and undoubtedly one of the Cathedral's most celebrated organists. In 1563, Byrd was appointed organist and choirmaster at the Cathedral in Lincoln, a post which he held from 1563 to 1572. It seems that in order to secure his services, cathedral officials (the Chapter) offered him a rectory in Hainton, Lincolnshire, and a house (free of rent), as well as an impressive salary. His apointment was slightly unusual in that he was a devout Catholic and composed great Roman masses and Latin motets in addition to the services for the English Church. Held in great admiration by Queen Elizabeth I, in 1588 she commissioned him to set to music her poem “Look and bow down Thine ear, O Lord,” in celebration of the defeat of the Spanish Armada. It was first performed in the Byrd setting by the choristers of Christ's Hospital in front of St Paul's Cathedral later that year. Byrd must have had mixed feelings about this particular piece, for Elizabeth's words suggest that her role in the Armada's defeat had almost religious resonances which would have been at odds with his faith

BMI Hospital, Nettleham Road, Lincoln

BMI Hospital, Nettleham Road, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
The BMI Hospital in Lincoln is a private hospital delivering high quality private patient care. Despite the name it will always be thought of by the majority of Lincoln residents as The Bromhead, the name of it's founder. On 28 May 1866 an Institution for Nurses was opened and trained nurses at Mrs AF Bromhead's house on Greestone Terrace, it provided nurses for the poor of Lincoln and aided other institutions during epidemics. In 1869 further premises were needed and rented locally until in 1887 this building, known at the time as The Red House, was built on the corner of Nettleham Road and Church Lane as a memorial to the founder and first Lady Superintendent, Mrs AF Bromhead. The Red House was extended on several subsequent occasions and became known as the Bromhead Nursing Home. It was taken over by the National Health Service in 1948, but in 1981 it became the Bromhead Hospital, run by an independent charitable trust. In 2001 it was sold to the Nuffield Hospitals Group and became known as the Lincoln Nuffield Hospital until in February this year when ownership passed on to the BMI Healthcare Group.

Peter De Wint's House, Lincoln

Peter De Wint's House, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
The famed landscape painter Peter de Wint (1784-1849) is well known for his watercolours. He studied art in London, and in 1809 entered the Academy schools. In 1812 he became a member of the Society of Painters in Watercolours, where he exhibited for many years, as well as at the Academy. Born in Staffordshire Of Dutch extraction, in 1810 he married the sister of William Hilton, a fellow artist from Lincoln with whom, in 1814, he purchased land and built this house where they both lived whilst resident in Lincoln. Situated at the junction of Union Road and Drury Lane in the uphill area of Lincoln it afforded wonderful views over the City. Apart from some early still lifes and studies of street scenes and markets nearly all de Wint's works are landscapes with many of the scenes set in Lincolnshire. His pictures can be found in London in the Tate, the National Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum and also in The Collection, an art-museum in Lincoln. I must admit that when young I must have walked past this house literally hundred's of times in ignorance of it's association with De Wint.

Ellis Mill, Lincoln

Ellis Mill, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
Years ago on Lincoln's windswept escarpment just north of the Castle could be seen nine windmills to process the corn grown in the many open fields to the north of the city. Whilst they were ideally situated to catch the westerly winds their exposed position left them at the mercy of violent gales. A particularly bad storm occured in February 1715 when two of the mills were blown down and around 50 others is the county suffered a similar fate. Over time others fell into disrepair and were eventually demolished. The last mill to survive, operating until 1940, was Ellis Mill, a tower mill built in 1798 and which replaced an earlier mill on the site. It has a full complement of sails until 1916 when two were removed because of weakness at the top of the tower. In 1977 Lincoln Civic Trust purchased the mill, which was derelict which having suffered a fire 4 years earlier, with a view to restoring it. Today the mill is in full working order with 4 new sails and is once again producing flour.

East Holmes Signal Box, Lincoln

East Holmes Signal Box, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
The East Holmes signal box just to the west of Lincoln Central Station is a familiar sight to the people of Lincoln. The main function of the box was to control the junction of the original route (which later became The Holmes Yard) and a deviation around it which carried the through traffic. The is a fine example of an all-timber box of an 1871 design. Very evident in the photograph is the additional row of windows (now whited out) below the main glazing. Although this looks as if it may have been an afterthought, it was actually a feature of a number of boxes of the era. These panes, which extend down to operating floor level, allowed a better view of points and signals immediately in front of the box. Following a multi million pound investment in the local rail network the replacement of the old semaphore signals with modern LED colour lights means that four existing signal boxes including East Holmes became redundant. This is one of two boxes, however, that have been preserved.

Face of Steel

Face of Steel
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
This giant face formed from small strips of stainless, the work of artist Rick Kirkby, can be found on the large end wall of the Drill Hall in the city. A somewhat new addition to this old building dating from 1890 and paid for by city industrialist Joseph Ruston who presented the building by Deed of Gift to the Mayor of Lincoln and opened on 24 May 1890 by The Right Honorary Edward Stanhope, Secretary of State for War and Member of Parliament for Horncastle. For most of the first part of the 20th Century it was used as a military & police training hall, but was also available for entertainment and was used by Mr Ruston’s employees for regular dances. After the Second World War all kinds of events began to be staged in the Drill Hall; from wrestling, to bingo, to live bands. The Rolling Stones played here on 31 December 1962, prior to their appearance on the very first Top of the Pops the next day!

West Gate, Lincoln Castle

West Gate, Lincoln Castle
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
The only entrance to Lincoln Castle for many years was via the but when Lincoln Castle had military significance the West Gate would have been the more important entrance to the castle as it gave access to the open country. A two storey gate tower was built in the late 11th or early 12th century. During the 13th or 14th century it was filled with stones and rubble, so blocking it and putting the gateway out of use for many hundreds of years. However, in April 1993 the gate was re-opened after the decision was made to excavate it. The Lincoln Castle Stone Masons spent two years rebuilding the gateway and each stone was hand adjusted. Incidentally the Roman wall was buried within an earth rampart and extended upward to form the Norman castle wall. The Roman west gate (on the same site as the castle's west gate) was excavated in the 19th century but collapsed on exposure.

Lincoln Cathedral from Westgate

Lincoln Cathedral from Westgate
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
Lincoln Cathedral rises over the Buildings of the Bailgate area. Until 1971 this view would have been hidden. The bushes in the foreground are in a small garden which occupies the site of the former church of St Paul in the Bail which stood on the site of a church erected by Blecca, the Roman governor of the city, who was baptised by St. Paulinus. That original church fell down in 1302 and was rebuilt at the cost of the parishioners. It decayed again and was rebuilt in 1786 to be replaced by a Victorian church 1875, this later church was demolished in 1971. Excavations in 1972 on the site revealed the civic forum which occupied a central position in the Upper City and a Roman well which would have been positioned near the centre of the Roman military fortress and in a room of the east range of the subsequent civic forum.

Lincoln Cathedral from Castle Hill, Lincoln

Lincoln Cathedral from Castle Hill, Lincoln
Made by SwaloPhoto
Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln) is the seat of the Bishop of Lincoln. It was reputedly the tallest building in the world for 249 years (1300–1549) surpassing the Great Pyramid of Giza, which held the record for almost 4,000 years. The central spire collapsed in 1549 and was not rebuilt. It is highly regarded by architectural scholars as one of the most important architectural buildings in England. The Bishop of Lincoln, Hugh of Wells, was one of the signatories to the Magna Carta and for hundreds of years the Cathedral has held one of the four remaining copies of the original which is now securely displayed in Lincoln Castle. There are three other surviving copies; two at the British Library and one at Salisbury Cathedral. Explored 16/01/11

Medieval Bishops' Palace, Lincoln

Medieval Bishops' Palace, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
Lincoln Medieval Bishops' Palace is a 12th century stone enclosure fortress standing almost in the shadow of Lincoln Cathedral and and is one of the most impressive medieval clerical house's in England. There are the remains of the 12th century great hall & kitchen together with Bishop Alnwick's 15th century entrance tower and chapel range. Commanding sweeping views over the ancient city the medieval bishops’ palace was once among the most important buildings in the country, the administrative centre of the largest diocese in medieval England stretching from the Humber to the Thames. Its architecture reflected the enormous power and wealth of the bishops. Having hosted visits from King Henry VIII and King James I, the palace was sacked by Royalist troops during the Civil War.

East Gate, Lincoln Castle

East Gate, Lincoln Castle
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
This gateway, the main, and only, entrance to the castle until the blocked up West Gate was opened up some years ago, would have been of wood - as would all the Castle walls. Much of the original structure, dating from 1068, was destroyed by a fire in 1113 which resulted in the damaged wooden walls being replaced by stone ones. During the 13th century two inner towers were added which strengthened the gateway. The Gothic arch then became the face of the new East Gate. The present wooden gates date from the 18th century and are mounted in the old portcullis slots. In the foreground stand two old Cannons once used in the 19th century as gateposts at a local brewery, they were rescued by the local museum in 1911. Restored, they have stood outsiode the Castle entrance since 1983.

Central Tower, Lincoln Cathedral

Central Tower, Lincoln Cathedral
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
The central tower of Lincoln Cathedral is the tallest medieval tower in Europe. Bishop Remigius built the first Cathedral on the present site. It took 20 years but the Cathedral was destroyed in a fire some 50 years later. Bishop Alexander rebuilt and expanded the cathedral only for it to be destroyed by an earthquake in 1185. After the earthquake a new Bishop, St Hugh of Lincoln, (originally from Avalon, France) began a massive rebuilding and expansion programm although it wasn't until between 1307 and 1311 that the central tower was raised to its present height of 271 feet (83m). At this time, a tall lead-encased wooden spire topped the central tower but it was blown down in a storm in 1549. With its spire, the tower reputedly reached a height of 525 feet (160m).

Steep Hill, Lincoln

Steep Hill, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
Steep Hill links the modern shopping area of downtown Lincoln with the historic area at the top of the hill. Looking south from near Castle Hill it doesn't look all that steep but the gradient starts to increase as you go round the slight bend seen in the distance in this shot., OK when going down but you understand why it was so named when you are coming up. Many of the properties you pass on the upper section of Steep Hill are steeped in history, the premises occupied by the Wig & Mitre pub on the right date back to the 14th century whilst just out of view round the bend is The Norman House (seen here), a rare example of Norman domestic architecture dating back to the end of the 12th century.

Self 55/365 - I ♥ Leaves

Self 55/365 - I ♥ Leaves
Made by Photography King ♛
Leaves are just so beautiful this time of year, I normally spend hours taking pictures of them, still as yet to do that... A strange realisation happened in a conversation I had with a friend the other day, he had just come back from Venice and was sharing the pictures of the ghettos which he found a fascination with. It occurred that among other things (as I've never been) I would be taking alot of self portraits of myself!!? I was almost in shock when I said it, I actually like taking self portraits. Please understand it doesn't mean I always like the way I look (does anyone?) in all the images. It certainly doesn't mean I'm narcissistic, it means I like the process and challenge that a self portrait represents. What a strange turnaround from 55 days ago

High Bridge, High Street, Lincoln

High Bridge, High Street, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
The High Bridge on Lincoln High Street dates from 16th century and carries the road, once one of the two main routes through the centre of Lincoln, over the River Witham. The area is now pedestrianised. The bridge is the only one in Britain still in use today with a secular a medieval building still standing on it and incorporated in its structure are the stone ribs of what is believed to be the second oldest masonry arch bridge in the country. Built of stone with later brickwork, the bridge has been extended in various stages - including an extension to accommodate a chapel in 1235 and a range of timber buildings in 1540-50. The original timber frame house was stripped down to the bare timbers in 1901-2 and completely restored to what is seen here.

Self 64/365 - Its all about preparation {explored}

Self 64/365 - Its all about preparation {explored}
Made by Photography King ♛
I know this is a message that is played and played too death! But I'm going to be going into the centre of the city I live in alot more from now on to do my self portraits (still mostly at night) So I have a feeling that at one time or another I might get stopped by the police!? So I'm reading up on certain things I can do and certain things they can't do. Not that I'm looking for trouble as I wouldn't say boo to a ghost but legally its always best to know were you stand. If you have no idea what Im talking about go here: photographernotaterrorist.org/ On a further note sorry about the lack of comments on your walls the last two days have been hectic Explored: oct 28th #371

Jews House,15 Strait and 1 Steep Hill, Lincoln

Jews House,15 Strait and 1 Steep Hill, Lincoln
Made by Lincolnian (Brian)
Jews House which dates from 1158 is a fine example of Norman domestic architecture with a rich ornamental doorway and chimney. It is reputed to be the oldest domestic building in Britain. Originally it had three segmental arches for shop fronts since replaced by modern insertions. In the Middle Ages Lincoln had a flourishing Jewish community with money lenders, traders and merchants. The people within this community were amongst the richest and most influential citizens of Lincoln and the building reflects the affluence of the Jewish communities traders of the time. This is possibly one of the reasons the Jews were expelled from Lincoln in 1290. It was once the residence of Bellaset of Wallingford who was executed for forgery in 1290.



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