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Liberty Bell building

the Liberty Bell building is part of Center City , Independence Mall .

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Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell
Made by polomex
Because I didn't have time to wait in the very long line of visitors, I snuck this pic of the famous bell through a window. I was surprised how well it turned out, considering I wasn't even in the building. The Liberty Bell originally cracked when it was first rung in 1752. It was mounted on a stand to test the sound, and at the first strike, the bell's rim cracked. Two local men broke the bell into small pieces, melted it down, and recast it in March 1753. The city threw a big public party to celebrate the new bell. The bell was struck, and it didn't break, but it didn't sound right. The crowd laughed, so the two casters quickly took the bell away and recast it again. The bell was completed and hung in the State House in June 1753. Over the years, the bell was used to summon the Assembly, mark the accession of George III to the throne, celebrate the reading of the Declaration of Independence (July 8, 1776, along with several other bells), honor the Fourth of July, commemorate Washington's birthday, remind voters of Election Day, and call students to class at University of Pennsylvania. It's uncertain when or how its current large crack occurred. The first mention of its crack is in 1846, when local newspapers noted that the bell was already cracked but had been repaired. The bell was rang in February that year for Washington's birthday, which caused the pre-existing crack to amplify, taking the shape as it is seen today. The bell was never repaired again. Due to a series of errors in its construction, reconstruction, and re-reconstruction; custodians concluded that the bell would never sound right and would likely break again. By then, the crack had become part of the bell's character.

Let Freedom Ring!

Let Freedom Ring!
Made by medieval panda
The Pennsylvania Assembly ordered the Bell in 1751 to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of William Penn's 1701 Charter of Privelages, Pennsylvania's original Constitution. It was originally cast by Whitechapel Foundry (England) in 1752. The bell cracked upon it's first ring. Pass and Stow of Phila. recast the bell in 1753. The Bell was rung for various important occasions, such as calling the Assembly together and to summon people for special announcements and events. Tradition holds that the Bell rang on July 8, 1776, summoning the citizens to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence. The Liberty Bell achieved an iconic status when abolutionists adopted the Bell as a symbol for the anti-slavery movement. It was, in fact, the abolutionists who gave it the name Liberty Bell. It was previously called simply the State House Bell. A timeline of events can be found on the Bell's homepage. You can even hear what the Liberty Bell sounded like before it became irrepairably cracked in 1846.

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell
Made by kwatson0013
This bell is located inside the Liberty Bell Learning Center in Philadelphia, Pa. It was made in 1752 and use to hang in the steeple at Independence Hall. It is known as one of the most impotant symbols of American Revolution. It was rung in 1774 when the First Continental Congress met, in 1775 when the Battle of Lexington and Concord ended, and in 1776 when the Declaration of Independence was first read outside independence Hall. It also rung after Alexander Hamilton was shot and killed, when John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died, and on George Washington's 100th birthday. It constantly rang for several minutes on George Washington's birthday and that's what cause the crack in the bell which would make it unusable. In 1852, the bell was removed from the steeple and was on display at the bottom of Independence Hall. It went on a tour of the country from 1885 to 1915. It has been in Philadelphia ever since.

The Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell
Made by Imagineering My Way
The Liberty Bell Center is located at 6th and Market Streets, with its entrance on 6th Street. The Liberty Bell has a new home, and it is as powerful and dramatic as the Bell itself. Throughout the expansive, light-filled Center, larger-than-life historic documents and graphic images explore the facts and the myths surrounding the Bell. X-rays give an insider’s view, literally, of the Bell’s crack and inner-workings. In quiet alcoves, a short History Channel film, available in English and eight other languages, traces how abolitionists, suffragists and other groups adopted the Bell as its symbol of freedom. Other exhibits show how the Bell’s image was used on everything from ice cream molds to wind chimes. Keep your camera handy. Soaring glass walls offer dramatic and powerful views of both the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, just a few steps away.

The Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell
Made by vic_sf49
Formerly located in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell was commissioned from the London firm of Lester and Pack (today the Whitechapel Bell Foundry) in 1752, and was cast with the lettering (part of Leviticus 25:10) Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof. It originally cracked when first rung after arrival in Philadelphia, and was twice recast by local workmen John Pass and John Stow, whose last names appear on the bell. In its early years, the Liberty Bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens to public meetings and proclamations. Bells were rung to mark the reading of the Declaration on July 8, 1776, and while there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung.

Let Freedom Ring

Let Freedom Ring
Made by Gary Burke.
The Liberty Bell was cast in the Whitechapel Foundry in the East End of London and sent to the building currently known as Independence Hall, then the Pennsylvania State House, in 1753. It was an impressive looking object, 12 feet in circumference around the lip with a 44-pound clapper. Inscribed at the top was part of a Biblical verse from Leviticus, “Proclaim Liberty throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants thereof.” Unfortunately, the clapper cracked the bell on its first use. A couple of local artisans, John Pass and John Stow, recast the bell twice, once adding more copper to make it less brittle and then adding silver to sweeten its tone. No one was quite satisfied, but it was put in the tower of the State House anyway.

The Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell
Made by wenzday01
Unfortunately, by the time I got there, the building that houses the bell was closed. This was as close as I got to it. From Wikipedia: According to tradition, its most famous ringing occurred on July 8, 1776, to summon citizens of Philadelphia for the reading of the Declaration of Independence. The bell had also been rung to announce the opening of the First Continental Congress in 1774 and after the Battle of Lexington and Concord in 1775. Historians today consider this highly doubtful, as the steeple in which the bell was hung had deteriorated significantly by that time.

Proud to be an American

Proud to be an American
Made by Gary Burke.
Veronica has been lucky enough to see a lot of the historical sites that have shaped America. Each year her school had overnight trips to different cities with notable US history. In 6th grade she went to Philadelphia, 7th grade was a trip to Boston and in 8th grade there was a visit to Washington DC. I never had anything like this when I was in school, but I'm really glad she can have these sorts of experiences. Not only does it make the history her class studies seem more real and alive but it also instills a sense of pride and appreciation for America.

City Reflection

City Reflection
Made by wenzday01
From Wikipedia: According to tradition, its most famous ringing occurred on July 8, 1776, to summon citizens of Philadelphia for the reading of the Declaration of Independence. The bell had also been rung to announce the opening of the First Continental Congress in 1774 and after the Battle of Lexington and Concord in 1775. Historians today consider this highly doubtful, as the steeple in which the bell was hung had deteriorated significantly by that time.

Proclaim Liberty 2

Proclaim Liberty 2
Made by Rick_Simpson
The Liberty Bell. The inscription is part of Leviticus 25:10 (KJV) ... proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof ... A hairline crack in the bell can be seen running from the bottom center of the picture up and to the right through the RTY in LIBERTY and beyond. See the Wikipedia article on the Liberty Bell. Photographed in the Liberty Bell Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Horse wearing people clothes

Horse wearing people clothes
Made by BrianMoranHDR
Horse wearing a Phillies hat and tie pulling a horse-drawn carriage in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For more on this photo, please visit my blog post: brianmoranhdr.blogspot.com/2010/12/two-shots-from-philade...

270

270
Made by Chris_Hancock
iPhone (no apps) i270/365 [10/2/11] A cool day spent as a tourist in Philly. Even though I live nearby, I had never been to Independence Hall or the Liberty Bell. Both are pretty cool and made even better by the time with my family. Remember, Philly is the city that love's you back...

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell
Made by etacar11
Rob looks on. The Liberty Bell is now housed in its own building. When I saw it in junior high school, I don't think it was. I'm not sure where it was in relation to Independence Hall. And you could get close enough to touch it. Which I did...

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell
Made by BrianMoranHDR
The Liberty Bell, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For more on this photo, please visit my blog post: brianmoranhdr.blogspot.com/2011/01/liberty-bell.html

Project 50 #20 Proclaim Liberty

Project 50 #20 Proclaim Liberty
Made by jacreative
50 photos in 50 days with a 50mm lens. Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants thereof Lev. XXV X By Order of the ASSEMBLY of the Province of PENSYLVANIA for the State House in Philada Pass and Stow Philada MDCCLIII

Liberty Belles

Liberty Belles
Made by Viejito
My patriotism would not allow me to publish a Philadelphia set without including a shot of the Liberty Bell, including its poor clapper, which is no longer allowed to do its job...

Gee dad, can we go yet?

Gee dad, can we go yet?
Made by pinkertonreborn
I like the expression on the kid with the Kermit shirt. Geez, it's just a broken bell, what's the big deal? IT'S ONLY OUR COUNTRY'S HISTORY DUH.

DSCF1352

DSCF1352
Made by cmruark
Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, Philadelphia Liberty Bell Center: Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, 2003 Independence Hall: Edmund Woolley, 1753

TCC9Q-03

TCC9Q-03
Made by rdowens9
scavenger hunt log

Liberty Bell #1

Liberty Bell #1
Made by scumdogsteev
The Liberty Bell, Philadelphia, PA



Nearest places of interest:

Public Ledger Building
The Curtis Center
Independence Hall
Philosophical Hall
  First Presidential Residence (outline Approximate)
5th and Market Street Station (Market-Frankford Line)
Rohm and Haas Corporate Headquarters
Philadelphia Federal Building

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