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Interesting places in Lamb Holm:
Lamb Holm Airfield   The Italian Chapel


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The Italian Chapel, Orkney (Exterior)

The Italian Chapel, Orkney (Exterior)
Made by foxypar4
The Italian Chapel on Lamb Holm in Orkney, Scotland, was built by Italian prisoners of war captured in Africa during World War II. The prisoners were stationed on the island between 1942 and 1945 to help in construction of the Churchill Barriers at Scapa Flow. The chapel was constructed from two Nissen huts joined end-to-end. The corrugated interior was then covered with plasterboard and the altar and altar rail were constructed from concrete left over from work on the barriers. Most of the interior decoration was done by Domenico Chiocchetti, a POW from Moena, who remained on the island to finish the chapel even when his fellow prisoners were released shortly before the end of the war. In 1958 the Chapel Preservation Committee was set up by a group of Orcadians and in 1960 Chiocchetti returned to the chapel to assist in the restoration. He returned again in 1964 but was too ill to travel when some of the other prisoners returned in 1992 to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of their arrival on the island. He died in 1999. Today the chapel remains a popular tourist attraction, receiving over 100,000 visitors every year. It has become one of the most well-known and moving symbols of reconciliation in the British Isles. Explore # 378

Italian chapel - Orkney, British isles

Italian chapel - Orkney, British isles
Made by Mike.D.Green
550 Italian prisoners of war, captured in North Africa during World War II, were brought to Orkney in 1942. They constructed the Churchill Barriers, four causeways created to block access to Scapa Flow. 200 were based at Camp 60 on [the island of] Lamb Holm. In 1943, Major T P Buckland, the Camp 60's new commandant, and Father Giacombazzi, the Camp's priest, agreed that a place of worship was required. The chapel was constructed from limited materials by the prisoners. Two Nissen huts were joined end-to-end. The corrugated interior was then covered with plasterboard and the altar and altar rail were constructed from concrete left over from work on the barriers. Most of the interior decoration was done by Domenico Chiocchetti, a POW from Moena. He painted the sanctuary end of the chapel and fellow-prisoners decorated the entire interior. They created a front facade out of concrete, concealing the shape of the hut and making the building look like a church. Chiocchetti remained on the island to finish the chapel, even when his fellow prisoners were released shortly before the end of the war.

Italian Chapel, Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland

Italian Chapel, Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
Made by Maria i David
The Italian Chapel is the only building that remains of Camp 60, a Prisoner of War (P.O.W.) camp constructed in the latter half of 1941. From January 1942 until the Spring of 1945 the Camp housed Italian POW's of the 6th Antic Aircraft Regiment of the Mantova Division and men from the Italian Tank Corps. Most of these prisoners, renamed the 5th Italian Labour Battalion, were captured at Tobruk and Benghazi following the North African campaign during World War II. The men were distributed to three P.O.W. camps in Orkney; 500 at Lamb Holm and a further 700 in two camps in Burray. There were brought in to assist the contractors with the construction of causeways, later known as the Churchill Barriers, to block off the eastern approaches to Scapa Flow where the British Fleet often lay at anchor. The prisoner's civilian occupations covered a wide range of skills, from artists to an sculptors to electricians and iron workers. To make the camp more homely the prisoners built this chapel.

italian chapel - altarpiece

italian chapel - altarpiece
Made by seligr
One of the most frequently visited and popular places on Orkney is the Italian Chapel. Built by Italian POW's out of two Nissan huts and lovingly and skillfully fashioned, it never fails to move those who see it. Often photopgraphed I know, my only excuse for adding this familiar altarpiece is to explore it further by the medium of video combined with graphics programming manipulations that are readily available. These here have been produced using a kaleidoscopic effect and are accompanied by a Gregorian Chant. I offer it as a tribute to those PoW's and in particular the artist, Domenico Chiocchetti. (For info on the chapel see www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/eastmainland/italianchapel/ ) Enjoy. (Note: this is a somewhat shortened version in order to comply with the 90 second limits on flickr.)

The Italian Chapel

The Italian Chapel
Made by Rodents rule
I imagine the last place that the Italian soldiers fighting Mussolini's North African campaign believed they would end up would be the Orkney Islands. Many of the prisoners of Camp 60 were employed on the island to build the Churchill Barriers used to halt German U-Boats from entering the harbours of Scapa Flow. This was decreed by Winston Churchill following the tragic sinking of the Royal Oak in 1939 with an estimated loss of life of 800. Making the most of their surroundings, the Italians constructed concrete pathways and were given Two 'Nissen' huts ( identified by their round basic shape and corrugated iron roofs), one to be used as a school, the other as the chapel. From: www.scotsitalian.com/orkney_chapel.htm

Italian Chapel, Orkney (On a dull wet day)

Italian Chapel, Orkney (On a dull wet day)
Made by wicker05
In 1942 some Italian prisoners of war, captured in North Africa, were brought to Orkney to help with construction of the Churchill Barriers. Camp 60 was home to the Italian prisoners from 1942 until early 1945. One thing Camp 60 did lack was a chapel. In 1943 the camp acquired a new commandant, Major T.P. Buckland. He favoured the idea, as did Father Giacombazzi the Camp Padre. Late in 1943 two Nissen huts were provided. They were joined together end to end, with the intention of providing a chapel in one end and a school in the other. The work of turning the Nissen huts into a chapel fell to the prisoners themselves, led by Domenico Chiocchetti. The end result is a work of art that must have been utterly stunning to those imprisoned here.

The Italian Chapel

The Italian Chapel
Made by little_frank
The Italian Chapel, Orkney Islands (Scotland). Standing alone on the little island of Lamb Holm, Orkney Islands (Scotland), watched over by a statue of St George slaying the dragon, stands what is now known throughout the world as, simply, The Italian Chapel. It is the only visible reminder that this was once the site of Camp 60 – the prisoner-of-war camp where hundreds of Italians were housed while they worked on the nearby Churchill Barriers more than 60 years ago. It is also a remarkable example of how a faith can survive in the adversity of war, and it stands today as a symbol of peace and reconciliation after those years of conflict in World War Two.

St George Italian Chapel Orkney

St George Italian Chapel Orkney
Made by Chris Hawkes
St George killing the dragon Concrete on a barbed wire frame. Produced by Domenico Chiocchetti, an Italian PoW who also led the construction of the Italian Chapel. St George's symbol is the slain dragon, symbolising the defeat of Satan. Twelfth century legend has him defeating the dragon, and there have been attempts to link him to a 4th century historical unnamed Roman Christian martyred under Diocletian. The Bollandist Father Delehaye has undertaken lengthy research into this Saint. St George is the Patron Saint of England, and several other countries (such as Italy, hence Domenico Chiocchetti's choice of sculpture.) His feast day is April 23rd.

Italian Chapel

Italian Chapel
Made by deathbywater
The Italian Chapel is a highly ornate Catholic chapel on Lamb Holm in Orkney, Scotland. It was built by Italian prisoners of war during World War II, who were housed on the previously uninhabited island while they constructed the Churchill Barriers to the east of Scapa Flow. Only the concrete foundations of the other buildings of the prisoner-of-war camp survive. It was not completed until after the end of the war, and was restored in the 1960s and again in the 1990s. It is now a popular tourist attraction, and a category A listed building en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Chapel

Italian Chapel

Italian Chapel
Made by Shertila Tony
on the island of Lambholm connected by the Churchill Barrier to Glimsholm, Burray to South Ronadlsay. Italian Prisoners of war captured during world war II in North Africa where housed here and put to work building the causeway. The causeway protected the ships anchored in Scapa Flow from enemy encounters. the Soldiers joined two Nissan huts together and created the chapel. the Interior was painted to represent stone walls. the sanctuary end of the chapel was painted by Chiocchetti. The front exterior was then built to conceal the shape of the huts and give a church facade.

Respect

Respect
Made by glaesmann
This picture is dedicated to my dear Flickr-friend Kai from New York, who wrote me a lovely testimonial! Thank you for that, Kai! When we came to the Italian Chapel during this year's trip to Orkney I felt really deep respect for those prisoners of war who (after their days work of building the Churchill Barriers) still found the time and need and ability to build something as amazing as this chapel. It's built of two Nissen huts and lined with plasterboard and than painted. Everything you see here is painted, there is no brickwork inside the chapel.

Italian Church Orkney

Italian Church Orkney
Made by Rainbow_85
During World War II, 550 Italian prisoners of war, captured in North Africa in 1942 were brought to Orkney. 200 prisoners were on Lamb Holm. The prisoners built the church using two Nissen huts and the facade was made from concrete. The inside walls and ceiling although looking as if made from tiles are just painted giving a 3D effect. Domenico Chiocchetti painted the sanctuary and fellow prisoners helped paint the rest. Chiocchetti stayed on the island to finish the painting after the rest of the prisoners were released. See photo of interior.

The Italian Chapel In The Snow

The Italian Chapel In The Snow
Made by orquil
It was built by Italian Prisoners of War during World War 2 in Orkney. They arrived as Prisoners but when Italy capitulated they suddenly became Allies - but could not be be Re-Patriated towards the end of WW2 due to the lack of available shipping. A Wikipedia entry about the Italian Chapel in Orkney can be found at - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Chapel Thiis photo can also be seen on a a Black Background -

Middle of the Road

Middle of the Road
Made by RoystonVasey
The Churchill Barriers are a series of four causeways in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, with a total length of 1.5 miles (2.3km). They link the Orkney Mainland in the north to the island of South Ronaldsay via Burray and the two smaller islands of Lamb Holm and Glimps Holm. The barriers were built in the 1940s primarily as naval defences to protect the anchorage at Scapa Flow, but now serve as road links, carrying the A961 road from Kirkwall to Burwick.

The Italian Chapel

The Italian Chapel
Made by glaesmann
The Italian Chapel on Lamb Holm was built by Italian prisoners of war during WWII. I strongly recommend to read the following text www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/eastmainland/italianchapel/ This building sums up so many unbelievable facts that it's just amazing. Everything inside that looks like stone is painted. Hand painted, to be precise.

Italian Chapel Interior.

Italian Chapel Interior.
Made by Leyland 600
Prisoner of War Nissen Hut converted to a chapel by Italian POWs held on Lamb Holm , Orkney during WW 2. The POW helped build the Churchill Barriers across four sounds between the islands to prevent German submarines entering Scapa Flow. A proffessional church painter (Chiochetti) a POW was responsible for the decoration and Palumbo a blacksmith carried out the wrought ironwork from scrap.

Lamb Holm - On the Fringe Of Orkney's Scapa Flow

Lamb Holm - On the Fringe Of Orkney's Scapa Flow
Made by orquil
Built by Italian WW2 prisoners of war. Curiously the statue is of St George & the Dragon. The chapel behind was built using WW2 Nissen Huts. More details about Orkney's wartime Italian Chapel can be found at www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/eastmainland/italianchapel...

From St Mary's with love

From St Mary's with love
Made by joeri-c
With a view on the pier, the 1st Churchill Barrier and the Italian Chapel on Lamb Holm during golden hour. Churchill Barriers: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Churchill_Barriers Italian Chapel: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Chapel

Italian Chapel, Orkney

Italian Chapel, Orkney
Made by Ade Milne
Exterior of the Italian Chapel, Orkney, Scotland. The chapel was built out of limited materials by Italian prisoners during World War II. The chapel was constructed from two Nissen huts joined end-to-end. The corrugated interior was then covered with plasterboard and the altar and altar rail were constructed from concrete left over from work on the barriers.

Italian chapel

Italian chapel
Made by Barbara Rich
AD 1944 - Chapel built out of Nissen huts by Italian prisoners of the Second World War, at Lamb Holm, Orkney. The ornate lanterns were made out of bully beef cans, and the workmanship throughout the interior of the chapel would be strikingly skilful anywhere - all the more so for what must have been the lack of materials, tools and craftsmen at the time.



Nearest places of interest:

Churchill Barrier 2
Climps Holm
Grim Ness
  Lamb Holm Airfield
The Italian Chapel
Churchill Barrier 1
St Mary

PanoramioFlickr CC