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Korean War Veterans Memorial

the Korean War Veterans Memorial is part of The National Mall , West Potomac Park .

Location is derived from the great work of WikiMapia

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Korean War Memorial 2

Korean War Memorial 2
Made by tiz_herself
There are 19 statues approximately 7’3 tall, heroic scale and consist of 14 Army, 3 Marines, 1 Navy, 1 Air Force. They represent an ethnic cross section of America with 12 Caucasian, 3 African American, 2 Hispanic, 1 Oriental, 1 Indian (Native American). The juniper bushes are meant to be symbolic of the rough terrain encountered in Korea, and the granite stripes of the obstacles overcome in war. The Marines in column have the helmet chin straps fastened and helmet covers. Three of the Army statues are wearing paratrooper boots and all equipment is authentic from the Korean War era (when the war started most of the equipment was WWII issue). Three of the statues are in the woods, so if you are at the flagpole looking through the troops, you can't tell how many there are, and could be legions emerging from the woods. The statues are made of stainless steel, a reflective material that when seen in bright sunlight causes the figures to come to life. The blowing ponchos give motion to the column, so you can feel them walking up the hill with the cold winter wind at their backs, talking to one another. At nighttime the fronts of the statues are illuminated with a special white light; the finer details of the sculpture are clearly seen and the ghosts appear. The Mural Wall was designed by Louis Nelson of New York, N.Y., and fabricated by Cold Spring Granite Company, Cold Spring, Min. The wall consists of 41 panels extending 164 feet. Over 15,000 photographs of the Korean War were obtained from the National Archives to create the mural. The photographs were enhanced by computer to develop a uniform lighting effect and size, and to create a mural with over 2,400 images. The mural depicts Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard personnel and their equipment. The etchings are arranged to give a wavy appearance in harmony with the layout of the statues. The reflective quality of the Academy Black Granite creates the image of a total 38 statues, symbolic of the 38th Parallel and the 38 months of the war. When viewed from afar, it also creates the appearance of the mountain ranges of Korea. (Source: www.nab.usace.army.mil/projects/WashingtonDC/korean.html)

Washington DC: Korean War Veterans Memorial

Washington DC: Korean War Veterans Memorial
Made by wallyg
The Korean War Veterans Memorial was dedicated in West Potomac Park, southeast of the , on July 27, 1995, the 42nd anniversary of the armistice that ended the war. The memorial commemorates the more than 1.5 million Americans serving in the Korean War, including the 54,246 U.S. military personnel and 58,000 South Korean military personnel who died. The memorial consists of nineteen free-standing stainless steel figures, a circular reflecting pool, and a mural wall. Each of the larger than life free-standing stainless steel figures, designed by Frank Chalfant Gaylord II, stand between 7-feet, 3-inches and 7-feet, 6-inches tall. The figures, including 14 Army soldiers, 3 Marines, 1 Navy medic, and 1 Air Force forward, are dressed in full combat gear, and dispersed among strips of granite and juniper bushes. At the apex of the field is the circular 30-foot diameter Pool of Remembrance, whose reflection shows 38 soldiers, representing the 38th parallel. To the south of the field, is a 164-foot long wall, designed by Louis Nelson, ranging in height from 4 1/2-feet and 11-feet. It is made of more than 100 tons of highly polished Academy Black granite and sandblasted with more than 2,500 photographic, archival images representing the land, sea and air troops who supported those who fought in the war are sandblasted onto the wall. To the north of the field is the United Nations Wall, a low wall listing the 22 members of the United Nations that contributed troops or medical support. The idea for the monument originated with a group of Korean War veterans, including members of the 25th Infantry, who founded the Korean War Veterans Association in 1985. On Oct. 28, 1986, President Ronald Reagan approved a resolution authorizing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, American Battle Monuments Commission to erect a Korean War memorial on the mall and allocated $1 million in seed money. An initial design contest was won in 1989 by team from the Pennsylanvia State College School of Architecture. After they withdrew their design, Architects Cooper-Lecky then took over and supervised the design and construction of the memorial.

Korean War Memorial

Korean War Memorial
Made by kimberlyfaye
Korean War Veterans Memorial Frank Chalfant Gaylord II The Korean War Veterans Memorial is in the form of a triangle intersecting a circle. Memorial comprised of 19 free-standing stainless steel figures, a mural wall, and a circular reflecting pool. The 19 figures include 14 army soldiers, 3 marines, 1 navy medic, and 1 Air Force forward. Each is shrouded in wind-blown ponchos. The figures appear to be emerging from a field. At the apex of the field is a circular Pool of Remembrance. Behind them is the memorial wall, etched with over 2,000 images of veterans, including Caucasians, African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and Native Americans, who were part of the land, sea, and air forces in Korea between 1950 and 1953. Another wall lists the 22 countries that sent troops to Korea. The Korean War was a three-year escalation of a civil war between two rival Korean regimes, each of which was supported by external powers, with each trying to topple the other through political and guerilla tactics. After failing to strengthen their cause in the free elections held in South Korea during May 1950 and the refusal of South Korea to hold new elections per North Korean demands, the communist North Korean Army moved south on June 25, 1950 to attempt to reunite the Korean peninsula, which had been formally divided since 1948. In a larger sense, the conflict was then expanded by the United States and the Soviet Union's involvement as part of the larger Cold War. The main hostilities were during the period from June 25, 1950 until the ceasefire agreement was signed on July 27, 1953. Check out my photoblog: kimberlyfaye's photos.

Lost in Time (Defending Freedom)

Lost in Time (Defending Freedom)
Made by FlipMode79
Korean War Veterans Memorial Found this in my DC Archives: The shot was actually taken on Veteran's Day in 09 : ) Revisited & Revamped for your Viewing Pleasure: Best when Viewed in the Lightbox (L) There is a total of 19 stainless steel statues (I've managed to capture 15 of them) designed by Frank Gaylord, each larger than life-size, between 7 feet 3 inches (2.21 m) and 7 feet 6 inches (2.29 m) tall; each weighs nearly 1,000 pounds (500 kg). The figures represent a squad on patrol, drawn from each branch of the armed forces; fourteen of the figures are from the U.S. Army, three are from the Marine Corps, one is a Navy Corpsman, and one is an Air Force Forward Air Observer. They are dressed in full combat gear, dispersed among strips of granite and juniper bushes which represent the rugged terrain of Korea. Engraved on granite blocks near the water pool at the east end of the monument are the casualty statistics for the soldiers who fought in the war...reminders of the human cost of defending Freedom. Dead — United States: 54,246, United Nations: 628,833 Wounded — United States: 103,284, United Nations: 1,064,453. Captured — United States: 7,140, United Nations: 92,970. Missing — United States: 8,177, United Nations: 470,267. *For more information on the Koream War Veterans Memorial visit Wikipedia or the National Park Services.

Korean War Veterans Memorial 朝鲜战争老兵纪念碑

Korean War Veterans Memorial 朝鲜战争老兵纪念碑
Made by Yang and Yun's Album
Quoted from wikipedia: The Korean War Veterans Memorial is located in Washington, D.C.'s West Potomac Park, southeast of the Lincoln Memorial and just south of the Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by the U.S. Congress (Public Law 99-572) on October 28, 1986,[1] with design and construction managed by the Korean War Veterans Memorial Advisory Board and the American Battle Monuments Commission. President George H. W. Bush conducted the groundbreaking for the Memorial on June 14, 1992, Flag Day. It was dedicated on July 27, 1995, the 42nd anniversary of the armistice that ended the war, by President Bill Clinton and Kim Young Sam, President of the Republic of Korea, to the men and women who served during the conflict. Management of the memorial was turned over to the National Park Service, under its National Mall and Memorial Parks group. As with all National Park Service historic areas, the memorial was administratively listed on the National Register of Historic Places on the day of its dedication. 摘自维基百科:朝鲜战争老兵纪念碑(英语:Korean War Veterans Memorial)于1995年建于华盛顿特区,为纪念朝鲜战争中阵亡的美军士兵和联合国士兵。

Remembrance Day

Remembrance Day
Made by _Robert C_
A photo I took years back in Washington DC of the Korean War Veterans Memorial with a very primitive digital camera. Inspired by the lyrics of Mark Knopfler's Remembrance Day On your maypole green See the winding Morris men Angry Alfie Bill and Ken Waving hankies sticks and books All the earthen roofs Standing at the crease The batsman takes a look around The boys are fielding on home ground The steeple sharp against the blue When I think of you Sam and Andy Jack and John Charlie Martin Jamie Ron Harry Stephen Will and Don Matthew Michael On and on We will remember them Remember them Remember them We will remember them Remember them Remember them Time has slipped away The summer sky to autumn yields A haze of smoke across the fields Let's sup and fight another round And walk the stubbled ground When November brings The poppies on Remembrance Day When the vicar comes to say May God bless them, every one. Lest we forget our sons We will remember them Remember them Remember them We will remember them Remember them Remember them We will remember them Remember them Remember them We will remember them Remember them Remember them

Worthy of Our Gratitude

Worthy of Our Gratitude
Made by christopherdale
Korean War Memorial on the National Mall, Washington D.C. Late-night, twenty-five-second exposure. While waiting for a long exposure to finish up, an older gentleman--a veteran of the Vietnam War--slowly made his way past my friend and me. He paused to comment on my camera. We mentioned our surprise that he was there at such an hour, seeing as it was past midnight and the majority of those remaining on the Mall were young hooligans like ourselves. He replied that he enjoys the monuments much more at night because they have at that hour a feeling not present in the light of the day. He is 65, and meandered about the monument with a gravity to his step and disposition that spoke of a personal connection to the events memorialized therein. He discussed the trouble he has sleeping at night due to memories of the war, and how he was spat upon in the airport when returning home in full uniform. We repeatedly thanked him for his service, and as he slowly made his way out of sight, were left with a clearer understanding of (and increased gratitude for) the noble deeds of so many of our countrymen and women.

Korean War Memorial 01

Korean War Memorial 01
Made by jbarnesflickr
Korean War Memorial: I've been wanting to shoot this memorial for a while. I had spent a week in DC during which we had dense fog every night and I thought this group of sculptures would be particularly moody in that environment. But, the night I was available to go shoot, the weather cleared and got bitterly cold. Disappointed, I skipped it entirely. This time, I was determined to get a good shot, so, despite the cold and clear conditions, I made the long walk in the dark to the Mall. Walking around the memorial, I realized that the background is very cluttered with lights and other visual intrusions. I would likely be better in the summer when the trees are full, but I was there on a winter's night. So I stalked around the whole thing twice before I set up the two shots posted here trying to frame with minimal intrusion. The lighting was somewhat stark but the angle was nice, casting deep shadows across the soldiers' faces. This is the lead soldier in the group.

Ghost in the Granite

Ghost in the Granite
Made by KiHo Photo
Location: Korean War Veterans Memorial, Washington D.C. Date: Monday May 16, 2005 Time: 1:55 PM I took this picture while visiting our nation’s capital. This is a small portion of a larger picture. The wall at the Korean War Veterans Memorial is a large granite wall with faint etchings of soldiers. I was standing in a shadow perpendicular to the wall. When I took the shot the automatic flash, flashed. Not only did it wash out the entire image, but I have a huge hot spot from the flash. This was the only part of the image I could salvage. I used PS to crop the image. I also used the cloning tool to remove a partial image that we cut off on the left. I played with the Brightness and contrast controls. I did like the results that came from those adjustments, but I decided just to leave it to the original washed out look. This is color and not Black and White.

Sculptures of Korean War Veterans Memorial

Sculptures of Korean War Veterans Memorial
Made by brokenjade
Designed by Frank Gaylord and dedicated on July 27, 1995 by American President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam, this memorial depicts 19 American soldiers making their way through the rough terrain of Korea. Almost surreal in appearance, especially in the shadows of dusk, the lifelike statues stand about 7 feet tall (2m) and represent various branches of the armed forces including 14 Army personnel, 3 Marines, 1 member of the Navy, and 1 member of the Air Force. These detailed sculptures also represent an ethnic cross section of the American melting pot. Visitors will count 14 Caucasians, 3 African-Americas, 2 Hispanics, 1 Oriental, and 1 Native American soldier... @ a view on cities HAVE A NICE MEMORIAL DAY!

War is HELL... any way you look at it...

War is HELL... any way you look at it...
Made by toryporter (back... FAR behind!)
Photos in this composite were taken Friday evening of the Memorial Day week-end when we honor and remember our military... The Korean War Memorial in Washington, DC was a perfect place to experiment with different modes for white balance and to take snaps in color vs. B&W mode. Washington Photo Safari leads classes in night shooting and other special interest topics... I wanted to learn how to take night shots and get decent results... am well on my way now!) Getting sharp focus while shooting in Manual mode at night is very tricky... hard to see what you are doing! Created with fd's Flickr Toys.

Tireless

Tireless
Made by HipChicklette (perenially catching up)
Two of the many sculptures from the Korean Memorial in Washington, DC. The artist did such an amazing job conveying emotions and spirit in these embodiments. The faces and postures speak volumes. They look so tired, and war-worn. Can't imagine all our service folks have seen and experienced in the name of duty. Am so grateful for their sacrifices. Camera: Canon EOS Rebel T1i Lens: EF28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Filter: none ISO Speed: 100 Focal Length: 53mm Exposure Value: 0 Aperture: f/5 Shutter Speed: 1/800 of a second Flash: Off, did not fire Post-processing: square crop, converted to b&w, -1.25 black point, .03 recovery

Freedom is not Free

Freedom is not Free
Made by Fab05
I thought this would be an apt shot for Memorial Day. The Korean War Memorial is quite a powerful tribute to the men and woman who served. It's a special place to visit especially at night. Here, one finds the expression of American gratitude to those who restored freedom to South Korea. Nineteen stainless steel sculptures stand silently under the watchful eye of a sea of faces upon a granite wall—reminders of the human cost of defending freedom. These elements all bear witness to the patriotism, devotion to duty, and courage of Korean War veterans. - nps.gov Korean War Veterans Memorial National Mall Washington D.C.

Freedom . .

Freedom . .
Made by grantthai
. .is not free. The Korean War Veterans Memorial is located in Washington, D.C.'s West Potomac Park, southeast of the Lincoln Memorial and just south of the Reflecting Pool on the National Mall. It commemorates those who served in the Korean War. I'm aware I still owe the image of the (right click & open) attacking the temple building, but I have just returned from a business travel to the US which encompassed a stay in Washington DC. I was able to escape and have a full morning free to do nothing but walk around and take photographs. I'll post the dragon shortly.

Korean War Veterans Memorial

Korean War Veterans Memorial
Made by Bev and Steve
The memorial is in the form of a triangle intersecting a circle. Within the triangle are 19 stainless steel statues designed by Frank Gaylord, each larger than life-size, between 7 feet 3 inches and 7 feet 6 inches. The figures represent a squad on patrol, drawn from each branch of the armed forces; fifteen of the figures are from the U.S. Army, two are from the Marine Corps, one is a Navy Corpsman, and one is an Air Force Forward Air Observer. They are dressed in full combat gear, dispersed among strips of granite and juniper bushes which represent the rugged terrain of Korea. Wikipedia

Freedom is Not Free

Freedom is Not Free
Made by Scott Kasper Photography
Korean War Memorial, Washington, DC. No it is not...However we need to chose carefully when we decide which battles we need to fight to maintain that freedom. Whether its freedom of religion, freedom from tyranny, freedom from slavery, or free flowing oil, we need to decide at what cost. Today we have American boys giving their lives in Iraq, and while I support every single one of them, our Don Quixote of a President needs to decide that this windmill is not worth the cost. He made a bad decision and needs to make it right!

Haunted

Haunted
Made by HipChicklette (perenially catching up)
I find the eyes of this soldier very haunted. He is one of the troops memorialized at the Korean War Memorial in Washington, DC. This monument is so moving. Actually, all of the war memorials in DC are incredibly moving. His facial expression and eyes are much easier to see when you in large. Camera: Canon EOS Rebel T1i Lens: EF28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM ISO Speed: 100 Focal Length: 95mm Exposure Value: 0 Aperture: f/5.6 Shutter Speed: 1/400 sec. Flash: Off, did not fire Post-processing: turned to black and white

abyssinia, henry

abyssinia, henry
Made by mlsj
One of the 19 statues that are part of the Korean War Veterans Memorial located in Washington D.C. The Korean War was fought between 1950 and 1953. The war began on June 25, 1950 and ended in a cease-fire on July 27, 1953. The memorial was dedicated on July 27, 1995 on the 42nd anniversary of the end of the war. 628,833 soldiers were killed 1,644,453 soldiers were wounded 92,970 soldiers were captured 470, 267 soldiers are missing

Choose life.

Choose life.
Made by p2wy
You'd think living in a house surrounded by memorials to thousands of war-dead would cause a President to think twice before *choosing* to send young men and women into battle. I guess that's the difference between us and Bush... he doesn't think. Or maybe he does think and has gotten what he wanted. Either way, his foreign policy has killed more Americans this century than Al Qaeda has. Korean War Memorial. Washington, DC.

Korean War Memorial, take 2

Korean War Memorial, take 2
Made by Andrew Fritz
I decided to make another attempt at a panorama of the Korean war memorial. This time I was there with much better light (5:00 PM with scattered clouds) and I decided to do a HDR image. I ended up having to rush as a park police officer politely told me I wasn't allowed to use a tripod (which is incorrect from my understanding of the law)... I rushed to finish instead of waiting for the crowd to move into each image.



Nearest places of interest:

John Ericsson National Memorial
Arlington Memorial Bridge
US Park Police Stables
West Potomac Park
  Vietnam Women's memorial
Constitution Gardens
Marian Anderson&039;s Performance
Statue : The Three Servicemen (aka The Three Soldiers)

PanoramioFlickr CC