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Ipswich

Interesting places in Ipswich:
Suffolk Showground   Ipswich railway station
Ipswich Freighliner Depot   Christchurch Park
Foxhall Stadium   Portman Road
Christchurch Mansion   Information Centre
Orwell Bridge   University Campus Suffolk
Neptune Square Apts   Bramford Lane Recreation Ground
Salthouse Harbour Hotel   Ipswich Hospital
Ipswich Bus Station   Rushmere Golf Club
Endeavour House   Ipswich Village Car Park
Ipswich Corn Exchange   Sir Bobby Robson Stand
Neptune Marina Apartments   London Road Allotments
New Portman Road Car Park   Cobbald Stand
Brittania Stand  

Ipswich (pronounced /|IpswItS/) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. It has a population of approximately 140,000 inhabitants (est. 2006) and is the third-largest town in the United Kingdom's East Anglia region, and the 38th largest urban area in England.^

Location is derived from the great work of WikiMapia

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Ipswich Underground: Margaret Catchpole

Ipswich Underground: Margaret Catchpole
Made by Simon_K
Margaret Catchpole Underground Station, Cliff Lane, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Margaret Catchpole: The most spectacular station on the Ipswich Underground system. Built with Russian money donated by the Soviet government. IUR were encouraged to name the station after a local hero in the Russian style, and Mayakovsky built the station in mock-Tudor after spending several weeks travelling around East Anglia looking at stately homes. The main entrance led into a concourse, and then stairways led down to a single platform with trains in both directions to Gainsborough and California. This station is only a few hundred metres from Brewery station, but is high on the hill above it. Consequently, a long stairway led down from one station to the other. However, few residents of this pleasant middle-class suburb were brewery workers or dockers, and so it was rarely used. The original fixings for the Ipswich Underground sign and logo can still be seen on the frontage below the chimney. Constructed: 1933 Architect: Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovsky Closed: 1950 Current use: public house and local authority secret underground bunker Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: Cornhill

Ipswich Underground: Cornhill
Made by Simon_K
Cornhill Underground Station, Tavern Street, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Cornhill: Though by no means the largest station in the system, Cornhill station served the centre of Ipswich town. There were two separate entrances; this was the main one on Tavern Street, and there was also a side entrance on Lloyds Avenue. This station is largely unrecognisable today, only the grand Art Deco facade surviving. On the pediment at the top you can still just make out the fixings which held the Underground sign. Before Burtons gutted the facade, it was a fine wooden facade in a kind of Tudor Art Deco style. The same thing still survives on a smaller scale at the entrance. The architect was Hector Munro Cautley, a leading Ipswich architect of the day. The main entrance led into a ticket hall, and then stairways led down to four platforms for the two lines which met below Cornhill. None of this survives today, although the space below the station is used by Lloyds Bank next door for storage. Constructed: 1926 Architect: H Munro Cautley Closed: 1968 Current use: Burtons shop and underground storage Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: Fore Hamlet

Ipswich Underground: Fore Hamlet
Made by Simon_K
Fore Hamlet Underground Station, Duke Street, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Fore Hamlet: Surely the most spectacular of the Ipswich Underground stations, Fore Hamlet was built in 1934 with the aid of money donated by the Russian government. It came just four years after the mean, spartan Brewery station, and shows how the fortunes of the system had changed in that time. It was quite the biggest station in the system. There were several reasons for the station's size; not least, this station served the massive Ransome's Orwell Works, as well as other dockside industries. Perhaps ten thousand workers a day used Fore Hamlet station. Additionally, three lines came together here before heading towards Cornhill. Trains from Brewery, California and St Helen's jockeyed for a place on the two platforms before moving on to the town centre. Constructed: 1934 Architect: Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovsky Closed: 1950 Current use: Loch Fyne at Mortimers restaurant Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: Cornhill

Ipswich Underground: Cornhill
Made by Simon_K
Cornhill Underground Station (side entrance), Lloyds Avenue, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Cornhill: Though by no means the largest station in the system, Cornhill station served the centre of Ipswich town. There were two separate entrances; the main one on Tavern Street, and another on Lloyds Avenue. However, the main entrance is unrecognisable today, while this side entrance is the best reminder of the Ipswich Underground still surviving in the town centre. The architect was Hector Munro Cautley, a leading Ipswich architect of the day. Both station entrances were faced in wood in a kind of Tudor Art Deco style. The main doors of this entrance were where the cash machine hall on the left is today. The small-paned window of the ticket office survives near the centre. Amazingly, the tobacconist's shop on the far right was here when this was a busy underground station. Constructed: 1926 Architect: H Munro Cautley Closed: 1968 Current use: Bank offices and underground storage Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: surviving track

Ipswich Underground: surviving track
Made by Simon_K
Ipswich Underground, surviving track, New Cut East, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 New Cut East: This is the only stretch of track known to survive from the Ipswich Underground Railway - or, at least, all that can be seen today. It lies above ground where the trains surfaced on New Cut East after leaving Brewery station. In the background of this picture the lines joined the track which carried cargo around the wet dock, and then both lines crossed Bridge Street to run north of the river, crossing it at Ranelagh Road to make a connection with Ipswich main line railway station. Another line from Brewery continued underground to Fore Hamlet and Cornhill. As this was the town centre station, that line was more popular than this one, which was only ever used by people travelling from east Ipswich to the main line station. However, congestion at the Ranelagh Road crossing often caused delays, which threw out the timetables of the whole underground system. Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: Brewery

Ipswich Underground: Brewery
Made by Simon_K
Brewery Underground Station, Landseer Road, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Brewery: As its name suggests, Brewery station served the large workforce of the Tolly Cobbold brewery, as well as the industry which was already beginning to spread along Cliff Quay in the 1930s. A simple, Art Deco structure, the entrance end has been blocked off to form what looks like a stage. Behind this, stairs led down to a single platform which served trains in both directions. The simplicity of the design reflects the clean lines of the period, but also is a reminder that the Cobbold family, who owned the land, refused to make any contribution to the costs, despite the station serving their workforce. This was the last station to be constructed before Russian money restored the system to a brief splendour in the 1930s. Constructed: 1930 Architect: IUR planning office Closed: 1950 Current use: Electricity substation Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: St Matthew's

Ipswich Underground: St Matthew's
Made by Simon_K
St Matthew's Underground Station, St Matthew's Street, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 St Matthew's: This building is worth a second glance, because it is the oldest surviving station of the Ipswich Underground Railway. Indeed, it is the only structure remaining which was put up before 1922, when the government handed over control of the system to the Borough Council, and the name was changed from the Eastern Underground Railway to the Ipswich Underground Railway. Inside the grand facade, a simple concourse had stairs on both sides leading down to platforms for Cornhill and Westbourne. These platforms are believed to survive almost in their entirety, including original advertising hoardings. EUR logos also survive inside the building, which has now been disused and inaccessible for almost half a century. Constructed: 1921 Architect: Marriott and Sons Closed: 1960 Current use: disused Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: Halifax Quay

Ipswich Underground: Halifax Quay
Made by Simon_K
part of Halifax Quay Underground Station, Wherstead Road, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Halifax Quay:The two storey control block on the left is all that survives of Halifax Quay station, one of the first stations on the system to be built. It served the large workforce of Cocksedges Engineering on the other side of Wherstead Road, and thousands of workers used the station every day. The white tunnel on the far right led through to the platform, and stairs led up the bank above to another platform on the main line. In 2006, it was still possible to make out these ghostly steps beneath the undergrowth. Constructed: 1922 Architect: Ipswich Borough planning dept. Closed: 1954 Current use: derelict Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: Westbourne

Ipswich Underground: Westbourne
Made by Simon_K
Westbourne Underground Station, Sherrington Road, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Westbourne: Westbourne is the last surviving station on the generally poorly-served west side of Ipswich. A simple modernist block with a two storey entrance, the station controller's office sat above the doors. There was another entrance on the other side of the building. Inside, a stairway led down to a single platform with ticket machines, which served trains in both directions. This station was probably busiest in the summer, when people got off here to use the adjacent Broom Hill swimming pool. Constructed: 1930 Architect: IUR planning office Closed: 1950 Current use: Library with book storage underground Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: Birkfield relay

Ipswich Underground: Birkfield relay
Made by Simon_K
Birkfield radio relay, Birkfield Drive, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Birkfield relay: because the main control centre for the Underground Railway system was in the far east of the town at Gainsborough, a radio transmitter was used to control traffic on the south side of the river. The radio waves were picked up by antennae on this box-like structure on the hill above the town centre, and then a system of wheels, pulleys and hydraulic tubes would operate the signals and tracks on the south and west of the town. The radio signals were prone to weakness in foggy weather, resulting in considerable delays. Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: power station

Ipswich Underground: power station
Made by Simon_K
Ipswich Underground Railway power generation plant, Cemetery Lane, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Power Station: As an electric railway from the very start, Ipswich Underground needed its own power station to guard against power shortages at busy times. This handsome power generation plant was built on the north side of town to the designs of celebrated Ipswich architect H Munro Cautley. After the closure of the IUR, it continued to provide power to the north side of the Borough until into the 1970s. Constructed: 1928 Architect: H Munro Cautley Closed: 1974 Current use: Crematorium chapel Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: surviving collonade

Ipswich Underground: surviving collonade
Made by Simon_K
Ipswich Underground Railway collonade, Orwell Quay, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Collonades: One of the striking hallmarks of the Ipswich Underground Railway was the use of cast iron collonades of pillars to front platforms. Made by Ransomes at their Orwell Works, the pillars supported the floor above, but also provided a grand spectacle along the platform. These pillars, painted in the familiar maroon and sapphire livery of the IUR, are now stacked forlornly in a junkyard by Orwell Quay. They probably came from Brewery station. Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

Ipswich Underground: central office

Ipswich Underground: central office
Made by Simon_K
Ipswich Underground Railway offices, High Street, Ipswich A guide to the former stations of the Ipswich Underground Railway, uploaded April 1st, 2007 Central Offices: The central offices of the Ipswich Underground Railway were located at the top of High Street, beside Ipswich Museum. At its peak, the IUR employed nearly four hundred men and women. The crest of the Ipswich Underground Railway survives above the main entrance. Constructed: 1929 Architect: H Munro Cautley Closed: 1950 Current use: apartments Ipswich Underground Railway: Little survives today of the former Ipswich Underground Railway, but once its tunnels and platforms thronged with Ipswich people travelling beneath the streets of their proud town. Today, the tunnels are filled in and the stations have found other uses, but still the memories remain. For more information, and a brief history of the Ipswich Underground Railway, visit www.ipswich-Underground.co.uk

West Yorkshire refugee in Ipswich

West Yorkshire refugee in Ipswich
Made by Renown
The slightly awkward lines of an ex Leeds Roe bodied Leyland Atlantean are aided (IMHO) by Ipswich's fabulous traditional high quality livery. The attention to detail with the tramway style fleet numbers aids the dependable appearance of the fleet. I'm not sure of the reasons why UNW 403H and some it's sisters found themselves here around 1980, but it provided additional photographic variety. Across the road from here was another, but still wearing it's former owners colours. AEC swifts had provided the necessary impetus for me to visit, and several can be seen here with a Willowbrook bodied example to the right. Shortly after this I attempted to buy a small number of them for my then employer, but the Municipal fleet wasn't in a position to let them go as they were experiencing delays in delivery and troubles with their replacements. The picture was taken at the famed 'Electric House' terminus.

Please dismount, and again, and again

Please dismount, and again, and again
Made by Peter Ito
On this 400 meter section of cycle route one is asked to dismount countless times. You can see about 4 sets of signs in this short section alone! I understand the council going to change it, but it does show some of the daft things that can have money spent on them. You will be able to see the logic.. the pedestrians are on the right and have to cross the cycle lane from the path coming in from the left, so cyclists have to get off so no-one dies (which is a bit of an overreaction I feel). However it would actually have been a lot more sensible to have swapped the lanes so there isn't a conflict in the first place or to have trusted people to sort it out themselves without micro-management

The knives of Hell.

The knives of Hell.
Made by Jenkins.Tom
Gosh finally some new photography. I haven't been neglecting Flickr, I've been checking all your lovely lots work and its all been amazing keep it up. So heres me getting back in the swing off it after like a month due to our end of year show at college i've been busy and i've been doing other photography for monies ;) So this is suppose to be linked to my new brief Dantes Inferno, this is the violent & anger side of it. I tried a few things and like usual they didn't work, but I've got like till September to get it right. Comments & Feedback. C'mon I'm ready for it. P.s yes I am sporting a wolverine like beard and hair.

Harwich British Rail cartrain 1985 Mat Transport

Harwich British Rail cartrain 1985 Mat Transport
Made by fpo22p
Class 47 Brush diesel hauled car train waiting on the down at CO313 Ipswich 1985. Ford assembled cars in Germany and Belgium and were moved through Harwich docks by cartics to be processed at Dagenham.This one at at Ipswich could be on its way elsewhere or may have been diverted.. Vauxhall G.M. Ford and British Leyland had regular runs to and from Harwich and the continent during the seventies and eighties. Harwich lost most of this work when the channel tunnel was opened. See Radars pic here of the Harwich end at the time Sadly Ford of Dagenham only make diesel engines now and G.M no longer make cars at Luton.

This took far too long

This took far too long
Made by Andrew Culture
After taking a couple of hours out of my morning only to have the camera misfire when Cefer Cat jumped off the roof TWICE (that's her landing on the shed), and Rinny apparently fly into her own bottom I've decided I'll probably call it a day on my flying cat photos (for now). Skibbs cat didn't like the look of what was going on at all, and appeared to be scared of the shutter noise and legged it! I managed to make a short video showing how they fly, here - http://lawsie.blogspot.com/2009/03/proof-my-cats-can-fly.html

Magic Shoes Black Patent Leather Stiletto Ankle Boots.

Magic Shoes Black Patent Leather Stiletto Ankle Boots.
Made by Sleepystilettos
Brand: Magic Shoes. Style: Ankle boot. Colour: Black. Finish: Patent. Upper: Leather. Lining: Leather. Sole: Synthetic. Additional Details: The boots on display here have five outside silver skull fastening buckles. Fastening: Zip up front and five buckles. Heel Height: 3.75 inches. Platform Height: N/A. Size: 4 UK. Country of Origin: England. Year: 1997. Occasion: Going out boots. Videos: 1. “Gothic Boots for Black Fairy” www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1SV3ygozeA

March of the Cranes

March of the Cranes
Made by robert_a_dickinson
This crane has been positioned opposite the Willis buiding in Ipswich, Suffolk (UK). When walking past the building I noticed that the crane was reflected multiple times in the glass of the building - they looked like they were marching across the front of the building. I couldnt resist this shot. The Willis building was designed by Sir Norman Foster and constructed in the 1970's. Its design was ahead of its time and it is also a Grade II listed building. For an aerial view see El Birko's photo.

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Nearest places of interest:

Back Hamlet Allotments
Siloam Place
Derby Road Railway Station
44 Celestion Drive
  KERALA STORE
Newbury Road recreation ground
Alexandra Road Allotments
DVLA Test Centre

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