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Heckington

the Heckington is part of Howell, United Kingdom.

Interesting places in Heckington:
Heckington railway station   Heckington Windmill


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Heckington 8-sailed Windmill

Heckington 8-sailed Windmill
Made by ♫ Claire ♫
Heckington Windmill is the only 8-sailed tower windmill still standing in the United Kingdom with its sails intact. The mill stands very close to Heckington Railway Station, hence its previous name of the Station Mill in the 19th century. It was built in 1830 to plans by millwright Edward Ingeldew for her first owner and founder Michael Hare of red brick, the outer walls being tarred (with a black bitumen paint in order to successfully keep moisture out), as a five-sailed windmill with Sutton's single patent sails (15 feet tip-width and 12 feet heel-width) providing longitudinal shutters on both sides of the backs (36 feet in length). The mill has six storeys called floors: ground floor, meal floor, stone (stage) floor, lower bin floor, upper bin floor (hoist floor), dust or cap floor. At that time the five-armed sail-cross drove three pairs of stones and milled grain for a 60-year period of time. But Mr Hare already died in 1834, and the mill handed over to Mr Sleighton Nash and then to Mr Joseph Nash who became its last miller before its defunction in 1890. A horrible tail-wind made the sails run backwards after the destruction of the fantail by lightning leaving the cap rotating uncontrolled, blew off the entire cap with the curb smashing it with parts of the upper gear and all the five sails to pieces, and destroyed the tower rim. Mr Nash had to abandoned the wrecked mill. In 1891 Mr John Pocklington of Wyberton mill had bought the eight-sailed mill cap with gear of the 78-year-old defunct Tuxford's mill (built in 1813 at Skirbeck) for just £72 at auction in Boston without any plans. As a condition of the deal, he had to remove all the machinery from the mill site. So he was in an urgent need for a suitable mill stump to mount the cap on, as he had no place to put his new acquisition. Luckily he came across the wrecked Heckington mill, bought it subsequently, and, from 1891 until early 1892, he fitted the white onion-shaped and fantail-driven Tuxford's Mill cap to the Heckington Mill and set it working for the following 54 years. Later on he installed a large circular saw-mill in a shed on one side, also driven by wind-power using line-shafts. It was used to make elm boards for coffins. John Pocklington was very successful in milling, baking, building, sawing, and farming. In that time and even up today the mill was also called the Pocklington's Mill. After John Pocklington's death in 1941 the mill stopped working in 1946 for the next 40 years. The shutters (shades in Lincs) were removed from the sails. In 1953 the mill came into the hands of Kesteven County Council who made the first restorations preventing the fine old mill from being dismantled and restoring it as a rare landmark. Only four of the eight sails could be installed (from the Old Bolingbroke and Wainfleet St Mary mills, ~ 22/25 miles north east of Heckington). When the mill changed hands to Lincolnshire County Council in 1986 the mill was finally restored to working order (the repairs included the construction of 192 new shades and four new sails sustained by the Friends of Heckington Mill, with the new sails cross weighing five tons. The cap's overhang assures the fact it is from a mill with a much wider tower top. As a rare feature with post and smock mills (Dutch type mills) and common with sail windmills (with pole-shaped sailstocks and triangular sails) such as around the Mediterranean Sea) the sail-tips are linked together by steel rods or cables to prevent sagging in the sails, a probably unnecessary work with this kind of mill sails. Parts of the bigger timber wheels have iron teeth instead of wooden ones. Among the six floors the third one being the lower of the two bin floors provides two grain cleaners (a modern one driven by an electric motor and the other an old wind-driven separator. On the second floor, the stone and stage floor, there are the original three pairs of stones (two pairs of grey and one pair of French quartzite stones) and a drive down to the first floor with a fourth pair of stones. On the ground floor a fifth pair of stones was installed which could also be driven by wind if desired or rather by engine. The mill houses a mixer on the first floor and in addition an elevator from the ground floor. Due to its large sail area supplied by its eight sails and its well-winded site the mill is able to drive four pairs of millstones - now 2 pairs of French (quartzite) stones and 2 pairs of so called Peak stones (Derbyshire sandstone) and is able to work in very light breezes, when other local mills don't. An additional dresser is used to make white flour from time to time. Now the distinctive eight-sails windmill is run by the Friends of Heckington Mill and was reopened in 1986. In 2004 the mill underwent its last larger restoration.

Forgetfulness

Forgetfulness
Made by Bashed
Chocolate holiday weekend always extends to Monday and we always look for something different to do, different from everyone else that is. Bank holiday Mondays usually mean that wherever you go, it will be busy. To beat the crowds, we decided to go for a walk in the countryside. It worked too, we barely saw another soul. Our walk began here at Heckington Train station and ended at Sleaford Train station. The idea is, you do the walk and then catch the train back to the car. The walk took us over the railway line a couple of times and that gave us the reassuring sight of trains running along the track every hour or so, after all, you don't want to arrive and find out the trains are not running, not after a seven mile walk across fields at least. the walk took 3 and a half hours and was very hard work. We were very happy to see the train arrive only 3 minutes after we reached our destination. So Neil, why call this picture forgetfulness? Good question flickerers. The reason is the same reason that this picture looks very cramped. We remembered our map, our water, our chocolate and our walking boots and even my camera, sadly I forgot to change my lens and only took my 105 instead of my very capable 18-200 zoom. Sigh!

Heckington Windmill

Heckington Windmill
Made by jonbradbury
Originally built as a five-sailed windmill, but the original sails were destroyed by a tail wind in 1890. In 1891-92 Heckington Windmill was fitted with the eight sailed cap from Tuxford mill, and it now has the honour of being the last remaining eight-sail windmill in Britain.

WINDMILL HECKINGTON, LINCOLNSHIRE

WINDMILL HECKINGTON, LINCOLNSHIRE
Made by ZACERIN
This is the only eight-sailed mill in England. The original mill on this site was built by Michael Hare in 1830. The eight sails and cap were brought by John Pocklington from Boston in 1892. The Kesteven County Council bought the mill in 1953 & subsequently restored it

Heckington

Heckington
Made by BarkingBill
A proliferation of signage. Confusingly, there is only one exit from this platform - that is by following the 'way out' sign and crossing the line. Immediately above this 'way out' sign is another sign warning you not to cross the line! 19th May 2011

Windmill no.70 - Hecklington Windmill, Lincolnshire, UK

Windmill no.70 - Hecklington Windmill, Lincolnshire, UK
Made by peter.brabham
Note the 8 sails Location: www.streetmap.co.uk/oldmap.srf?x=514550&y=343550&...

Heckington

Heckington
Made by BarkingBill
EMT Express Sprinter no. 158783 calls at the delightful GNR station at Heckington with the 09.55 Nottingham to Skegness. Heckington's famous eight sail windmill makes a pleasing backdrop to the scene. 19th May 2011

Tiny Simnel Cake

Tiny Simnel Cake
Made by perdysha
Gran didn't bake a Simnel cake this year and I was doing one for Mum and I and I thought that I'd make a small one for Gran, so I made one in a baked bean tin. Obviously I removed the beans first....

Heckington Windmill

Heckington Windmill
Made by coanri
Heckington Windmill is the only 8-sailed tower windmill still standing in the United Kingdom with its sails intact. Heckington is located about midway between Sleaford and Boston in Lincolnshire.

47727 Heckington

47727 Heckington
Made by Nigel 53 milepost
Colas, Class 47 No. 47727 'Rebecca' is seen powering away from Heckington along the single line section to Sleaford, with loaded steel working 6M57 13.14 Boston Docks - Washwoodheath, 28/09/11

Village Green: Cars ONLY

Village Green: Cars ONLY
Made by londoninflames
I think this deserves to be in displaced/misplaced because it simply doesn't make sense. We're dealing with a village that has the audacity to pretend its car park is a village green!

PICT4543

PICT4543
Made by perdysha
I had seen this sunset in my rear view mirrors on the way home from work. As soon as I got home I ran upstairs and grabbed my camera and ran outside into the garden to take photos.

Back

Back
Made by Bashed
I decided to finish off my 7 mile walk series in one go, so here are the last 6. It took 3 and a half hours to walk from here to Sleaford and 8 minutes to get back...

Pocklington's Mill

Pocklington's Mill
Made by Boxley
Pocklington's Mill at Heckington, Lincolnshire. This is the only eight sail windmill remaining in England and was built in 1830 and was restored in 1985.

Heckington Windmill

Heckington Windmill
Made by james perkins.
The only surviving eight sailed windmill in the country, located on the B1394 at Hecklngton, Sleaford, Lincolnshire. Sat-Nav NG34 9JW.

Heckington Windmill

Heckington Windmill
Made by Malcolm R Bell
Yes, that windmill really does have 8 sails - its the only one left in working order in the country. Photographed on a very grey day

Heckington Signal Box and Windmill

Heckington Signal Box and Windmill
Made by ♫ Claire ♫
Opened in 1876, Heckington Signal Box represents one of the most attractive and elegant designs used by the Great Northern Railway.

Heckington

Heckington
Made by BarkingBill
EMT Express Sprinter no. 158783 departs from Heckington on the 09.55 Nottingham to Skegness. 19th May 2011

Heckington

Heckington
Made by BarkingBill
EMT Super Sprinter no. 156413 arrives at Heckington on the 10.15 Skegness - Nottingham. 19th May 2011

Heckington

Heckington
Made by BarkingBill
Heckington Station. Gates open and signals off for the 10.15 Skegness - Nottingham DMU. 19th May 2011



Nearest places of interest:

Helpringham
Scredington
Heckington Windmill
Heckington railway station
  Special Munitions Store
Tattershall Castle
Kirkby La Thorpe
Evedon

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