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Former CNJ Newark Bay Drawbridge



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Jersey Central RR Newark Bay Bridge & Disaster

Jersey Central RR Newark Bay Bridge & Disaster
Made by jeffs4653
You are looking at all that remains of the Newark Bay Bridge of the Central Railroad of New Jersey. This was a 1.3 mile four track railroad bridge that had four main lift spans. The bridge connected Elizabethport (opposite side) and Bayonne at the southern end of Newark Bay. It is also the location of one of the worst railroad disasters in the US. On the morning of September 15, 1958 a Central Railroad of New Jersey commuter train, #3314, ran through a restrictive signal, followed by a stop signal, and ran off the open Newark Bay lift bridge. Both diesel locomotives and the first two coaches plunged into Newark Bay and sank immediately, killing 48 people. A third coach, snagged by its rear truck, hung precariously off the lift bridge for two hours before it also toppled into the water. As the locomotive crew was killed, the cause of the accident was never determined, but a medical emergency in the cab was theorized. There were three signals spaced at three-quarters of a mile, a quarter of a mile, and 500 feet (150 m) from the draw bridge, and an automatic derailing device fifty feet beyond the third signal. The bridge span had to be down and locked electrically before the signals and derail devices could be cleared for movement on the tracks. Conversely, all the devices had to be in their most restrictive positions before the bridge could be unlocked and raised. Train #3314 ran through two signals and was derailed. The automatic derailer was designed to knock the wheels off the track so that the resistance of the ties against the train's wheels would bring a slow moving derailed train to a stop. Train #3314, although derailed, was moving at such a great speed that it did not have sufficient distance to stop before plunging off the bridge. An autopsy found that the engineer, 63-year-old Lloyd Wilburn, had indications of hypertensive heart disease, but that he had died of asphyxia due to drowning. However, no reason could be found to explain why fireman Peter Andrew, 42, could not or did not stop the train. Investigators raised the wreckage and did not find any defect of the braking system on the locomotives and coaches; it was also determined that the signal system and derailing device on the bridge had functioned properly. Lacking more definitive evidence, it was presumed that the engineer had somehow become incapacitated in the cab and the fireman failed to take appropriate action to stop the train. Three separate inquiries found that the absence of a dead man's control was one primary cause of the accident. After the inquiries, the New Jersey Public Utilities Commission ordered the railroads to install such devices on all passenger locomotives operating in New Jersey. Forty-eight people died in the wreck, including former New York Yankees second baseman George Snuffy Stirnweiss and James Carmalt Adams, the brother-in-law of author Kurt Vonnegut. The two locomotives, #1532 and #1526, were raised, rebuilt by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors, and returned to service. #1532 retained its original number, while the #1526 was renumbered #1531. They served primarily as freight locomotives, although the #1532 was photographed in passenger service after its return from EMD. The Newark Bay lift bridge was last used during 1978 after which it was determined to be a hazard to navigation and was demolished during the 1980s. These concrete pylons are all that remain.

Remnants of demolished CRRNJ Newark Bay Bridge, Bayonne New Jersey

Remnants of demolished CRRNJ Newark Bay Bridge, Bayonne New Jersey
Made by jag9889
The Central Railroad of New Jersey constructed a four track railroad bridge that consisted of four main lift spans, opening in 1926, replacing an outdated two track span built in 1901. The bridge connected Elizabethport and Bayonne at the southern end of Newark Bay. The designer of this bridge was J.A.L. Waddell. On September 15, 1958, a commuter train plunged off the south span which had been opened for marine traffic, killing 48 people, including former New York Yankees second baseman Snuffy Stirnweiss. In 1966 the French freighter S.S. Washington collided with the north east lift span, rendering two tracks unusable. When the Aldene Plan went into effect in May of 1967 the only passenger service on the bridge was the Bayonne-Cranford shuttle, known commonly as the Scoot. The last freight train crossed the bridge in 1976 just prior to the formation of Conrail, and the last passenger train left Bayonne's Eighth Street Station on August 6, 1978. Despite Bayonne's efforts to save the bridge, demolition of the central lift spans began in July 1980 after the Coast Guard declared the structure a navigational hazard to ships. The trestle and approaches were removed in 1987-1988 when it became apparent that a replacement span was no longer feasible [Source en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CRRNJ_Newark_Bay_Bridge]

Newark Bay

Newark Bay
Made by jeffs4653
Panoramic view of Newark Bay from the location of the former Jersey Central Bay Bridge. View looking north. Port Newark, and the container cranes, can be seen on the other side of the bay.

Rusty Rail

Rusty Rail
Made by jeffs4653
The remains of a rail, exposed to decades of salt water, extending from the ruins of a concrete pier on Newark Bay. This was probably once a car float dock for the Central Railroad of NJ.

Sunken 1

Sunken 1
Made by jeffs4653
The sunken remains of ? It appears to be some sort of hopper and dispensing device. It was sunk several hundred feet off shore.

Abandoned Industrial Structure in Newark Bay, Bayonne New Jersey

Abandoned Industrial Structure in Newark Bay, Bayonne New Jersey
Made by jag9889
If anyone has a clue what this is, please let me know - thanks!

Bergen Point Industrial Area with Bayonne Bridge

Bergen Point Industrial Area with Bayonne Bridge
Made by jag9889
Location: Bayonne NJ

forld-2

forld-2
Made by Morton Fox
Bayonne, NJ

forld-3

forld-3
Made by Morton Fox
Bayonne, NJ

forld-4

forld-4
Made by Morton Fox
Bayonne, NJ

Remnants of demolished CRRNJ Newark Bay Bridge, Bayonne New Jersey

Remnants of demolished CRRNJ Newark Bay Bridge, Bayonne New Jersey
Made by jag9889
The Central Railroad of New Jersey constructed a four track railroad bridge that consisted of four main lift spans, opening in 1926, replacing an outdated two track span built in 1901. The bridge connected Elizabethport and Bayonne at the southern end of Newark Bay. The designer of this bridge was J.A.L. Waddell. On September 15, 1958, a commuter train plunged off the south span which had been opened for marine traffic, killing 48 people, including former New York Yankees second baseman Snuffy Stirnweiss. In 1966 the French freighter S.S. Washington collided with the north east lift span, rendering two tracks unusable. When the Aldene Plan went into effect in May of 1967 the only passenger service on the bridge was the Bayonne-Cranford shuttle, known commonly as the Scoot. The last freight train crossed the bridge in 1976 just prior to the formation of Conrail, and the last passenger train left Bayonne's Eighth Street Station on August 6, 1978. Despite Bayonne's efforts to save the bridge, demolition of the central lift spans began in July 1980 after the Coast Guard declared the structure a navigational hazard to ships. The trestle and approaches were removed in 1987-1988 when it became apparent that a replacement span was no longer feasible [Source en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CRRNJ_Newark_Bay_Bridge]

Remnants of demolished CRRNJ Newark Bay Bridge, Bayonne New Jersey

Remnants of demolished CRRNJ Newark Bay Bridge, Bayonne New Jersey
Made by jag9889
The Central Railroad of New Jersey constructed a four track railroad bridge that consisted of four main lift spans, opening in 1926, replacing an outdated two track span built in 1901. The bridge connected Elizabethport and Bayonne at the southern end of Newark Bay. The designer of this bridge was J.A.L. Waddell. On September 15, 1958, a commuter train plunged off the south span which had been opened for marine traffic, killing 48 people, including former New York Yankees second baseman Snuffy Stirnweiss. In 1966 the French freighter S.S. Washington collided with the north east lift span, rendering two tracks unusable. When the Aldene Plan went into effect in May of 1967 the only passenger service on the bridge was the Bayonne-Cranford shuttle, known commonly as the Scoot. The last freight train crossed the bridge in 1976 just prior to the formation of Conrail, and the last passenger train left Bayonne's Eighth Street Station on August 6, 1978. Despite Bayonne's efforts to save the bridge, demolition of the central lift spans began in July 1980 after the Coast Guard declared the structure a navigational hazard to ships. The trestle and approaches were removed in 1987-1988 when it became apparent that a replacement span was no longer feasible [Source en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CRRNJ_Newark_Bay_Bridge]



Nearest places of interest:

第五大道
Wolong Area
Coastal Oil
West New Brighton (Staten Island, NY)
  16th Street Park
Bayonne High School
华慧公寓
South Gate of Forest Park Station - Subway Line 8

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