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Fitzgerald/Ginsberg Mansion

Fitzgerald/Ginsberg Mansion
Made by Emilio Guerra
145-15 Bayside Avenue, Flushing, Queens, New York City, New York, United States Summary The Fitzgerald/Ginsberg Mansion is a rare 1920s, picturesque Tudor Revival style mansion in Flushing, Queens designed by architect John Oakman. Constructed in 1924, it features rusticated, irregularly shaped fieldstone walls, a multi-colored slate roof, casement and leaded glass windows, and picturesque massing. Large, suburban picturesque revival-style houses from the 1920s were at one time prevalent throughout New York City’s affluent residential outer neighborhoods, but have become increasingly rare. The Fitzgerald house is one of the last great mansions from this period still standing in Flushing. The house represents the affluence and optimism of the 1920s. It was built immediately adjacent to an extension of Flushing’s Old Country Club and its golf course – a typical suburban pattern of those years. The Old Country Club, founded in 1887, built its golf course in 1902. It is credited as being one of the oldest private country clubs in the United States. The club house and golf course have since been demolished. The architect of the house, John Oakman worked for Carrere & Hastings and then formed a partnership with W. Powell before starting his own practice in 1909, specializing in picturesque single family houses. The house was built for Charles and Florence Fitzgerald, who sold it in 1926 to Ethel and Morris Ginsberg. Ginsberg made his fortune as part of a family-owned business supplying sash, door and wooden trim for builders. The firm was considered to be one of the leaders in this field in the Long Island region. The Ginsberg family lived in the house for over seventy years. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS The Development of Flushing One of the oldest settlements within what is now the City of New York – and together with Newtown and Jamaica one of the three colonial settlements now comprising the borough of Queens – Flushing traces its roots to English settlers who received a patent in 1654 from Pieter Stuyvesant, governor of the Dutch colony. Early in the town’s history, Flushing residents stood together in support of a local Quaker community against the religious intolerance of Governor Stuyvesant. They lost the immediate battle, but their “Flushing Remonstrance” of 1657 stands as one of the earliest published defenses of religious freedom in the United States. During the 17th century, Flushing began to develop as a major center for horticulture, an industry brought to the town by French Huguenots who imported fruit trees not native to the country. William Prince established Flushing’s first profitable nursery as early as 1737. In 1838, Samuel Parsons established a nursery that introduced to the United States such plants as the Asiatic rhododendron, the Japanese maple, the Valencia orange, and the weeping beech. Parsons’ nursery also provided trees for the city’s first public parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park. As in the rest of Queens County, Flushing’s fortunes evolved with improvements in transportation. The introduction of regular train service to New York City in 1854 led to a post-Civil War boom in luxury house construction for wealthy New Yorkers. The extension of trolley lines into Flushing from 1888 to 1899, and the electrification of the Long Island Rail Road, helped turn Flushing into a commuter suburb. With the consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, Flushing became part of the new Borough of Queens. From the 1890s until the outbreak of World War I, Flushing’s estates were divided up into new suburban developments including Ingleside, Murray Hill, Broadway-Flushing, Bowne Park, Kissena, and Queensborough Hill. Perhaps the biggest impetus to the growth of Flushing in particular and Queens in general was the opening in 1909 of the Queensborough Bridge connecting Queens with midtown Manhattan, followed by the extension of the IRT into the borough during the late 1910s. Over the next two decades, the population of Queens mushroomed by 750%. The boom continued well into the 1920s. Flushing participated heavily in the borough’s growth, developing as a series of suburban neighborhoods surrounding a town center on Northern Boulevard. In 1910, just a year after the opening of the Queensborough Bridge, the Business Men’s Association of Flushing published Flushing: The Premier Suburban Colony of the City of New York, a typical booster book touting the suburban advantages of Flushing life: Flushing has long waited to come into its own. Thousands of people who have enjoyed the luxuries of living in a community like this, where the home life, the social life, and the religious life are at their best, where rowing, yachting, fishing, tennis, golfing, baseball, driving, motoring, and other outdoor amusements are easy at hand and universally indulged in, have in the past found homes in Flushing, regardless of its inaccessibility to Manhattan. These people have preferred to put up with the annoyance, loss of time, and trouble in getting to and from their homes rather than suffer the inconveniences and disadvantages of a home in Manhattan or Brooklyn. Now that the Pennsylvania Tunnels are completed, and a resident of Flushing can go from his home to Herald Square in sixteen minutes, and without change of cars, now that the great Queensboro Bridge is open to traffic, and a Flushing resident can go for a single five-cent fare by trolley in the finest cars in New York over this bridge in thirty minutes, and with the prospect of the Steinway Tunnel being quickly opened, tens of thousands of New York City’s increasing population will take advantage of and enjoy the same invaluable privileges that have previously been the privilege of only thousands. The book extolled the neighborhood’s advantages in healthfulness, openness, good schools, water supply, and churches, and focused on its character as “a Colony of Homes”: Flushing is distinctly and pre-eminently a residence place. It is and always has been a colony of homes - homes of detached houses, homes with broad lawns, large gardens, shrubs, trees, flowers, and abundance of God's pure, fresh air and sunshine. It has no apartment houses, neither has it any of the settlements which are characteristic of other places where there is much manufacturing. Flushing is clean, wholesome, and restful to a degree possibly not equaled in any other suburb of New York. And the book proudly listed the prominent people who now called Flushing home, many of them New York City officials: In later days many…men of note in various walks of life have established homes in Flushing. It would be well-nigh impossible to enumerate them all, but among those more widely known are Dr. William H. Maxwell, City Superintendent of Schools; Hon. Kingsley L. Martin, Commissioner of Bridges; Mr. J. Vipond Davies, Engineer of the McAdoo Tunnels; Mr. Arthur J. Nash, Superintendent of the Tiffany Studios; Mr. Clarence M. Lowes, Treasurer of the Williamsburg Dime Savings Bank; Mr. William O. Wood, President and General Manager of the New York and Queens County Railway; Mr. Charles G. M. Thomas, General Manager of the New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company; Mr. Manley M. Gillam of the New York Herald; Mr. George N. Webster of the Wagner Palace Car Company; Mr. Foster Crowell, former Commissioner of Street Cleaning; Mr. David L. Van Nostrand, former County Clerk; Mr. Ellis Parker Butler, the author; Tax Commissioner John J. Halleran; Commissioner of Education Rupert B. Thomas; Mr. Frank A. Collins, Deputy Superintendent of School Buildings; Major Thomas K. Boggs, Capt. F.A. Hinman, U.S.A., retired, Rev. Dr. George R. Van DeWater, rector of St Andrew's Church, Manhattan, and so on indefinitely. One of Flushing’s major attractions was the great variety of outdoor recreation available to its residents. As recounted in the Business Men’s Association publication of 1910: Recreation and Entertainment: There is no excuse for any one failing to enjoy himself in Flushing. The place affords every conceivable form of diversion, recreation, and entertainment. Flushing Bay and River provide bathing, fishing, rowing, yachting and motor boating, and skating in winter. The unsurpassed roads, nearly all bordered by great trees, lead to unnumbered picturesque localities. The Shore Road at Whitestone is so close to the water one could toss a biscuit to the decks of the Sound steamers as they sail majestically by. In particular, the existence of country clubs was considered a major advantage: The Flushing Country Club [the original name of what became the Old Country Club] has excellent tennis courts and golf links in Whitestone Avenue. Country clubs and golf clubs in suburban development and in Queens According to historian James M. Mayo, the first known country club was the Myopia Club organized in 1879 in Winchester, a suburb of Boston. In 1882, several members of the Myopia Club organized the Country Club at Clyde Park in Brookline, Massachusetts. According to the Brookline club’s invitation to members: The general idea is to have a comfortable clubhouse for the use of members with their families, a simple restaurant, bed-rooms, bowling-alley, lawn tennis grounds, etc.; also, to have race-meetings and, occasionally, music in the afternoon, and it is probable that a few gentlemen will club together to run a coach out every afternoon during the season, to convey members and their friends at a fixed charge. Mayo lists other early country clubs including “The Buffalo (1889), Powelton (1882), Richmond County (1888), St. Andrew's Golf (1888), and Tuxedo (1886) Country Clubs of New York, and the Town and Country Club (1888) of St. Paul, Minnesota….” By 1900, more than 1,000 such clubs had opened. Initially, their sporting activities focused on horse-racing, polo or lawn tennis. But before long, those sports had been supplanted by golf, which became enormously popular. The first club in the United States to build a golf course was the St. Andrew’s Golf Club in Yonkers, New York, which opened in 1888. By 1900 there were more than 1,000 golf courses throughout the country. According to Mayo: Physically well suited for elites, golf was relatively injury-free and most people could play it. The equipment was not overly expensive; also some people wanted the countryside experience but were not enthusiastic about equestrian sports. Thus golf potentially optimized participation of many club members and their families. Golf clubs and country clubs became major components of new American suburbs. According to Mayo: The physical connection between the country club and the elite suburb increased as elites sought to relocate to the suburbs and to join a country club…. In the 1880s the country club phenomenon was so new that real estate developers had not recognized its potential relationship to the elite suburb. All the essential ingredients of commuting lines, suburban settlement, and club organizing were coming together, but elites and developers needed a successful experiment to see the possibilities of combining club and suburb. The first such experiment was the development of Tuxedo Park, New York, planned with a clubhouse. The most influential suburban developer who depended on country clubs as part of his development was J.C. Nichols who, between 1906 and 1950, developed thousands of homes in Kansas City, including the Country Club District. Among his imitators were the developers of the Scioto Country Club (1914) outside Columbus, Ohio, River Oaks (1924) in Houston, Texas, Highland Park in Dallas, and many more. In the early 20th century, of the five boroughs in the City of Greater New York, Queens was the most suburban in character, and had by far the largest number of golf clubs. A local Queens publication in 1924 described the borough as “Queens Borough - the Golfers' Paradise,” and “Queens Borough the Business Man’s Playground.” No section of the country is better equipped to satisfy this craving for outdoor sport than Queens Borough, which has more golf courses than all the other boroughs of New York City combined - there being thirteen courses now in actual operation and two in course of making, the total occupying approximately 2,000 acres. The other four boroughs have a total of only six courses. The same article described the Old Country Club in Flushing as “the oldest course on Long Island.” The Old Country Club The Old Country Club was organized in 1887 – just eight years after the pioneering Myopia Club – as the Flushing Athletic Club, making it one of the earliest such clubs in the United States. Though not originally planned with golf in mind, the club was not immune to the attractions of the sport. In the words of the club’s 1927 Year Book: With the introduction of golf in this country, so many members became interested in the then new game, that golf soon became the principal activity. A Nine-Hole Course was constructed, and in 1902 the name was changed to The Flushing Country Club. The Flushing Country Club was not part of a specific suburban development, but it played a large role in making the surrounding area desirable for suburban homes. Its nine-hole golf course, however, soon came to seem too small. As described by the Flushing Country Club’s 1927 Year Book: Seventeen years passed, and in 1919 a majority of members banded together to form a new club on larger grounds. A handful of faithful golfers refused to leave their old course and promptly reorganized, taking the appropriate name of The Old Country Club, thus distinguishing themselves from the new club. Steps were taken in 1922 to purchase the original Nine-Hole Course and sufficient adjacent property for nine additional holes. The membership was raised to Four Hundred, and The Old Country Club Land Company, Inc., was formed to acquire the desired land. …One year later the Eighteen-Hole Golf Course was ready. The original site on which the Flushing Country Club was built had been acquired from the Mitchell estate, a large tract of land. The land purchased in 1922 by the Old Country Club Land Company, adjoining the original club grounds, was part of the estate of Cornelia Mitchell Wickham. Wickham’s heirs, members of the Mitchell family, owned a large plot, and sold land to other buyers as well. New York City in 1923 had already adopted a zoning code regulating land use, but the Mitchells must have had an eye to the value of their remaining parcels, and included very specific 50-year covenants in their deeds. The sale of the new plot to the Old Country Club Land Company included a detailed description not just of its potential club buildings, but also of potential residential development. The covenant occupied several pages of the deed, and noted that permission was granted for the construction of “churches and buildings for ordinary parochial activities, private schools and private social clubs other than clubs promoting boxing and wrestling matches.” Apparently the Mitchells foresaw the eventual sale and redevelopment of the golf club into yet another suburban development. And indeed, in 1936, just 13 years later, the Old Country Club Land Company sold the plot to Parsons Old Country Club Properties, Inc., for residential development. The Fitzgerald Home Barely six months before the Old Country Club Land Company acquired its new property from the Mitchells, the Mitchells sold a plot 100x200 feet directly adjoining the Club’s property to Charles and Florence Fitzgerald, formerly of Malba Drive. The Mitchells included 50-year restrictive covenants in this deed as well: And the party of the second part covenants, for herself [Florence Fitzgerald], her heirs and assigns that no building shall be erected on the land conveyed other than private dwellings, to cost not less than $8000 each and one private garage for each such dwelling. Not more than two such dwellings shall be erected on the land conveyed. No such dwelling shall be erected nearer than 30 feet from the northerly line of Bayside Avenue and no such garage shall be nearer to Bayside Avenue than the rear line of the dwelling which it serves. Said lands, or any building erected thereon, shall not be used for any manufacturing or business purpose whatever, but the boarding or lodging of other persons in connection with the occupancy of the owner or lessee of the premises for dwelling purposes shall not be deemed a business, which covenant shall run with the land hereby conveyed for a period of 50 years. Despite the covenant’s permission for the construction of two houses, the Fitzgeralds built only one house on the property, which became No. 290 Bayside Avenue (the address later changed to 145-15 Bayside Avenue). They hired architect John Oakman to design a handsome, Tudor-style mansion of the type that had become common in suburban developments. John Oakman, architect John Oakman (1878-1963) earned his B.A. at Williams College (1899) and went on to study architecture in Paris at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts (Architecte Diplome, 1906). He returned to America to enter architectural practice. Available knowledge of Oakman’s career is sketchy. In 1906, on returning to the United States, Oakman joined the office of Carrere & Hastings as a draughtsman. From 1907 to 1911 he was in a partnership with W. Powell Robins, in the firm of Robins & Oakman. In 1907 and 1908, he renovated several buildings on the campus of his alma mater. In 1907, Robins & Oakman received a major commission to design train terminals and a powerhouse for the Hudson & Manhattan Railroad (now PATH). The Christopher Street station is still extant. Judging from his design for the H&M Powerhouse in New Jersey, Oakman had a strong sense both of historical styles and of dramatic massing. In 1914 Oakman returned to France, where he served during World War I. After the war, he opened a practice in Manhattan. He is known to have designed a war memorial in 1925 for Westchester Square, in the Bronx, as well as the Knickerbocker Hospital and Nurses Residence at Amsterdam Avenue at West 131st Street (1920). He described his work in 1949 as: Extensive practice, mostly residential and institutional buildings in N.Y. State and vicinity. Hospital design. Industrial work. He listed examples of his work as: Power House, Hudson & Manhattan Railway Sub-Station, Hudson & Manhattan Railway Protestant Episcopal Orphans’ Home, N.Y.C. Williams College, Currier Hall, Dormitory & Commons Building (Competition) Knickerbocker Hospital, N.Y.C. (Competition) Nurses Home, Knickerbocker Hospital, (N.Y.C.) (Competition) Numerous City and Country Residences. Oakman’s very brief obituary in the New York Times described Oakman as specializing “in designing homes.” Oakman retired in 1940, and moved back to France, but spent the last five years of his life in Alabama. Suburban Housing in the Early Twentieth Century By the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, American suburbs were being filled with huge numbers of single-family homes, built to provide housing for the growing middle-class. Historian Alan Gowans calls this type of building the “Comfortable House.” These houses had evolved from the early picturesque rural cottages promoted by landscape architect Alexander Jackson Downing and his followers into something new, a “combination of country and city home.” They were not strictly country houses because they were situated on small lots rather than large estates, but they were not attached city houses either. With three fully articulated facades, they related to others on the street in terms of size and scale, but were not identical to each other as row houses are. They also broke away from the vertical orientation and boxy internal divisions seen in rowhouses and earlier Italianate and Queen Anne style houses, and were composed to be more horizontal, relating better to the streetscape, and with interior spaces that easily flowed from one to another. The styles that were dominant for suburban houses during this period usually related to an historical style previously developed in America or Europe. These styles provided a sense of security for their residents, a sense of the familiar in a world that was rapidly changing because of an influx of immigrants, increasing industrialization and its resultant change in work patterns, and the country’s new and expanding role in the world at large. Going back to the past for visual metaphors was a way of expressing society’s roots, and they became symbols of shared cultural values. Additionally, since the family was seen as the basis of moral values, its stability was of utmost importance, and its center, the home itself, became the focus of much concern. On a practical level, the “Comfortable House” was appealing because it also included the latest technological developments to make life easier for its inhabitants: indoor plumbing, central heating, electricity and gas lines and laundry facilities. Homes in this period used a variety of historical styles, but refined and rearranged them to meet contemporary design requirements. Popular styles included Beaux-Arts, Colonial Revival, Arts and Crafts, Tudor Revival, and Spanish Revival, among others. Although it would seem that these are very different types, they were linked by common attitudes among their designers, including “a willingness to use applied ornament, generous scale, systematically disciplined adaptation of past styles; and a vague, generalized sort of associationism,” along with a self-consciousness about what they were creating. Through the use of ornament, designers of the period helped maintain a sense of continuity with the past that was reassuring to their clients and to the community as a whole. In domestic architecture, historically-based styles reinforced the status quo by confirming the pretensions of the emerging middle and upper class, with proportionally large and heavily elements, from fireplaces to columns and high ceilings. From Fifth Avenue mansions to revival style suburban houses, filtering down to working class bungalows, these details allowed homeowners to associate themselves with the history and culture of countries that had long and distinguished histories. Suburbs from coast to coast soon filled with houses in a variety of historical revival styles. These buildings were publicized in architectural magazines and available from mail order companies. They were designed by individual architects or ordered from catalogues and constructed in all localities. Whether built on a grand scale or highly simplified, houses with historical references became the norm in American suburban life. The Fitzgerald-Ginsberg house: Suburban Tudor The house that John Oakman designed for Charles and Florence Fitzgerald is a handsome, large and unusually picturesque example of the 1920s Tudor Revival suburban home – a type sometimes referred to as “Stockbroker Tudor.” Tudor is one of the various medieval revival styles much in vogue in the early 20th century. In particular, it represents the residential side of that vogue; in that period, religious and educational buildings – and occasionally commercial as well – preferred a more academic Gothic Revival. Tudor appealed to architects of the day as a picturesque style appropriate to the suburbs, one that could make use of a variety of materials, shapes and textures, as well as a large natural site suitable for plantings. The Tudor also suggested dignified prosperity. Typical elements of a Tudor house include full-length French doors, and numerous windows connecting the inside with the natural world outside. Windows – often grouped together – could be decorative, leaded windows, casements, bays or oriels. Larger buildings were often faced with masonry or decorative brick but could also have stucco contrasting with areas of dark wood framing or stone. The massing was usually irregular and was emphasized by large and prominent gables, chimneys with multiple stacks, or side-swept catslide roofs over entryways. The house designed by John Oakman for the Fitzgeralds fits this description. A large two-story mansion with basement and attic, it sits on a plot 100 feet by 200 feet. Well set back from the property line, the house is approached by a curving drive. Most of the house is faced in large blocks of irregularly shaped fieldstone of varying color, meant to suggest the rustic qualities of the countryside. The house has a pitched roof, with multi-colored slate shingles, and two tall chimneys with multiple chimney pots. Many of the windows – in groups of two, three or four – are of leaded glass with diamond-shaped panes. The overall impression is one of grand, picturesque, prosperous suburban comfort. Just two years after its construction, when the Fitzgeralds sold the property to the Ginsberg family, the New York Times singled out the house for praise in an article about recent real estate transactions: Long Island provided several excellent transactions, especially in the Queens Borough section. At Flushing, where the realty demand has been steadily increasing, one of the finest residences was purchased by Morris Ginsberg from Charles Fitzgerald through the Halleran Agency and Arthur Knapp. The dwelling occupies a plot 200 by 100 feet at 290 Bayside Avenue. It is of stone construction with slate roof and was erected two years ago under the supervision of John Oakman of New York. Later History In 1926, the Fitzgeralds sold the house to Morris and Ethel Ginsberg. Morris Ginsberg was one of three sons of Hyman Ginsberg, proprietor of D. Ginsberg and Sons, a prominent Queens manufacturer of sash, door and trim. As described in an account in 1929: The firm occupies considerable quarters in Corona…. In Corona their building is a landmark. The firm has business throughout Queens, and outside of it, and is conceded as one of the outstanding concerns in its field. D. Ginsberg and Sons are also interested in real estate, notably the mortgage end of it. ….Morris E. Ginsberg is in charge of the business end. The maturity of his business judgment found recognition in the fact that he is one of the youngest vice presidents of a national bank, being Vice President of the Woodside National Bank. Morris E. attended public school and high school in Queens, graduated and entered business immediately after. He is a forward-looking, well-informed, capable young businessman and is held in high regard by the builders who have on many occasions demonstrated the complete confidence they have in him. Morris E. is active in the civic and philanthropic affairs of the community, and is a member of a number of organizations. The Ginsberg family lived in the house for over seventy years, during which few changes were made to the exterior. During that time, however, the surrounding neighborhood changed dramatically. Flushing as a whole became heavily redeveloped with new homes and apartment houses, as well as new commercial buildings. The immediate area around the Fitzgerald mansion is occupied with much smaller houses, on small lots, built after the sale of the Old Country Club. Today, because of its size and proportions, its deep setback on its lot, its entrance drive, its handsome rustic materials, and its carefully designed picturesque massing and details – all remarkably intact – the Fitzgerald/Ginsberg Mansion stands as an unusual survivor from the early 20th century history of Flushing and of Queens. Description The Fitzgerald-Ginsberg house is a substantial, two-story tall (plus basement and attic), Tudor Revival style mansion on a 100’ x 200’ lot, facing onto Bayside Avenue, with an attached garage at the rear. The house is substantially set back from the sidewalk, and approached by a curving gravel drive. Main façade: The main façade, facing Bayside Avenue, is a long, asymmetrically massed, picturesque composition, organized around two major gable-end sections. Each gabled section is two-and-a-half stories tall, with the gable forming the top half-story, and each is faced with irregular fieldstone blocks of varying shape (generally rectangular) and color. The gables have flared eaves. The roof is a graduated slate roof, with larger, thicker slate at the eaves, and narrower, thinner slate at the ridge line. Windows are slightly recessed, with projecting lintels, and enframed by the fieldstone blocks. The gabled section to the east has a tripartite window at the ground floor level, each with small diamond panes, and at the second story level a smaller window with four tall, narrow casements. The gabled section to the west has two irregularly placed windows at the ground floor level, and a window at the second story level. Between the two gabled sections, the pitched roof slopes down to a one-story section with the house’s main entrance; there is a small double dormer window set into the roof, but not directly over the entrance. The entrance is approached by two levels of flagstone; it is outlined by a finished stone surround that is curved at each of the upper corners of the entrance; a small period lantern is attached and centered just above the entranceway; the entrance is shaded by the roof eave which extends slightly over it. There is a historic wooden door, with vertical panels and a small light near the center top, at eye-level, and a non-historic storm door. To the east of the eastern gabled section, there is a two-story section with a steeply sloping roof above; this section is faced not in stone but in stucco. The ground level is taken up almost entirely by a large four-part casement window with a painted wood frame. At the second story level, there is a smaller, four-part casement window, shaded by the roof eave which extends slightly over it. To the west of the western gabled section, the roofline dips below the gable, though not as low as the roofline over the main entrance; there is a four-part casement window with a painted wood frame at the ground floor level, and a basement level below it, partly below-grade – where the ground slopes downward towards the west – with a similar four-part casement window; a retaining wall, constructed of the same unfinished fieldstone as the house, projects perpendicularly from the house just east of this window. At the western edge of the façade, the ground slopes downward fully exposing the basement level of the façade. The house ends here in a two-story porch-like section corresponding to the ground-floor level and the basement level of the rest of the house. On the eastern half of this section, a stone stairway at the basement level leads to a ground-floor level doorway; the roof extends further down over this section, forming a separate pent-roof over the entrance; this roof section is supported by a wooden beam extending down to the second step of the stone staircase. On the western half of this section, the basement portion of the façade is faced in fieldstone, while the ground-level portion is almost entirely taken up by a large multipaned wooden window. East façade: The east façade is comprised of two sections: to the front of the house, a two-story-and-attic gabled section slightly shorter than the main section of the house but projecting out, eastward, from it; and to the rear a small, one-story, separately roofed area. Its ground-level story is faced in fieldstone in its lower portion, with a central doorway with six panels in its lower half and a nine-light window in its upper half, with a four-light transom above; the doorway is flanked on either side by two tall casement windows. The second-story and attic levels are faced in stucco, with a large five-part casement window at the second story. The small, separately roofed area towards the rear of the house is largely occupied by casement windows with diamond-shaped panes. West façade: The western façade has three sections: the projecting porch near the main façade, a stone wall behind it, and an attached garage. Porch: This is the porch-like section at the far western end of the main façade and continues its design, with a fieldstone lower portion and windowed section above, with a roughly stuccoed section of wall at its eastern end, where the porch meets the main portion of the house. The wall area behind it (to its north) is faced in fieldstone, and has a ground-floor level window and a second-floor level two-part casement window. A small square dormer window projects from the roof above. Attached garage: The attached garage has a gable end in rough stucco, a roof similar to the roof of the house, and one large wooden garage door. The driveway is paved in large rough masonry blocks. Rear façade: The rear façade to some extent mirrors the general layout of the front façade, with two major gable-end sections. Most of the façade is of irregular fieldstone, but the upper story of the gable to the west is faced in rough stucco. The easternmost gable end has a double window at the ground-floor level with diamond-shaped panes, and a three-part casement window at the second-floor level; the attic level gable has one small square window. The westernmost gable end has four windows at the ground floor level, and four casement windows with diamond panes at the second floor level. Beyond it is the rear of an attached garage. Between the two gabled sections, the pitched roof slopes down to a one-and-a-half-story section with a second entrance, with casement windows above. The entrance is outlined by a finished stone surround that is curved at each of the upper corners of the entrance. The historic wood door is similar in design to the front door, and has a screen door as well. In the roof above this section, there is one small square dormer window. Above and to the east rises a four-part brick chimney. - From the 1995 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

Flushing High School

Flushing High School
Made by Emilio Guerra
Flushing, Queens Flushing High School, the oldest public secondary school institution m New York and one of the city's architecturally distinguished educational buildings, is located in Flushing, an historically rich area of the Borough of Queens. The brick and terra-cotta building is a striking example of the Collegiate Gothic style which was introduced to public school architecture in New York by C.B.J. Snyder, the Superintendent of Buildings for the Board of Education. Erected between 1912 and 1915 in a campus-like setting, the high school with its monumental square entrance tower recalls English medieval models. It is fitting that the city's oldest public high school institution is housed in one of its most distinguished Collegiate Gothic style buildings. The symbolism implicit in the style, recalling the hallowed seats of learning of medieval England and the political unity of Greater New York, is appropriate for a public school that has educated generations of New Yorkers for over 100 years. Extensions which were added to the east of the original building in 1952-54 and in 1970-74; while these extensions are on the Landmark Site, they are not included in the Landmark designation. The Development of Flushing With the consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, the original county of Queens was divided into two parts: Nassau County and the current Borough of Queens. Flushing, along with Newtown and Jamaica, were the three colonial settlements that now comprise Queens. Flushing was first settled in 1645 by a small group of Englishmen who had first emigrated to the Netherlands before coming to this country. Curing this early period of Flushing's history under the Dutch, it became a center for Quakerism. The religious tolerance of Flushing's early residents was marked by a formal protest against the persecution of the Quakers in December, 1657, known as the Flushing Remonstrance; this document is one of the city's first documents contributing to the establishment of the principle of freedom of worship. During the seventeenth century, Flushing began to develop as one of the most important centers for horticulture in this country. The first impetus to this industry's growth in Flushing is said to have begun with the arrival of French Huguenots who settled in the area after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. These emigrants brought with them fruit trees not native to this country. Later, William Prince was the first to establish a profitable nursery, possibly as early as 1737. Another prominent American horticulturalist associated with Flushing was Samuel Parsons who established his nursery in 1839. The Parsons nursery introduced a number of new plants to this country including the Asiatic rhododendron, the Japanese maple, the Valencia orange, and the weeping beech. The Parsons nursery was also responsible for providing many of the trees for the city's first public parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park. Parsons's grandson, who was also a noted horticultural ist and nurseryman, served as Superintendent of Parks for New York City in 1885 and as Commissioner of Parks in 1905; he was also very active in the Flushing school system. The grounds of Flushing High School contain a number of uncommon trees and plants recalling this important part of the area's history. In fact, within a block radius of the high school are buildings spanning 300 years of Flushing's history: the John Bowne House (1661); the Quaker Meeting House (1694, 1717); the Kingsland Mansion (1775); the Flushing Town Hall (1862); the Flushing Armory (1905); and the R.K.O. Keith's Theater (1927-28) . These buildings, as well as the Weeping Beech Tree, the oldest specimen in the country which dates from 1847, are all designated New York City Landmarks or Interior landmarks with the exception of the Armory. Together with the Flushing High School, they form an exceptional collection of New York's historic, cultural, and architectural resources. The Growth of Public Education in Flushing The present public school system, fully supported and maintained by public funds, developed slowly from the initial establishment under the Dutch of elementary schools supported and jointly controlled by both the civil authorities and the Dutch Reformed Church. Under the English, there was no system of state schools, rather private academies appeared similar to those in Britain. It was not until after the American Revolution that New York State undertook the task of creating a public education system. Curing the period between the first meeting of the state legislature in 1777 and 1851, nearly 1,000 pieces of legislation concerning education were passed. Among the most important acts was the University Act of 1784 which formed the Regents of the University of the State of New York. This was a corporate body authorized by the state to charter, supervise, and control institutions of higher learning. Other important legislation established the principle of state support of schools, and the establishment of general educational standards. Public education in Flushing began in 1848, with the passage of legislation that created the Board of Education of the Village of Flushing. Among the first members of the Board was the nurseryman, Samuel Parsons. The Board opened its first school on November 27, 1848, staffed by seven teachers and attended by 331 students; within two years, the student population had nearly doubled. Flushing also contained a number of private schools such as the Flushing Institute (1827), St. Paul's College (1836), St. Thomas Hall (1838), and others, indicating the concern for and longstanding commitment to education by the residents of Flushing. Flushing High School was incorporated by an act of the state legislature in 1875 and recognized by the Board of Regents in 1877, making Flushing High School the oldest public high school institution in the city. The original high school building stood on Union Street at Sanford Avenue and shared facilities with a grammar school. This building was adequate for the needs of the Town of Flushing which was then a small, contained area characterized by its horticultural nurseries and out-lying truck farms. By 1891, the school-age population in the surrounding areas serviced by the high school had outgrown the facilities of the structure and a new, larger building was erected incorporating the old school. The architect of the new building was Frank A. Collins who later became Deputy Superintendent of Buildings for Queens for the Board of Education. At the beginning of this century, local community and civic leaders in Flushing, aware of the steady growth in the area and the potential for even greater, more rapid growth due to the proposed construction of the Queensborough Bridge and the extension of the subway into Queens, began to lobby for more schools including a new high school. The Board of Education eventually agreed and construction of the present high school building began in 1912. The high school opened for classes in September, 1915, and was officially dedicated on January 14, 1916. The Collegiate Gothic Style in New York The Gothic style enjoyed a revival in popularity in the nineteenth century both in Britain and the United States in part as a reaction to the prevailing Classical and Renaissance-inspired architectural forms. Although the style is primarily associated with religious buildings, throughout the nineteenth century in New York City an aesthetic derived from or inspired by medieval architecture was considered the appropriate mode of expression for academic buildings used for higher education. The most influential college building in the Gothic style in New York was the original New York University by Town, Davis & Dakin (demolished), built between 1832 and 1835 on the east side of Washington Square. The design consciously evoked images of English medieval buildings and academic colleges in Oxford and Cambridge. N.Y.U.'s central entrance tower— embellished with turrets, crenellation, and a soaring pointed-arched solar window — when seen rising above the trees and lawns of Washington Square created a powerful impression of academicism for nineteenth-century New Yorkers. Although a public park, Washington Square served as the campus setting for the building. It was the city's prototypical Collegiate Gothic style building; it established the Gothic as the appropriate and proper style for institutions of higher learning in this city. The Collegiate Gothic style is based on English medieval colleges which were built generally between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries with restoration or rebuilding campaigns during later centuries. These English colleges are not single buildings but many structures serving different functions, erected at different periods, and are often a stylistic amalgam ranging from early Gothic to Tudor. The American Collegiate Gothic style reflects the fact that the medieval English colleges were an amalgam of four centuries of architectural expression by itself being a combination of various elements based on these earlier medieval styles. When the city found it necessary to relocate and expand the City College of New York, the site the trustees of the college chose was on the commanding bluff of Hamilton Heights in Upper Manhattan; the style they chose was the Collegiate Gothic. The North Campus of the City College of New York (1897), designed by George B. Post, contains one of the finest collections of Collegiate Gothic style buildings in the city. It is most probable that the plans for the North Campus prompted C.B.J. Snyder, the Superintendent of Buildings for the Board of Education from 1891 to 1923, to use the Collegiate Gothic style for the designs of the new high schools in the newly consolidated outer boroughs of Greater New York. The stylistic unity of City College in Manhattan, Morris High School (1901-04) in the Bronx, Curtis High School (1902-04) on Staten Island, Erasmus High School (1903-11) in Brooklyn, and Flushing High School (1912-15) in Queens is symbolic of the political unity newly achieved by the Act of Incorporation of Greater New York in 1898.7 The Architect and Flushing Hicrh School8 C.B.J. Snyder (1860-1945) had been appointed to the position of Superintendent of Buildings for the Board of Education in 1891 and remained in that position until his retirement in 1923. Little is known of his background other than that he was bom in Stillwater, New York, and studied architecture with William Bishop. His architectural accomplishments focused on school buildings, and in this area he was a recognized leader. He made major contributions in the areas of school planning, fire protection, ventilation, lighting, and architectural design. A 1905 architectural periodical noted: ... it is a matter of wonderful good fortune that the official architect [of the Board of Education] chanced to be such a man as is Mr. C.B.J. Snyder, who not only at the outset showed such distinct capacity for his task, but has proved himself a man able to grow as his opportunities opened before him. Mr. Wheelwright in Boston, Mr. Ittner in St. Louis, Mr. Mundie in Chicago...have done excellent service to their respective cities in the way of building schoolhouses but they have not had to do their work under the same sort of pressure that has been put on Mr. Snyder, and they have not had to adopt their architectural treatment to as closely restricted sites. One of the main problems Snyder faced in the design of many Manhattan public schools was the accommodation of the requirements of students and teachers to small sites which were necessitated by the high cost of land acquisition. This was not a problem he faced in the designs for the high schools in the outer boroughs. All were situated on sizable pieces of property, on prominent sites, on major thoroughfares, and were conveniently located. The size of the lots on which these high schools stand was large enough to allow for landscaped, campus-like settings as opposed to the confined lots of many of the primary schools. Snyder's work was inventive, solid, and handsome. His earliest designs continued the Romanesque Revival style of the architect who was his predecessor as Superintendent of Schools Buildings, George W. Debevoise. Snyder later moved into Gothic idioms, and was credited with the introduction of the Collegiate Gothic style to New York public school architecture. It was not long after this style began appearing in the architectural press that Snyder began using certain characteristic elements of it in his schools. It took his several attempts before he completely incorporated this new style. In an 1894 school on Edgecombe Avenue between 140th and 141st Streets the few Gothic details gave some suggestion of his future direction. P.S. 27 and P.S. 28, built in 1896 in the Bronx, are square, block-like buildings, but high gables (some pointed, some stepped) rise up at the roofline as on later works. In P.S. 31 (1897-99, a designated New York City Landmark) in the Bronx, Snyder first successfully integrated numerous details in an overall late Gothic composition. This style was more fully explored in such later, more elaborate works as Morris High School on Boston Road, Curtis High School in Staten Island, and Flushing High School. The Site Located at the northeast comer of Northern Boulevard and Union Street, Flushing High School is an impressive structure of brick and terra cotta situated on a large elevated tract of land that rises gently from the southwest to the northeast. The site is slightly irregular due to the oblique intersection of 35th Avenue on the north side and Union Street on the west side of the property. The property was acquired in 1911; the adjoining parcel to the east on which the 1952-54 and 1970-74 extensions stand was acquired in 1945, forming one lot which is the Landmark Site. (While these extensions are on the Landmark Site, they are not included in the Landmark designation.) The original building is U-shaped in plan and set at the rear (northern end) of the site. There is a central entrance block along the property line of 35th Avenue flanked on the west by a classroom wing along the property line of Union Street and on the east by an auditorium wing, forming a three-sided court that opens on the south, facing Northern Boulevard. The building embraces the terraced court which merges with an expanse of tree-shaded, landscaped lawn that slopes down to Northern Boulevard. The court and the lawn with its trees and shrubbery create a campus-like setting which enhances the architectural character of the building. Description The most imposing and dominant feature of the school is the five- story, square entrance tower which follows in the architectural tradition for college buildings established in the city by New York University in 1832. The tower is also a feature that Flushing High School shares with Morris High School, Curtis High School, and City College's Shepard Hall and is emblematic of Snyder's Collegiate Gothic style. The square tower is one of the most evocative elements of the Collegiate Gothic, recalling the medieval colleges of Oxford and Cambridge. To either side of the tower are gabled sections that join the tower to the east and west wings. The west wing is three stories high with gabled ends and a pitched slate roof. The east wing, containing the auditorium, is a double-height single story characterized by broad, pointed-arched, traceried windows. The articulation of this wing is derived from the Perpendicular Gothic chapels associated with medieval English colleges. It is attached to the entrance tower block by a simple two-story hyphen. Flushing High School's picturesque silhouette, asymmetrical massing, and its wealth of Gothic-inspired ornament including oriels, crenellation, drip moldings, grotesque corbels, and heraldic statues enhance its position as one of the city's important Collegiate Gothic structures. The materials of the high school are buff-colored brick, grey speckled terra cotta, and granite used for the water table. 1° The tower is five stories high with full-height comer buttresses of brick enlivened by terracotta quoins. It is set back from the landscaped courtyard by a concrete terrace with a brick parapet. The entrance is a compound, pointed-arch doorway that is flanked by narrow windows with quoins, drip moldings, and sills. Metal-clad doors have replaced the wood originals throughout the exterior of the building. Above the entrance is a two-story, three-sided oriel of terra cotta embellished with a variety of Gothic details. Flanking the oriel at each story are square-headed windows similar to those at the first story. Above the oriel, the fourth and fifth stories have three bays; the wide central bays are filled with triple windows. The tower is crowned by terra-cotta crenellation and diminutive comer finials. The three-story gabled sections that join the tower to the wings of the building are pierced at each level by bays of windows. The window bay module for the school is square-headed, either three or four windows wide, and keyed to the brickwork by terra-cotta quoins. The windows have nine-over-nine, double-hung sash (although there are some variations) which replaces the original mulitpane sash. The 35th Avenue (rear) facade of the tower entrance block is rendered in a straightforward fashion. Cue to the topography of the site, the building is four-stories high, rising from the grade of the street as opposed to the natural grade at the front of the building where it is three stories high. The building is set back from the property line which is demarcated by an iron paling fence which extends around the property. The facade is basically five bays long with a variation at the central bay which contains the rear entrance at street level. Above the pointed-arch entrance is a two-story high, polygonal oriel flanked at each story by double windows. At the fourth story, behind the parapet of the oriel, is a pointed-arch bay crowned by a gable; gables also top the end bays of the facade. Irregularly placed single windows characterize the fourth story except at the central and end bays. Stringcourses at lintel level extend across the facade at the first and third stories. The west wing is three stories high and symmetrically arranged into gabled end bays bracketing three bays of four windows each. The square- headed bays have drip moldings. At the third story, there are paired windows with quoin surrounds. The sloping roof is clad with slate and has copper flashing. There is a pointed-arched entrance to this wing at the base of the northern end bay, surmounted by a terra-cotta oriel. There is another entrance to this wing at the base of the southern facade facing Northern Boulevard. It is a one-story projecting vestibule of brick with buttresses, crenellation, and a pointed-arched doorway. Above, there is a two-story oriel and crowning gable pierced by a tripartite window. The Union Street facade is similar to that facing the court. It is five bays long with gabled end bays and four stories high due to the change in grade. The northern end bay has a pointed-arched entrance surmounted by an oriel. At some point prior to 1982, work was done on the interior structural lintels of a number of bays on this facade and on the 35th Avenue facade of the entrance tower block. The original buff brick has been replaced with light yellow brick in about five courses above the bays. The east wing is the most romantic feature of the school, recalling the medieval chapels associated with the colleges at Oxford and Cambridge. It is six bays long and three bays wide; the full-height bays have tall, wide, pointed-arched windows with tracery, separated by buttresses. The southern facade of this wing, facing Northern Boulevard, is three-sided, designed to read as the apse of a chapel. The main entrance is in the central bay of this facade and is similar to the projecting entrance of the west wing. The roof line is enlivened by crenellation and by polygonal colonnettes above each buttress that carry such fanciful heraldic statues as unicoms, griffins, and wivems reminiscent of Hampton Court, England. The high pitched roof is slate with copper flashing. Subsequent History Development and population growth in the Flushing area necessitated the expansion of the school to alleviate overcrowding. In 1954 a new wing was completed, which was dedicated as a World War II memorial. In 1974, the adjoining gymnasium wing was completed. - From the 1991 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Bowne House

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Bowne House
Made by wallyg
The Bowne House, built in 1661 and completed by 1695, was home to John Bowne, who was arrested in 1662 for permitting the Quakers to hold meetings in the house at a time when only the religious practices of the Dutch Reformed Church were permitted in New Amsterdam. After appealing to the Dutch government in Holland, Bowne was acquitted, thus establishing the right to freedom of worship. Beyond standing as a monument to religious freedom and the best preserved example of Colonial Anglo-Dutch vernacular residential architecture in the country, the kitchen wing of the Bowne House is the oldest surviving structure in Queens and one of the oldest in New York City. The Bowne House Historical Society was founded in 1946 by a group of local Flushing residents for the sole purpose of purchasing the house and opening it to the public as a museum. The Society puchased the house from the last family occupants, the Parsons sisters, and has operated it as a museum since 1947. The Museum's exceptional collections illustrate the social history of the Bowne and Parsons families from the 17th through the 20th centuries. Most of the approximately 5,000 objects in our possession are original to the house and belonged to the family. Included are fine examples of English and American furniture, decorative arts, textiles, costumes, household artifacts, rae books and manuscripts, paintings and toys. Correspondence in the collection demonstrates the influence of political, social and economic events of the day on the house's residents, including their civic activities. The collections are a renowned resource for scholars of American history and decorative arts. The Bowne House was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmrks Preservation Commission in 1966. National Register #77000974 (1977)

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Queens Library

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Queens Library
Made by wallyg
The Queens Borough Public Library, located on a trainagular site the intersection of Kissena Boulevard and Main Street, is the largest branch library in New York City. The current building, designed by Polshek Partnership Architects, is the third to be built on the site--the first was a gift of Andrew Carnegie. Metaphorically, the transparent façade, which faces a commercial thoroughfare, advertises learning: the glass membrane allows the facility's collections and functional organization to be visually accessible from the street. The opposite façade is rendered with stone, its articulation alluding to the book stacks within and its opacity allowing perimeter shelving to be maximized. Other program spaces include: a 227-seat auditorium, a multi-purpose room for 150, conference rooms, exhibition areas, an Adult Learning Center and an International Resource Center. The Queens Borough Public Library, or Queens Library, as it refers to itself today, is the public library for the Borough of Queens and one of three library systems serving New York City, comprising some 63 branches throughout the borough. Since 1994, it has had high annual circulation, and it is the second largest library in the country in terms of the size of its collection. The first library in Queens was founded here, in Flushing, in 1858 as a subscription service. It became a free circulation library in 1869. In 1901, shortly after the consolidation of Queens into New York City, the city government proposed a new charter joining all libraries in Queens into the Queens Borough Public Library. All of the public libraries signed on, except for Flushing, which remained independent until 1903.

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Flushing Town Hall

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Flushing Town Hall
Made by wallyg
Before the consolidation of Greater New York in 1868, each town had its own governmental center. This 1862 Early Romanesque Revival masonry building is one of the few such town halls still standing. Originally it served as a staging area for local soldiers leaving for the Civil War. For years it was the center of cultural and political life in the village of Flushing, hosting abolitionist Frederick Douglass in 1865. After incorporation it became a municipal courthouse. The German inspired design is striking it its use of round-arched forms for windows and doors, its entrance portico and its corbeled cornice. By the 1980's, it fell into disrepair and ownership was assumed by the City. An $8M renovation in the late 90's by Platt Byard Dovell transformed it from a neighborhood eyesore to the magnificent structure of today. The Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts (FCCA), founded in 1979, assumed management of the the building in 1991 from the City, which still owns it. Flushing Town Hall's facilities include a 340-seat state of the art concert hall/theater, three museum quality galleries, a classroom, offices, a garden that accommodates 250 people for outdoor events, and a visitors' center. FCCA is a member of New York City's Cultural Institutions Group (CIG); and an Affiliate Member of the Smithsonian Institution, the world's largest museum and research institute. Flushing Town Hall was designated a landmark, as Flushing Municipal Courthouse, by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1968. National Register #72000904 (1972)

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Kingsland Homestead

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Kingsland Homestead
Made by wallyg
Built by Flushing native Charles Doughty around 1785, the Kingsland Homestead acquired its name from his son-in-law, British sea captain Joseph King, who bought the home in 1801. The last of Doughty’s descendants to reside in the house were the Murrays, for whom Murray Hill is named, who lived in it until 1937. A subway extension threatened to destroy the house in 1923, and it was moved from its foundations on 155th Street and Northern Boulevard. Endangered again by new construction, the house was transferred to its present site, on the edge of in 1968 by the Kingsland Preservation Committee. The Queens Historical Society, which was formed in that year, has had its headquarters in the house ever since. The gambrel-roofed vernacular frame shingle house, which combines English and Dutch architectural styles, is a prime example of the Long Island Half House that was common during the post-Colonial period. It has been open to the public since 1973, providing visitors a glimpse of Victorian life through a furnished parlor room in addition to special exhibits staged by the Queens Historical Society. One of 19 historic houses under the jurisdiction of Parks and the Historic House Trust of New York City, the house is the second oldest in Queens and was completely rehabilitated and conserved between 1988 and 1996. The Kingsland Homstead was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1965. National Register #72000905 (1972)

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Old Quaker Meeting House

NYC - Queens - Flushing: Old Quaker Meeting House
Made by wallyg
The easter third of the Friends Meeting House, also known as the Old Quaker Meetinghouse, is New York's oldest structure in continous use for religious purposes. It has been used by the Flushing Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends as a house of worship for over 300 years. Built in 1694 by , it is second oldest Quaker meetinghouse in the country. visitors to the house included George Washington, John Woolman and William Penn. The simple wooden structure's proportions and framing offer evidence of the survival of medieval building techniques during colonial times. It is characterized by a wood shingle roof, Yankee gutters and wood cornice. A graveyard planted with indigenous trees and flowers is part of the Meeting House's grounds. Although it is no longer used for interments, the burial ground is the final resting place for individuals and families who were prominent in Long Island history, including John Bowne and his family, the Leggett, Hicks and Wright families. The Friends Meeting House was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1970. National Register #67000015 (1967)

Dha Dhin Dhin Na...

Dha Dhin Dhin Na...
Made by Sharad2020
Dedicated to all the Tabla players out there! Some of my favs: Ustad Zakir Hussain, Ustad Allah Rakha, Pt. Arbindo Chaterjee, Sachin Pimple (Jaideep Swadia's group), Balvant Sindha (Gandhinagar, Gujarat), whole BAPS NY Tabla crew: Aksher Patel, Priyal Bhagat, Kirtan Bhatt, Priyal Patel, Rahul Zala. I'm pretty sure I'm forgetting a few more people. There are a lot of other inspirational tabla players out there, but the one who stands out the most is of course, my boy Ustad Zakir Hussain. Had the privilege of attending couple of his concerts. One was Remember Shakti in 2009, Masters of Percussion in 2010 and Zakir Hussain with NIladri Kumar in 2010. He is always so energetic, creative, incredibly intelligent in whatever he plays. Truly an inspirational person! Would love to meet him in person. Thanks! P.S: Taken during the rehearsals for Guru Hari Jayanti in BAPS Swaminarayan Mandir, Flushing, NY. Kirtan Bhatt is playing the tabla. One of my fav tabla player! Way to go KB :)

Lovely lovely kedgeree

Lovely lovely kedgeree
Made by Hamburger Helper
I really wanted to make this dish for Christmas Eve because it's easy and I wanted to do something with fish. This uses kippered salmon, which is the closest thing I could get to smoked haddock. Onion Rice (preferably basmati, but I only had sushi rice and cooked properly, it works fine) Garam masala, pre mixed curry powder, or some blend of your own Smoked haddock or salmon Parsley Eggs Fried onions (I didn't have the stamina to fry my own so I cheated and used French's, but the real thing is so much better, albeit optional) Butter Cook the rice. Boil the eggs so the whites are hard but there's some moisture in the yolks. Finely chop an onion and fry in butter. Add your spices along with some salt and pepper and cook over a low flame to let the spices bloom but not burn. Shut off heat. Add the cooked rice and smoked fish and toss thoroughly. Garnish with your perfectly cooked eggs cut in quarters, chopped parsley, and fried onions.

Christmas Meatloaf

Christmas Meatloaf
Made by Hamburger Helper
Meatloaf may seem too humble a dish to make for a special occasion such as Christmas but it isn't something we eat often and anyway, my mother requested it. This was a small loaf made with lean hormone-free beef. 1 lb ground beef 1 onion Few cremini Ketchup Worcestershire 3 cloves garlic Parsley Olive oil Thyme Salt and pepper Slosh of beer because I happened to have an open bottle Newcastle 2 slices white bread Milk Soak bread in milk and let it absorb. Mash into a paste. Heat some olive oil in a pan and sautee chopped onion and mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper. When the vegetables have softened and the onions have a little color, add to the beef. Combine with few squirts of ketchup, sloshes of Worcestershire, beer, thyme, chopped parsley, finely minced garlic, bread mash, salt and pepper. Mix well and shape into a loaf. Coat with ketchup and bake in a 350F oven for about 45 minutes.

2010 - 01 - 10 - fishnets

2010 - 01 - 10 - fishnets
Made by Mississippi Snopes (swamped by work)
On our last annual trip to New York, our friend Carol told me not to be too selective in weeding out shots from the trip. No one's ever told me that before. An amateur photographer's dream. Update: Alex Chilton was all over this (from his cover of Tee Ni Nee Na Noo): Come on baby, work your show. Do the boogaloo! You've got the flow. Everybody's watching you. You're looking good, baby. Ain't that the truth? Now, when you're through, won't you come be my tee ni nee na noo? ... Ah, lay it on me, baby. Don't stop now. Let your hair down baby. We ain't going to heaven, nohow. I'm ready to burn baby, right here and now. Oh, I dig those crazy clothes. Let me feel those fishnet hose. Cut low at the top and high at the bottom. In fact, I don't see how we ever did without 'em.... Ooooeeeee ... now sock it to me. I hope he's still just as horny, but in a better place with no hangovers.

Black Sesame Bun

Black Sesame Bun
Made by Hamburger Helper
I got this from a pokey little Chinese bakery a few doors from Sam Won Gahk. It's called Blvd Bakery but I keep reading it as Blood Bakery because of the puffy letters on their sign. But as I needed coffee badly and my only other option was McDonald's across the street, I gave it a try. Their coffee is exceptionally strong, considering the neighborhood is full of people who seem to prefer very sweet weak coffee further diluted with Coffeemate. Maybe it's because this bakery serves the Mexican day workers waiting outside and they like their coffee strong. Anyway, this place isn't big like Fay Da with a lot of choices (or cheap - buns that are usually between 60-80 cents are $1 here) but I did manage to find this tasty little thing. It's a freshly baked bun with sweetened black sesame paste inside.

Red Orange Orange, 7 Train to Flushing (Polaroid)

Red Orange Orange, 7 Train to Flushing (Polaroid)
Made by ravikjolly
Camera: Polaroid Spectra Film: Polaroid 1200 (Expired 2009) Sunday morning, pale winter sun, empty 7 train to Flushing. Notice the irregular yellowish panel in the center. I bought this expired film as part of The Impossible Project's European warehouse sale. They warned about such irregularities: Polaroid Image Giambarba Expired Triple Pack Fat triple pack of the lovely large format Polaroid Integral Image Film. Also known as SPECTRA or 1200 film. Famous cinemascopic format fantastic colors and nice price are the outstanding features of this material. Limited Edition designed by Paul Giambarba. As this film is the final sale of expired original Polaroid material, it can show some irregularities, such as purple or yellow lines across the picture. Yeah, no kidding.

How does music sound in Heaven? ♬

How does music sound in Heaven? ♬
Made by Sharad2020
Been wanted to upload this, and finally did! The reason I converted it to black and white is because, I learned in my History of Photography class today, that all the legendary photographers thought that only Black & White photographs were actually considered as art. Whereas, color photographs weren't. So felt like I should convert it ;) I'm a big fan of Indian Classical Music, and I'm proud of it. When I tell people that I listen to tabla, sitar, santoor etc. instruements, they give me a look. They are too carried away by their hip-hop and rap music. Oh well! I listen to what I believe in. P.s: My friend Yogesh asked me to upload a SOOC on my birthday, but I have this. Hope you like it ;) Also, this is not an arranged shot. Just snapped it as soon as I saw it :)

Sam Won Gahk Lunch Special

Sam Won Gahk Lunch Special
Made by Hamburger Helper
The accoutrements. It came with hot and sour soup that had pieces of pork belly, and a lot of black pepper that really opened my pores up and got me sweating. And it wasn't gloppy with too much corn starch. There were also some very good kimchee, dakwang (pickled daikon radish dyed yellow), fermented black bean paste, and slices of raw onion. You're supposed to dip the onion in the bean paste but as I don't like doing that I saved the onions for a fritatta or something and will use the paste for something else.

Picture Crisis :O

Picture Crisis :O
Made by Sharad2020
I hate to tell you guys this, but right now, I don't have any pictures to upload on flickr. I went through my archives, and didn't really find anything that is worth uploading here. And, with my new job, I don't really get time to take pictures. And on top of that, my point and shoot camera (Canon sx110) is acting retarded. So, I'm planning to buy Canon s95. So hopefully I get that and upload some new pictures. Other than that, I'm taking a break from flickr :(

Your Next Move…

Your Next Move…
Made by Ryan Brenizer
An outtake from an annual report shoot on international education. There now exist two annual reports and two magazines that I have shot *every last assignment* for. Covers, back-of-book portraits, photojournalistic features, you name it. ----------------------- www.amazon.com/ryanbrenizer/, or follow all of my updates via RSS.

los ojos

los ojos
Made by fahid chowdhury
FINALLY, finals are over!!! This past week has felt like one long never ending moment for me. I have had little to no sleep and have only gotten showers and meals in between checkouts. I have spent 15-16 hours in the studio for the past two weeks. I’m hoping that once grades are posted, I will finally be able to chill. I hope everyone is ready for wonderful holiday time with your family and friends!



Made by madmaxnyc
Adam, Eve, please take a moment to meet.... Oh my God! Juxtaposition is not just an annoying SAT or GRE word, it can also be inadvertently funny, thanks to well paired ads for Hyatt Hotels, and against Hepatitis (that one may or may not have contracted at the Hyatt). Taken either at the Garden of Eden or in Flushing/Main street, on photo without the smell, it's hard to tell them apart.

Day 331 - X Marks the Spot

Day 331 - X Marks the Spot
Made by excalipoor
I felt some chest pain on the left side, so I went to see the doctor immediately after work. The result was normal. But since he already diagnosed me with nerve damage, so there's a chance that it's muscle pain that extend to my left chest. So I went to get x-ray on my spine. Hope it is just muscle strain and not heart problems when the results come out in a few days. Day 331. 090401



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