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Field of Corn



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Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)
Made by jfsl3
Malcolm Cochran, 1994 From plaques on the site: Hybridization revolutionized the production of corn in North America and worldwide in the 20th century. Cross-polinating two distinct varieties of corn or other plants can result in hybrids that are stronger and more resistant to drought and disease, and can produce higher yields than either parent variety. Native Americans and early settlers had experimented with many ways to improve corn, but the first commercial hybrid corn was not produced until 1918. The breakthrough came when American agricultural researchers crossed the offspring of two hybrid strains to create a double-cross hybrid. They learned to control pollination by placing paper bags on corn ears and tassels, removing them only to pollinate the plants by hand. Like most corn grown in the 1990s, the variety depicted here is a double-cross hybrid called Corn Belt dent corn, which has between 14 and 22 rows of yellow kernels and a small dimple, or dent, on the end of the kernels. The basic parents of dent corn are Northern flint corn and Southern gourdseed corn. Sam Frantz, who farmed this site from 1935 to 1963, was well known for his development of hybrid corn seeds. He worked with the Ohio State University on corn hybridization projects and served on the United States Department of Agriculture Seed Advisory Committee.

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)
Made by jfsl3
Malcolm Cochran, 1994 From plaques on the site: Farming was central to the economy of this region from the time of the first European settlers in the late 1700s. Early settlers cleared land on which to live and farm, and corn was their most important crop. They grew corn in much the same way Native Americans had for centuries. Most corn was consumed by the farm families and their livestock, but some surplus corn was sold to distilleries, which were established throughout Ohio by the early 1800s. As the population grew, so did the amount of corn raised, and by 1850, Ohio led the country in corn production. Franklin County was among the top corn producing regions in the state for many decades, and the family farms that surrounded the mercantile village of Dublin contributed to this productivity. As recently as 1965, Frantz, Rings, Sawmill, Case, Brand, Tuttle, Avery, and Post roads were all flanked by cornfields. In the 1990s, Ohio still ranks as one of the nation's largest producers of corn.

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)
Made by jfsl3
From plaques on the site: Construction and development have transformed Dublin and its environs over the past three decades. Into the 1960s, much of the land round Dublin was agricultural. Sam and Bulalia Frantz moved to this site in 1935 and lived here until 1963. Sam farmed the land, and Bulalia was always working with him. Both were from families that had been early settlers in the area. The Frantz family came to Dublin in 1828, and Bulalia (Billingsley) was from a long line of farmers in Washington Township. The Frantz farm was sold in 1968. Only a few years later, in the mid-1970s, three major projects marked the turning point in the history of land use in Dublin. The completion of the northwest link in the I-270 outerbelt and the development of Muirfield Village and the Ashland Chemical Research Center set the stage for Dublin's metamorphosis from a farm village to a suburban, residential community and corporate office center.

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)
Made by jfsl3
Malcolm Cochran, 1994. From plaques on the site: Corn has been cultivated in Ohio for approximately 1800 years. It was known to prehistoric Native American Hopewell peoples (A.D. 100-500). Prehistoric and historic Native Americans combined plantings of corn, beans, squash, and gourds in their fields and small garden plots. Two important varieties of corn were Northern flint corn, which had 16 to 20 rows of kernels on long, thin cobs, and Southern gourdseed corn, which had short, stubby ears with up to 32 rows of kernels. By the mid-1700s, Native Americans in Ohio grew great quantities of corn, often in larger fields. Particularily along the Scioto and Miami River valleys, it was not uncommon to see thousands of acres of cornfields. The Wyandot Indians, who are known to have camped on scenic Indian Run just north of Dublin village, were prominent among the historic Native American cultivators of corn.

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)

Field of Corn (with Osage Orange)
Made by jfsl3
From plaques on the site: The Osage orange trees on this site are remnants of a tree row typical of those which once extended for miles along the edge of farm fields in Dublin. The Osage orange, or Machura pomifora, is a member of the Mulberry family, and it is native to midwestern North America. Its common name refers to the Osage Indians of Arkansas and Missouri who used the dense orange wood to make bows and tomahawks. Early farmers often planted the Osage orange as fencing along fields and property lines because its irregular, thorny branches quickly grew to form a secure boundary. These hedge rows also provided refuge for birds and small animals. The fruit of the Osage orange is the size of a softball and chartreuse green in color with a bumpy surface texture like brain. It is widely known as a natural repellant for roaches, spiders, and other insects.

Corn statuary

Corn statuary
Made by Jon R. Roma
Weird corn statuary near Columbus, OH. This odd artistic statement caught my eye – I'm not sure whether there's a statement lurking in this statuary or not. But the lack of melted butter and salt is somewhat disappointing. Interestingly, one can see the corn statuary in an aerial photograph of this location – see the location data attached to this image.

Field of Corn

Field of Corn
Made by Laughing Squid
See the blog post for more info: Field of Corn in Dublin, Ohio This photo is licensed under a Creative Commons license. If you use this photo, please list the photo credit as Scott Beale / Laughing Squid and link the credit to laughingsquid.com.

"Field of Corn (with Osage Orange Trees)" Dublin Ohio 5

"Field of Corn (with Osage Orange Trees)" Dublin Ohio 5
Made by b+USD
Subject: Franz Road Cornfield in Dublin, Ohio. This is in Dublin Ohio. If you would like to learn more about the cornfield check out the Dublin Arts county description at: www.dublinarts.org/popups/corn.html

Statues of Corn, Dublin Ohio

Statues of Corn, Dublin Ohio
Made by das_miller
I still don't . . I mean . . a field of statues of giant CORN? Is this a corn graveyard, or a tribute to a particularly heroic corn battalion, or . . .? They're about 7 feet tall, neatly arranged in rows.

Goose poop and frozen corn (100_0311)

Goose poop and frozen corn (100_0311)
Made by curbebob
I could not find parking at this park. Or the sign stating that it was. It was clearly listed on my Columbus map as one though.

Field of Corn

Field of Corn
Made by MatthwJ
Sam and Eulalia Frantz Park in Dublin, Ohio For FGR2.0 - Today's group is . Each of these ears of corn is about 8 feet tall.

The Concrete Corn 08

The Concrete Corn 08
Made by Noral O Koehn
Looking back from the parking lot, notice the size of each ear next to this car Digital Photography class shoot 02 photo 21

corn sculpture

corn sculpture
Made by tommrkr
laughingsquid.com/field-of-corn-in-dublin-ohio/

For YerTikiMom

For YerTikiMom
Made by Chip and Andy
The ladies mooning the building where YerTikiMom works..... (Ken, look upon the field and smile)

Corncobs

Corncobs
Made by tommrkr
Go north on Frantz road, 1 block past Tuttle Crossing, and you will see something very weird.

Corn

Corn
Made by tommrkr
I was messing around, trying to get the sunlight to make the corn look as yellow as possible.

Corn Statues in the Snow

Corn Statues in the Snow
Made by das_miller
Statues of . . . corn? I'll try to get a better picture of it next time I'm in the area.

The Concrete Corn 03

The Concrete Corn 03
Made by Noral O Koehn
the old and the new each ear is 6 foot tall Digital Photography class shoot 02 photo 26

The Concrete Corn 07

The Concrete Corn 07
Made by Noral O Koehn
A field of concrete corn is a funny sight Digital Photography class shoot 02 photo 22

The Concrete Corn of Dublin Ohio 02

The Concrete Corn of Dublin Ohio 02
Made by Noral O Koehn
Ohio's favorite cornfiels in a row Digital Photography class shoot 02 photo 27



Nearest places of interest:

CC Technologies
Washington Township Fire Station 95
North Bridge Plaza
Hayden Falls
  John Sells Middle School
Dublin Branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library
Metro Place North, 555
US Route 33 West/ Interstate 270 Exit 17

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