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Exeter Airport (UK)

the Exeter Airport (UK) is part of Clyst Honiton, United Kingdom.

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Supermarine Spitfire TA805

Supermarine Spitfire TA805
Made by vaughaag
1944 Built at the Supermarine works at Castle Bromwich in the West Midlands late in the war, TA805 started its career with the RAF at No 39 MU in December 1944. Wearing the code letters HF it joined 183 (Gold Coast) Squadron at Chilbolton on the 17th June 1945. Commanded by Sqd/Ldr J R Cullen DFC, the squadron converted from the Typhoon IB to the Spitfire IX. The squadron Operational Record Book records the conversion and movements. 1945 The pilots and their kit were flown by Dakota to Chilbolton where we join Fighter Command No.11 Group and convert to Spitfire IX's. 20.6.45 - Four new aircraft ferried in by ATA. A period of conversion then began for two months. On the 1st August the squadron commenced formation flying, aerobatics and cannon testing. On the 27th July 1945 TA805 was transferred to No.234 (Madras Presidency) Squadron at Bentwaters in Suffolk. Now coded FX,the squadron had just converted from Mustang IV's to Spitfire IX's at Bentwaters and were due to go to a Practice Armament Camp. The squadron Operational Record Books records the following. 1949 The squadron then returned to Bentwaters. 234 Squadron were part of a wing of 24 Squadrons led by legendary Battle of Britain ace and later famous test pilot W/Cdr Roland P Beamont DSO and Bar DFC. This wing flew the 1945 Battle of Britain commemoration flight over London in September and it is possible that TA805 was one of the aircraft taking part. TA805 was then struck off charge and shipped to the South African Air Force in early 1949. The Spitfire IX opposite - 5553 wears the colours of the South African Air Force. Not much is known about this period of service but the aircraft was scrapped in 1954. It was not until 1981 that the remains of TA805 were discovered and eventually returned to the UK. In 1995 Airframe Assemblies on the Isle of Wight started the re-build before it was passed to the Aircraft Restoration Company at Duxford who completed the re-build and TA805 took to the skies once again in December 2005. The aircraft was purchased by Peter Monk and Mike Simpson, both Kentish Men, in 2006 and moved to Biggin Hill where it is still based. They wanted it to fly in memory of 131 (County of Kent) Fighter Squadron, a wartime squadron that was purchased by donations given by the good people of Kent in 1941. In addition the CO’s aircraft was emblazoned with the caption ‘Spirit of Kent’, the same as the present aircraft. Today the aircraft can be seen flying all over Kent at various functions and shows. Its first public showing was at the Biggin Hill Air Fair where, piloted by John Romain, it won the Breitling Trophy for the best aerobatic and solo performance. Three days at the County Show bought it a host of new admirers where it was the main attraction. Various open days are held at Manston for the public of Kent to see their aircraft. Remember, if you hear a Merlin engine in the skies above Kent, it may well be your own Spitfire, the ‘Spirit of Kent’. Credit @ Robin J Brooks. www.kentspitfire.co.uk/history/

Bristol Freighter

Bristol Freighter
Made by Jerry.B9
Circa 1988/89 and taken with my Nikon F301 SLR - scanned 2010. Introduced in 1946, the Bristol Type 170 Freighter was designed originally as a rugged, heavy-duty transport to operate from unimproved airstrips. As it appears, it's 'good', solid, 1940s British engineering, not pretty, but a classic aircraft that served its purpose well, and operated in many countries throughout the World. Bristol freighter Mk 31M G-BISU, seen here,(c/n 13218) was operated by Instone Airlines at Stansted, Essex, UK, for a number of years. This was an ex-RNZAF aircraft and left Ardmore (Auckland) on 2 March 1981 for its 86-hour ferry flight to the UK. It subsequently flew its first charter flight on 3 August 1981 delivering two racehorses to Deauville. This role of flying livestock was to take up half a year while other work included carriage of oil drilling machinery, car parts, newspapers and mail. See here on the northside at Exeter Airport, on a dull overcast day day, this aircraft very occasionally flew some Royal Mail night flights out of Exeter. Usually it was leased in by a regular operator whose aircraft may have been delayed elsewhere; grounded due to a technical problem; or as an extra aircraft during the build up to Christmas. One night / early morning whilst working in A.T.C. - night shift usually ended at 2.30/3.00am when the last mail flight landed, we were waiting for this aircraft to come in. From memory it was called in to bring an inbound mail load, as the regular aircraft had developed at fault and could not fly back to Exeter. The Royal Mail called Instone and 'scrambled' their Freighter. We knew that it was going to be a longer than normal night. as speed was not an asset that the Freighter possessed - maybe around 180-200mph in the cruise tops. Eventually, at around 4.00am it was on RADAR and inbound. These aircraft were also not noted for being quiet due to their two 1,980hp Bristol Hercules 14-cylinder sleeve-valve radial engines. We could practically hear it coming, the pre-dawn quiet being shattered by a 'wall of sound' - slow, but LOUD!!! Even on the ground, the engines 'barked' and 'crackled' echoing all around the neighbourhood. Unfortunately, the aircraft had to depart, so at around 5.00am, the airport environs were subjected to this mighty beast firing up, and then full power for take off. Beats any Dawn chorus, but not good for the neighbours. Night-shift ended at around 5.30am more or less when the morning shift started. Apparently, this aircraft went to Canada, but was written off in 1996 during a take-off accident. Some survive in various places as museum pieces. As the saying goes, They don't build 'em like that anymore.

Netjets Gulfstream G550 CS-DKC

Netjets Gulfstream G550 CS-DKC
Made by vaughaag
Netjets Gulfstream G550 CS-DKC, seen here wearing Netjets brand new livery. Parked on stand 8 at Exeter International Airport, August 28th 2010. This shot was taken at 0515 this morning (28th August 2010) just as the fog was rolling in over the field. Sony A200, Minolta 28mm @ f8 4 ISO400 This is a re-edit for a sale print. NetJets Inc. formerly Executive Jet Aviation, was founded in 1964 as one of the first private business jet charter and aircraft management companies. The founding members of the board of directors of Executive Jet Aviation Corporation (EJA), included Air Force generals Curtis E. LeMay, and Paul Tibbetts, Washington lawyer and former military pilot Bruce Sundlun, and entertainers James Stewart and Arthur Godfrey among others, with retired Air Force Brigadier General Olbert F. (Dick) Lassiter as president and chairman of the board.[1][2] EJA initially began operations in 1964 with a fleet of ten Learjet 23 aircraft.[3] Bruce Sundlun became EJA president in 1970, and Paul Tibbetts became president in 1976. [4] By the late 1970s, EJA was doing business with approximately 250 contract flying customers and logging more than three million miles per year. Executive Jet Aviation Corporation was purchased in 1984 by former Goldman Sachs executive Richard Santulli and he became chairman and CEO of the corporation. In 1986 the NetJets program was created by Santulli as the first fractional aircraft ownership program. In 1998, after being a NetJets customer for three years, Warren Buffett, Chairman & CEO of the Berkshire Hathaway company, acquired NetJets Inc.[3] In early August of 2009 Santulli resigned as CEO and was replaced by David Sokol. [5] NetJets Inc. has moved its corporate headquarters from New Jersey back to its original home in Columbus, Ohio, following the departure of the company's founder, Richard Santulli.

Flairjet E50P G-RAAL

Flairjet E50P G-RAAL
Made by vaughaag
Flairjet E50P G-RAAL taxiing to the South Apron at Exeter International Airport, 4th December 2010. Flairjet was created to provide first class, on time, performance excellence, with a fleet of brand new, cutting edge technology aircraft, so that you can arrive at your destination in style and comfort. When we say a brand new fleet, we mean it. No twenty year old aircraft with re-fits here! Our new 2009 Embraer Phenom 100’s are the first to bear the UK “G” register mark making us the leading Embraer Phenom 100 operator in the country. With further Embraer Phenom 100’s and 300’s planned for 2010 the choice of Flairjet becomes clear. Flairjet was conceived and built upon the principle of premiere but affordable service to our customers. A combination of the 1930’s, golden era, of diamond class quality flying and the modern requisites of efficiency, reliability, technology and safety. From top to bottom our focused team of dedicated professionals is committed to delivering excellence, whether it be from the man or woman who polishes our aircraft to the man or woman who flies it. As you will see in our “Meet the Team” section you will struggle to find a private jet company with a more experienced team of pilots, managers and staff. This not only assures great customer service, so important in what we do, but the knowledge that safety and quality are more important to us than they are to you. Whether you are a seasoned private jet user or hesitating towards your first experience, whether you are a family looking for a special break or a regular corporate bizjet flier, whether you are booking for yourself or are a broker booking a customer you will find the Flairjet service to be dedicated, affordable and of the highest standard.

Team Viper, Hawker Hunter(s)

Team Viper, Hawker Hunter(s)
Made by vaughaag
Team Vipers Hawker Hunter(s) at Exeter International Airport. Seen here carrying out a high speed run and break into the left hand circuit at Exeter International Airport. G-VETA, (black and gold stripe) Built in 1958 and served with many RAF squadrons. Now privately owned—VETA stands for Very Expensive Toy Airplane. G-ETPS (XE601), (red white and blue), Originally a MK6 and first flew May 1956, converted to a Mk9 in 1965 and operated by the Fast Jet Squadron at Boscombe Down until 1999. G-BWGL (XF357 now N-321), (silver and orange), Built as F4 but converted to a T8 in 1958/9. It then spent the remainder of its service life with the Royal Navy. The aircraft is now in the Dutch Royal Air Force markings and is based in the Netherlands. The Team was out playing whilst being filmed by the BBC. Team Viper ™ is the only Strikemaster & Hunter Team in the World. Flying a combination of Supersonic Hawker Hunter jets and BAC 176 Strikemasters the jets convey an aura of classical elegance, which we affectionately describe as Power, Heritage and Soul. As the only such team in the World, we aim to show these unique and incredible fighter jets and classic jet aviation, in a way that is both elegantly extreme and totally unique. The team is named after the Rolls Royce Viper engine found in the Strikemaster and both aircraft have a very rich heritage around the World, as a significant export success for Britain and were flown by many air forces globally as front line fighters. The team is completely unique being both privately owned and flown by military pilots from the British Royal Air Force.

Netjets Gulfstream G550 CS-DKC

Netjets Gulfstream G550 CS-DKC
Made by vaughaag
Netjets Gulfstream G550 CS-DKC, seen here wearing Netjets brand new livery. NetJets Inc. formerly Executive Jet Aviation, was founded in 1964 as one of the first private business jet charter and aircraft management companies. The founding members of the board of directors of Executive Jet Aviation Corporation (EJA), included Air Force generals Curtis E. LeMay, and Paul Tibbetts, Washington lawyer and former military pilot Bruce Sundlun, and entertainers James Stewart and Arthur Godfrey among others, with retired Air Force Brigadier General Olbert F. (Dick) Lassiter as president and chairman of the board.[1][2] EJA initially began operations in 1964 with a fleet of ten Learjet 23 aircraft.[3] Bruce Sundlun became EJA president in 1970, and Paul Tibbetts became president in 1976. [4] By the late 1970s, EJA was doing business with approximately 250 contract flying customers and logging more than three million miles per year. Executive Jet Aviation Corporation was purchased in 1984 by former Goldman Sachs executive Richard Santulli and he became chairman and CEO of the corporation. In 1986 the NetJets program was created by Santulli as the first fractional aircraft ownership program. In 1998, after being a NetJets customer for three years, Warren Buffett, Chairman & CEO of the Berkshire Hathaway company, acquired NetJets Inc.[3] In early August of 2009 Santulli resigned as CEO and was replaced by David Sokol. [5] NetJets Inc. has moved its corporate headquarters from New Jersey back to its original home in Columbus, Ohio, following the departure of the company's founder, Richard Santulli

First Visit

First Visit
Made by Jerry.B9
Circa 1986 and taken with my Nikon F301 SLR - re-photographed with a Nikon Coolpix in 2010. One of the 7 famous British Airways operated Concordes which paid Exeter Airport a series of visits virtually every year from 1986 up until it ceased flying in October 2003. 'Special Flights' were laid on allowing 'ordinary' 'Joe Public' the chance to fly on this amazing aircraft - either on a hour and 30 minute 'MACH 2' dash around the Bay of Biscay; or a 30 minute sub-sonic flight either to; or from London Heathrow. Naturally, there was a price difference, but only a fraction of the approx £5000 ticket price for a business person crossing between London and new York. A number of UK regional airports hosted Concorde during the summer months for these flights and they proved very popular, drawing huge crowds of spectators to see it. Such a shame that this classic Anglo-French aircraft has passed into history - gone, but definitely not forgotten. Seen here parked on the Apron at Exeter not long after landing on it's very first visit in 1986, the passengers have disembarked and the turn-around process has begun. The aircraft arrived from a sub-sonic flight from Heathrow. 100 lucky passengers were about to board for their MACH2 jaunt around the Bay of Biscay. After this more passengers would take the return Exeter-Heathrow sub-sonic flight, followed by a 4 hour bus ride home. Again, I have misplaced the negs and resorted to photographing the print and tweaking on Elements 7 to produce this not too bad a result.

Harrier GR.3

Harrier GR.3
Made by Jerry.B9
Circa Summer 1988 seen taxying for departure after taking part in Exeter Airport's 50th Anniversary Air Show is a Harrier GR.3 belonging to 233 (Operational Conversion Unit (OCU). Two Harriers were in attendance, one on static display, and the other giving a typically unique 'Harrier's' performance in the flying display - a 600kt high-speed pass to a 'hovering ballet' defying all logic of what an aircraft can do. Impressive!! The Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.3 was the first generation of the Harrier series, the first operational close-support and reconnaissance fighter aircraft with Vertical/Short Takeoff and Landing (V/STOL) capabilities, colloquially referred to as a jump jet. The Harrier was the only truly successful V/STOL design of the many that arose from the 1960s. In the 1970s, the Harrier was developed into the radar-equipped BAE Sea Harrier for the Royal Navy. The Harrier was also extensively redesigned as the BAE Harrier II and AV-8B Harrier II, which were built by British Aerospace and McDonnell Douglas. The first major combat experience for the Harrier in British service was during the Falklands War when ten Harrier GR.3s of No. 1 Squadron RAF were operated from HMS Hermes. GR3's were retired during the 1990s, and now all Harriers in RAF / Royal Navy use are being retired following defence cuts. In my view a major travesty given the all round and unique role that this classic and famous aircraft could achieve. Taken with my Nikon F301, and scanned in 2011.

Crownair DC-8

Crownair DC-8
Made by Jerry.B9
Circa July 1989 and taken with my Nikon F301 SLR - scanned in 2010. Seen during its landing roll on Runway 08, the arrival this Crownair DC-8 marked the start direct holiday charter flights between Toronto (Canada) and Exeter, which still continue to the present day. I believe it was the first time that a DC-8 had been to Exeter as well. However, Crownair's association with the service lasted less than three months as despite the company only being formed in 1989, it soon ran into serious financial difficulties and ceased trading almost as quickly as it started. I was caught up in the fall out just over three months from this shot being taken. Two weeks after this shot, I was on this very aircraft Canada bound for a three month trip to do some flying courses at a small airstrip 45 miles west of Toronto. When it was time to come home, Crownair was no more and myself and all of the other passengers were transferred to World Ways and a Lockheed Tristar flight back to Cardiff, not Exeter. After a two hour bus transfer we finally made Exeter. Ironically, World Ways picked up the mantle for a couple of years operating the Toronto-Exeter link, before it too went under in 1991. I was really pleased to have had a flight on this veteran airliner, no GPS, flyby wire or other fancy kit, just good old reliable 1950s technology, and I was able to spend a good hour up front with the extremely laid back, but very friendly crew during the mid Atlantic phase of the flight.

Team Viper, Hawker Hunter(s)

Team Viper, Hawker Hunter(s)
Made by vaughaag
Team Vipers Hawker Hunter(s) at Exeter International Airport. Seen here carrying out a high speed run and break into the left hand circuit at Exeter International Airport. G-ETPS (XE601), (red white and blue), Originally a MK6 and first flew May 1956, converted to a Mk9 in 1965 and operated by the Fast Jet Squadron at Boscombe Down until 1999. G-BWGL (XF357 now N-321), (silver and orange), Built as F4 but converted to a T8 in 1958/9. It then spent the remainder of its service life with the Royal Navy. The aircraft is now in the Dutch Royal Air Force markings and is based in the Netherlands. The Team was out playing whilst being filmed by the BBC. Team Viper ™ is the only Strikemaster & Hunter Team in the World. Flying a combination of Supersonic Hawker Hunter jets and BAC 176 Strikemasters the jets convey an aura of classical elegance, which we affectionately describe as Power, Heritage and Soul. As the only such team in the World, we aim to show these unique and incredible fighter jets and classic jet aviation, in a way that is both elegantly extreme and totally unique. The team is named after the Rolls Royce Viper engine found in the Strikemaster and both aircraft have a very rich heritage around the World, as a significant export success for Britain and were flown by many air forces globally as front line fighters. The team is completely unique being both privately owned and flown by military pilots from the British Royal Air Force.

Concorde Close Encounter

Concorde Close Encounter
Made by Jerry.B9
Circa 1987 and taken with my Nikon F301 SLR - scanned in 2010. One of the 7 famous British Airways operated Concordes which paid Exeter Airport a series of visits virtually every year from 1986 up until it ceased flying in October 2003. 'Special Flights' were laid on allowing 'ordinary' 'Joe Public' the chance to fly on this amazing aircraft - either on a hour and 30 minute 'MACH 2' dash around the Bay of Biscay; or a 30 minute sub-sonic flight either to; or from London Heathrow. Naturally, there was a price difference, but only a fraction of the approx £5000 ticket price for a business person crossing between London and new York. A number of UK regional airports hosted Concorde during the summer months for these flights and they proved very popular, drawing huge crowds of spectators to see it, as can be seen in the shot above. This is a sight that definitely would not be allowed under the very strict and enhanced Security requirements of present day airports. Note the very close proximity of the crowd line, and some of the individuals virtually on th edge of the taxiway. Although using a zoom lens, I was still only a few yards away from the edge of the taxiway myself. Even though I had ear defenders on, the noise was incredible. Seen on a dull Summer's day taxying along the then 'Western Taxiway' (Taxiway A(lpha) now) towards the Apron on it's second ever visit in 1987. On this occasion it night-stopped.

Queens Flight BAe142 ZE710

Queens Flight BAe142 ZE710
Made by vaughaag
Queens Flight BAe142 ZE710, parked on stand 9 at Exeter International Airport overnight, 5th December 2010. ZE701 was built in 1985, construction number 1029 LN:29 On 1 April 1995 The Queen's Flight was merged into No. 32 Squadron RAF to become No. 32 (The Royal) Squadron. Its BAe 146s and two Westland Wessex HCC.4 helicopters moved from Benson to 32 Squadron's base at RAF Northolt. This ended the RAF's provision of dedicated VIP transport aircraft; the aircraft of 32 Squadron are only available to VIP passengers if not needed for military operations. This was declared officially in 1999, with the Ministry of Defence stating the principal purpose of 32 Squadron [is] to provide communications and logistical support to military operations; the Squadron's capacity should be based on military needs only; and any royal or other non-military use of... spare capacity is secondary to its military purpose. The effect of this declaration was to radically reduce the charge per hour to the royal travel grant-in-aid for flying in an RAF jet, because now only the variable costs of the flight were expensed to the royal travel budget. In the 2007/2008 fiscal year only 9% of the flying hours of the squadron were devoted to flying the Royal Family and their staff. The Squadron also has six smaller British Aerospace BAe 125 CC3 jets, which seat a maximum of six passengers. The last of these jets was delivered in February 1984.

Hawker Hunter T7, G-VETA XL600

Hawker Hunter T7, G-VETA XL600
Made by vaughaag
FACEBOOK - DV Photo Seen here breaking away after a very fast run and break, runway 08 at Exeter International Airport. Hawker Hunter T7, G-VETA (XL600), built in 1958 and flew with 65(F) Squadron and Wattisham Station Flight. In 1963 XL600's 2nd pilot was killed when the ejecter seat went activated. Now privately owned—VETA stands for Very Expensive Toy Airplane. Team Viper ™ is the only Strikemaster & Hunter Team in the World. Flying a combination of Supersonic Hawker Hunter jets and BAC 176 Strikemasters the jets convey an aura of classical elegance, which we affectionately describe as Power, Heritage and Soul. As the only such team in the World, we aim to show these unique and incredible fighter jets and classic jet aviation, in a way that is both elegantly extreme and totally unique. The team is named after the Rolls Royce Viper engine found in the Strikemaster and both aircraft have a very rich heritage around the World, as a significant export success for Britain and were flown by many air forces globally as front line fighters. The team is completely unique being both privately owned and flown by military pilots from the British Royal Air Force.

RomBAC and The Rainbow

RomBAC and The Rainbow
Made by Jerry.B9
Circa 1986 and taken with my Nikon F301 - scanned 2010. Seen on the Apron at Exeter, one of Adria Airways Rom.BAC-1-11-561RCs is waiting for its passengers prior to departing back to either Pula or Split in the then Yugoslavia, now Croatia. The British Aircraft Corporation One-Eleven, also known as the BAC-111 or the BAC-1-11, was a British short-range jet airliner of the 1960s and 1970s. Conceived by Hunting Aircraft, it was developed and produced by the British Aircraft Corporation when Hunting merged into BAC along with other British aircraft makers in 1960. It was designed to replace the Vickers Viscount turbo-prop on short-range routes. In 1979 a deal was made with Romania that the BAC-1-11 could be built under licence in that country. The Romanian aircraft became known as RomBAC-1-11s. This aircraft was operated initially by Tarom of Romania before being leased to Adria. Adria continues as the State Airline of Slovenia, although the RomBac / BAC-1-11s have long since been retired from service, being far too noisy and environmental unfriendly against the modern generation of aircraft. The aircraft's Rolls-Royce Spey engines were the same engines that powered the RAF's and the Royal Navy's F-4K/M Phantom fighter aircraft, although without the afterburner capability.

Hawker Hunter T7, G-VETA XL600

Hawker Hunter T7, G-VETA XL600
Made by vaughaag
FACEBOOK - DV Photo Hawker Hunter T7, G-VETA (XL600), built in 1958 and flew with 65(F) Squadron and Wattisham Station Flight. In 1963 XL600's 2nd pilot was killed when the ejecter seat went activated. Now privately owned—VETA stands for Very Expensive Toy Airplane. Team Viper ™ is the only Strikemaster & Hunter Team in the World. Flying a combination of Supersonic Hawker Hunter jets and BAC 176 Strikemasters the jets convey an aura of classical elegance, which we affectionately describe as Power, Heritage and Soul. As the only such team in the World, we aim to show these unique and incredible fighter jets and classic jet aviation, in a way that is both elegantly extreme and totally unique. The team is named after the Rolls Royce Viper engine found in the Strikemaster and both aircraft have a very rich heritage around the World, as a significant export success for Britain and were flown by many air forces globally as front line fighters. The team is completely unique being both privately owned and flown by military pilots from the British Royal Air Force.

Air Tahiti Nui, A340-300

Air Tahiti Nui, A340-300
Made by vaughaag
Air Tahiti Nui, A340-300 at Exeter International Airport, 7th October 2010. The day started out particularly foggy making for some interesting shots. I went into work an hour and half early to catch the best morning light. The aircraft arrived at Exeter on October 6th carrying over 140 Royal Marines after completing a tour in Afghanistan. Air Tahiti Nui was established on 31 October 1996 and commenced flight operations on 20 November 1998. It is the first international airline based in Papeete, Tahiti, formed to develop inbound tourism. The government of French Polynesia is the major shareholder (61.7%) along with other local investors. Currently, Air Tahiti Nui has 782 employees. The Airbus A340 is a long-range four-engined wide-body commercial passenger airliner manufactured by Airbus, a subsidiary of EADS. It seats up to 375 passengers in the standard variants and 440 in the stretched 600 series, and has a range between 6,700 and 9,000 nmi (12400 to 16600 km). It is similar in design to the twin-engined A330 with which it was concurrently designed. Initial A340 versions share the fuselage and wing of the A330 while later models are longer and have larger wings.

Fairey Firefly AS.5

Fairey Firefly AS.5
Made by Jerry.B9
Circa 1988 taken with my Nikon F301 - scanned 2010. Seen taxiing away from the apron at Exeter Airport was the last surviving airworthy Fairey Firefly, operated by the Royal Navy Historic Flight, based at RNAS Yeovilton in Somerset. Built at Hayes, Middlesex, it was delivered to the Fleet Air Arm in June 1949 at RNAS Culham, where it was prepared for front-line service. The Firefly was designed during the latter stages of WWII as a carrier-borne fighter and anti-submarine aircraft. WB271 (above) was an anti-submarine aircraft, which carried American sonobuoys and equipment. This aircraft was destined for operational service in the Korean War, but instead was transferred to the Royal Australian Navy from which it was retired from srvice in the mid 1960s. Brought back to the Uk and rstored to full flying status, it remained with the RNHF performing at many airshows and displays. It was painted in Korean War Markings of a 812 NAS aircraft, wearing the code '204' and port code 'R'. Tragically the aircraft crashed at the Flying Legends Airshow at Duxford on 12th July 2003, killing the two RNHF crew on board, RNHF CO Bill Murton and RNHF Firefly navigator Neil Rix.

Red Arrows at Dusk

Red Arrows at Dusk
Made by vaughaag
Red Arrows at Dusk Red Arrows, visiting Exeter International Airport, 25th August 2010. The Reds base at Exeter every year near the end of August for the displays at Torbay and Dartmouth. The Red Arrows, officially known as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, is the aerobatics display team of the Royal Air Force. Based at RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, UK, they are soon to move to RAF Waddington. They were formed in late 1964 as an all-RAF team, replacing a number of unofficial teams that had been sponsored by RAF commands. The Red Arrows badge shows the aircraft in their trademark diamond nine formation, with the motto Éclat, a French word meaning brilliance or excellence. Initially, they were equipped with seven Folland Gnat trainers inherited from the RAF Yellowjacks display team. This aircraft was chosen because it was less expensive to operate than front-line fighters. In their first season, they flew at 65 shows across Europe. In 1966, the team was increased to nine members, enabling them to develop their Diamond Nine formation. In late 1979, they switched to the BAE Hawk trainer. The Red Arrows have performed over 4,000 displays worldwide in 53 countries

Cimber Air CRJ-100LR OY-RJD

Cimber Air CRJ-100LR OY-RJD
Made by vaughaag
Cimber Air CRJ-100 OY-RJD getting airborne at Exeter International Airport off runway 26, 11th September 2010. Cimber Sterling Group A/S is the holding company of the subsidiaries Cimber Sterling A/S, Cimber Air-Leasing A/S, Cimber Air Data A/S, Cimber Air Maintenance Center A/S and Sterling Air A/S. All subsidiaries are wholly owned by the company and subject to Danish law, except Cimber Air GmbH, which is subject to German law. Cimber Sterling A/S holds all shares in Cimber Air Aircraft ApS. The Cimber Sterling fleet consists of modern and comfortable turboprop aircraft of the type ATR 42 seating of 48 passengers and ATR 72 seating 66 passengers; all members of the new generation of regional short sector aircraft. With its environmental friendliness, modern design and reliability, this French-produced aircraft has become a global success. For regional flights Cimber Sterling operates Canadair regional jet from the manufacturer, Bombardier Aerospace Inc. i Canada. The A/C is a CRJ 200 seating 50 passengers. For long international flights, and the most popular flights, Cimber Sterling use Boeing-737 Jets. The Boeing 737-700 seats 149 passengers.

Red Arrows

Red Arrows
Made by vaughaag
Red Arrows, visiting Exeter International Airport, 25th August 2010. The Reds base at Exeter every year near the end of August for the displays at Torbay and Dartmouth. The Red Arrows, officially known as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, is the aerobatics display team of the Royal Air Force. Based at RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, UK, they are soon to move to RAF Waddington. They were formed in late 1964 as an all-RAF team, replacing a number of unofficial teams that had been sponsored by RAF commands. The Red Arrows badge shows the aircraft in their trademark diamond nine formation, with the motto Éclat, a French word meaning brilliance or excellence. Initially, they were equipped with seven Folland Gnat trainers inherited from the RAF Yellowjacks display team. This aircraft was chosen because it was less expensive to operate than front-line fighters. In their first season, they flew at 65 shows across Europe. In 1966, the team was increased to nine members, enabling them to develop their Diamond Nine formation. In late 1979, they switched to the BAE Hawk trainer. The Red Arrows have performed over 4,000 displays worldwide in 53 countries



Nearest places of interest:

Westpoint Showground
Clyst St Mary
Woodbury Salterton
Woodbury
  Rockbeare
The Jack in the Green Inn
Clyst Rovers Football Club
Broadclyst

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