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Bogor

Bogor boasts a presidential palace, a deer park and a botanical garden in the town centre. It is home to the Bogor Agricultural Institute (IPB).

Amusement Park

In the Botanical Garden on a typical rainy day
  • Botanical Garden . Bogor's pride and joy, the extensive Botanical Gardens were founded in 1811 as a private garden of the Governor-General's summer residence by Sir Stamford Raffles, who also went on to found . However, it was Casper Reinwardt who adopted the gardens for more scientific use, with Johannes Elias Teysmann continuing in his footsteps. Today, the gardens stretch out over 87 hectares, parts carefully manicured like the palace gardens they are, parts seeming like wild jungle at first glance (if not for the tags detailing where every tree and plant comes from), with lakes, two rivers and hilly trails. If you're lucky, you may be able to spot a blooming giant arum , the world's tallest inflorescence (flower cluster) which can reach an astounding 2.5 meters — but, alas, smells like rotting meat. Open from 8 AM to 5 PM daily, although (despite the size!) they can get crowded on Sundays. Entry is Rp 5,500 for people, Rp 10,000 for cars, which can also drive around on main roads and are a bit of a nuisance.
  • Presidential Palace , in the northwest corners of the Botanical Gardens. Originally the summer residence of the Governor-General of Java, now one of the Indonesian president's summer escapes and noted for the 250 tame deer grazing in its grounds. The palace grounds can be visited from within the Gardens, but tours in the palace require 5 days advance notification — however, the Bogor TIC (see ) may be able to squeeze you in at short notice there's a tour going on.
  • Orchid Garden , in the northeast corner of the Botanical Gardens. Large greenhouse housing orchids of all shapes and sizes, with two separate halls so there's always something blooming. Entry Rp 2000, separately charged.

Monuments

  • Kujang, at triangle park on Jl. Pajajaran, Jl. Otista and Jl. Baranangsiang. This statue commemorated the struggle for Indonesian Independence by people in West Java. Kujang is a traditional weapon from West Java.
  • Batutulis, at Batutulis village, Bogor. A carved stone to commemorate King Siliwangi from Kingdom of Pajajaran. Created in 1533 by King Surawisesa, son of King Siliwangi.
  • Cirauteun, at Cirauteun, Ciampea, Bogor. A large carved stone to commemarate King Pakuan from Kingdom of Taruma (5th century).


Location is derived from the great work of WikiMapia

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Lotus: Nelumbo nucifera, Kebun Raya, Bogor, Java, Indonesia

Lotus: Nelumbo nucifera, Kebun Raya, Bogor, Java, Indonesia
Made by Rana Pipiens
When the reconstituted Dutch government in 1817 took repossession of their East Indian colony (since 1946, of course, the independent country of Indonesia) from the the English who had administered it during the time that The Netherlands had lost its own independence to Napoleon, they were determined to do more than merely exploit the wealth of its natural resources. They also meant to encyclopedically study the culture and the natural pheonomena of the colony they had regained. One of the first things they did to that end was to establish the Botanical Garden of Bogor (then called Buitenzorg (=Sans Souci; Without a Care in the World) on Java, on the slopes of the Pangrango and Salak Mountains just to the south of Jakarta) next to the Governor General's palace. The initiative for this significant feat came from Casper Georg Carl Reinwardt (1773-1854), a German naturalist in Dutch service who later went on to become a professor of natural philosophy at the renowned university of Leiden. The work by Reinwardt and his successors gave rise to the famous and beautiful Botanical Garden of today, then called 's Lands Plantentuin, now the Kebun Raya (= the Big Garden), on the banks of the Ciliwung River. Not only is it a delightful place for relaxation, but it has been and still is an important institute as well for research into botany and agriculture. Plants such as the Cassava (manioc), the Oil Palm, and Cinchona (the source of quinine; Jesuit Bark until then only available from remote areas of South America) were first tested here for their practical sustainability and then developed for production; cinchona research and production was soon however moved to the higher and cooler altitude of Cibodas just off the Puncak Pass. Cassava provides nutrition when rice harvests fail; palm oil is still economically extremely important as a main export product; natural quinine was the only cure for malaria and it was for more than half a century provided to the world mainly by the plantations of the Dutch East Indies. The importance of the Garden for Indonesia and, indeed, the world is evident. But the Kebun Raya is also striking to the eye of any naturalist, amateur or not, and for anyone who visits, as is clear from this photo of a lotus in one of the many ponds of the Garden. Beloved on Java for its colors and the legends associated with it, the kids, dote on the lotus too. The seeds - in the little holes in its 'heart' (in fact: 'nucifera' means as much as 'carrying nodes or nuts') - are a delicacy sold in the market as 'biji taratai'. They can be eaten 'natural', or caramelised or in glutinous rice, etc. Sacred Beans for mundane use!

The Beauty of Nectary Green. Salacia intermedia Ding Hou, Kebun Raya, Bogor, Indonesia

The Beauty of Nectary Green. Salacia intermedia Ding Hou, Kebun Raya, Bogor, Indonesia
Made by Rana Pipiens
Such a joy always to visit the great botanical garden, the Kebun Raya, at Bogor, Java, Indonesia. Founded in the early nineteenth century in the then Dutch East Indies, it became well-known as 's Lands Plantentuin, The Nation's Garden of Plants. There were gathered tropical plants from the entire Indies and Southeast Asia and further afield. At first it was primarily an agricultural institute for the study of plants that might be economically worthwhile. Among many examples: it was here that the first four West-African oil palms were planted (around 1850). From the seed of those four sprang up the multi-million dollar industry of palm oil today in especially Malaysia and Indonesia. Another example is the cultivation of Cinchona, the plant used to treat malaria. But the Kebun Raya also has horticultural aspects, of course. Today it remains one of the premier botanical research institutes in the world. A joy, I said, to visit and revisit. But some sadness as well: gardens such as this one are not only expensive to maintain. There's also lack of taxonomical expertise and thoroughness 'in practice'. Thus for example in this beautiful garden the erstwhile magnificent collection of Zingiberaceae (Gingers) and of Acanthaceae (Acanthus) has fallen into extreme neglect and disrepair. The many plant beds are overrun with weeds and their original denizens have often withered away. Signs have suffered by having been repainted over the years by people with a lack of knowledge of precise spellings (among others I noticed this solecism: 'Aclicia scundiflora (Blume)'. Moreover, the park is opened to cars at the weekends, and the general public leaves an awful lot of rubbish. Still: very glad I came again. Especially because I now saw a plant in blossom which I'd not experienced before. This is Salacia intermedia Ding Hou. Dr Ding Hou (1921-2008), formidable botanist, found it in southern Sulawesi at the beginning of the 1960s. Linnaeus had earlier in the mid eighteenth century mistaken the very fleshy nectary of Salacia - in this photo of 'intermedia' topped by those orange stamina - for their ovary. He'd placed them under the Gynandria. Only later was the family renamed Salacia. The flowers of this particular shrub - Salacia also manifests as a vine - measure 3-4 mm across. So beautiful... and easily overlooked or, worse, ignored.

Ibu Sopiah, Rice Cake Seller

Ibu Sopiah, Rice Cake Seller
Made by DMahendra
Let me introduce you to Ibu Sopiah, a struggling street vendor at the Bogor train station. Once you get to hear her stories, it becomes repetitive: She, and many others like her comes to the station on foot to sell a bag full of rice cakes. When other women at her age are preparing breakfast for their family at the break of dawn or sipping tea on the front porch in the morning, she prepares herself to catch the first wave of commuters at the station bound for Jakarta . She shrugged her shoulder when I ask permission to photograph her “I am not pretty” she said with a faint smile. I took several shots, but I think this one comes out the best. Sopiah – like many Indonesian who has only one name – always comes prepared with the typical sets of property: a flask to keep hot water, a belt of instant coffee sachets, a jar of sugar, and a large plastic bag of rice cakes. She never forgets to bring along a handful of chili pepper – for her customers who like to have their rice cakes extra spicy. She told me that she lives just north of the station, near a market. “Every afternoon, I come back again to sell fried bananas and cassavas” she added. fried bananas is a favorite snack among Indonesian. She didn't say much about her children or her husband's work. “I make just enough money for my family” she claims of the money she brings home every day. When I guess a value ($10), she quickly shook her head “oh no, not that much.” But from the way she dresses, it looks like she is well off compared with the others. I can’t imagine how she and her family could cover basic health, education cost and other living expenses even with her husband probably working. Her family is essentially trying to struggle to live on a day-by-day basis – not knowing what the future lies for them. The Bogor train station is a magnet for people like Sopiah. Street vendors, porters, pushers and beggars take up what little space they have to earn a living. A few bucks a day can go a long way.

Kebun Raya - Bogor (Java - Indonesia)

Kebun Raya - Bogor (Java - Indonesia)
Made by Meteorry
Kebun Raya 02/03/2011 09h38 Bogor is city famous for its cool temperatures and rain. During our visit we had lots of sunshine despite of the wet season. Bogor Botanical Gardens The Bogor Botanical Gardens (Indonesian: Kebun Raya) are located 60 km south of the capital of Jakarta in Bogor, Indonesia. The botanical gardens are situated in the city center of Bogor and adjoin the Istana Bogor (Presidential Palace). The gardens cover more than 80 hectares and was built by Java's Dutch Governor-General Gustaaf Willem, Baron van Imhoff who was governor of Java at the time. The extensive grounds of the presidential palace were converted into the gardens by the German-born Dutch botanist, Professor Casper George Carl Reinwardt. The gardens officially opened in 1817 as 's Lands Plantentuin ('National Botanical Garden') and were used to research and develop plants and seeds from other parts of the Indonesian archipelago for cultivation during the 19th century. This is a tradition that continues today and contributes to the garden's reputation as a major center for botanical research. Today the garden contains more than 15,000 species of trees and plants located among streams and lotus ponds. There are 400 types of exceptional palms to be found along the extensive lawns and avenues, helping the gardens create a refuge for more than 50 different varieties of birds and for groups of bats roosting high in the trees. The bats can be easily detected by the noise they make while competing for space under the canopies. The orchid houses contain some 3000 varieties. In 1862, the Cibodas Botanical Gardens were founded as an extension of the Bogor garden at Cibodas, approximately 45 kilometers to the southeast of Bogor. [ Source: Wikipedia - Bogor Botanical Gardens ]

"Most strikingly superb...". Head-on: Amherstia nobilis. The Pride of Burma in the Kebun Raya, Bogor, Java, Indonesia

"Most strikingly superb...". Head-on: Amherstia nobilis. The Pride of Burma in the Kebun Raya, Bogor, Java, Indonesia
Made by Rana Pipiens
There can be no question that this tree, when in full foliage and blossom, is the most strikingly superb object which can possibly be imagined. In this way Nathaniel Wallich (1806-1854) in 1830 waxes eloquent over his discovery in Burma in the footsteps of John Crawfurd (1783-1868) of this indeed very bright and pretty tree. His precise description of the tree and its flowers (in botanical Latin), the vicissitudes of its discovery, and the usage of the flower in ceremonies for the Buddha make for fascinating reading. Wallich also explains that he named it Amherstia for the intrepid explorers and lovers of all things natural, the Countess Amherst and her daughter Sarah. They were among the very first Europeans to explore northern India (e.g. Simla) and the Himalayas. It can be imagined that with such a description this tree became highly desirable for anyone in the know. Soon it was being planted in Botanic Gardens throughout Asia (e.g. in the gardens of the (British) East India Company at what was then known as Calcutta, and a bit later at 's Lands Plantentuin (Kebun Raya) at Buitenzorg (Bogor) on Java, Indonesia). Not less eloquent on its beauty is William Jackson Hooker ( 1785-1865) in 1850, earlier professor of Botany at Glasgow. As the first director of the Kew Botanic Gardens he wrote: If, as we suppose, it must be conceded that the Victoria Reginae is the most splendid flowering herbaceous plant yet known to us, we may with equal justice say that the Amherstia nobilis is the most superb flowering arborescent plant. (Ah! and just look at Hooker's optimism: yet known to us...) Indeed, the tree is magnificent and it stunned me as well when I first gazed upon it in the Kebun Raya at Bogor, Java, Indonesia, as it was overhanging a small stream.

Indonesia - Java - Bogor - Kebun Raya Bogor (Bogor Botanic Garden)

Indonesia - Java - Bogor - Kebun Raya Bogor (Bogor Botanic Garden)
Made by Stewart Leiwakabessy
Kebun Raya Bogor 13 Jalan Otto Iskandardinata - Paledang Bogor, Indonesië (0)25 132 2226 The botanical Garden can be found in Bogor, about 60KM south from Jakarta. Opened in 1817 as 's Lands Plantentuin ('National Botanical Garden') and used ever since to research and develop plants and seeds from other parts of the Indonesian archipelago for cultivation. More information here. Bogor (Indonesian: Kota Bogor) is a city in the West Java (province of Indonesia). Located about 60 kilometers away from Jakarta. Bogor itself is a recognized as a municipality (cat); it is an important economic, scientific, cultural and tourist center, as well as a mountain resort. During the Dutch colonization of Indonesia, it was named Buitenzorg and served as the summer residence of the Governor-General of Dutch East Indies. The city was the administrative center of the Netherlands East Indies during the British control in the early 19th century. Bogor is one of the world's most densely populated areas. The city has a presidential palace and a botanical garden (Indonesian: Kebun Raya Bogor) – one of the oldest and largest in the world. It bears the nickname the Rain City (Kota Hujan), because of frequent rain showers. It nearly always rains even during the dry season. More information at wikipedia.

Sabrina, Street Performer

Sabrina, Street Performer
Made by DMahendra
Meet Sabrina (14), who like many others is a street performer on the KRL Economy Jabotabek commuter train. The commuter train links the city of Bogor and Jakarta. Back stage, her real name is Alifah. She lives with her parents in a small town called Cilebut - just half an hour away from Bogor by train. I am supposed to be in junior high, she told me when I ask if she goes to school, and she added quickly I stop going to school because I need to support my family. Her dream is to be a famous pop singer. Although at this moment, she admits that she is comfortable singing on the train. To entertain the passengers, she sings mostly local pop and a few popular dangdut songs . Sabrina wears a long Muslim dress and has a fair skin, when I ask her to smile for the camera, she hesitated for a second but then let go. She starts early in the morning and earns around $3 before she heads home in the afternoon. Gender slurs, verbal assaults, and sexual harassments are something of a commonality for her. She thinks it's the risk although she has no idea why they treat her that way.

Recalling Bogor on Idul Adha. Bogor, Java, Indonesia

Recalling Bogor on Idul Adha. Bogor, Java, Indonesia
Made by Rana Pipiens
Looking down from the rooftop parking lot of Bogor Trade Mall in Bogor, Java, Indonesia... There's a little peninsula in the crux of the Cisadane and the Cibalok rivers. Once this was a simple, garden Kampung, but now it's become a thriving and busy little suburb of Bogor. Caught tightly between the pretty red-tiled roofs is this pastel-blue mosque. Today is what the Indonesians call Idul Adha, and what is known officially in the world of Islam as the Eid-ul-Adha or among Muslims in North Africa as the Eid-el-Kibir. It is the Festival of Sacrifice and it commemorates Allah's mercy shown to Ibrahim when he was about to obey His command to sacrifice his own son (in the Muslim tradition called Ishmael). Instead - seeing his love - Allah put a lamb in Ishmael's place. This is especially for my Muslim friends.

Bogor Presidential Palace (Istana Bogor)

Bogor Presidential Palace (Istana Bogor)
Made by Nokén
HDR; 3 exposures; handheld. The grounds of the estate contain several buildings - the largest of which is the main palace and its two wings. The main palace contains private offices for the head of state, a library, a dining room, a ministers' meeting room, a theater room, and the Garuda room (for welcoming State guests). The two wings are used as the guest residences for State guests. Kebun Raya Bogor (Great Gardens of Bogor, the Bogor Botanical Gardens are also part of the palace grounds. The palace houses an extensive art collection which had been accumulated by Soekarno. A herd of spotted deer still range within the palace grounds; a group of these had originally been brought there by the Dutch for hunting and sport. (http://visit-to-indonesia.blogspot.com/2007/09/bogor-presidential-palace.html)

Tool of the Trade

Tool of the Trade
Made by DMahendra
The disrepair of the economy-class electric train (KRL-Ekonomi) that runs the Bogor-Jakarta line is in such a state - with broken doors, glassless windows, peeling floors, and leaky rooftops - that it creates opportunity and generates income for others. Barefooted, Dudi and Bari [foreground] stand closely together and try to fight against the chilly wind pouring in with such intensity through a large entrance doors. They are floor sweepers sharing the same line. They both clutch a broomstick - the only valuable piece of item in their possession, and a tool of the trade that could make a difference between earning $3 or nothing at all - that would someday bring hope, and a better future. EOS-1N-HS Fuji100 EF 17-40 L scanned

Dual Mode

Dual Mode
Made by firdaus usman
It's dual mode time! My Flickr friend just interested on analog film slr. Previously he had the lovely Nikon D40x with his bokehlicious 35mm F1.8 (effective in 50mm) then our friend Luluk borrowed him a Pentak K1000 film slr combined with helios lens 50mm F1.8.. to poisoned him with film camera hehe :D I got you dude, on Dual mode (slr and digital) exposure.. enjoyed the cult of film mode hehe :D -- Oh dear i a little bit left behind on up load our last Bogor Hunting because the roll is just developed this day. I'm sorry the economic recession coming after me hehe :p 15 August 2009 Vihara Dhanagun Bogor, Indonesia Canon AE-1 50mm F1.8sc Fuji Superia ASA200

CKG-Bogor-David Kwa at his house

CKG-Bogor-David Kwa at his house
Made by Godam.
We needed help from someone who understand Melayu Rendah (or Melayu Lingua Franca according to writer Pramoedya Ananta Toer) for a planned movie. The language was popular until early 1900s, when politics started to intervene. Nowadays most Indonesian have some grasp of the language, but only a handful could use it properly. It was still widely used until the 1950s by mainly Peranakan writers, a creole culture of mixed Chinese Indonesian heritage. A forgotten language of a disappearing culture. Mr Kwa, an expert in Peranakan Chinese culture, offered his expertise. We met him at his quaint house in the Ciliwung river valley. Rolleiflex 2.8B TriX 400 @250 D76

a short visit to Vihara Dhanagun

a short visit to Vihara Dhanagun
Made by Luluk
at Jalan Surya Kencana, Bogor - West Java. i'm too sleepy to put any description here, but if you want to know more about the complete history of this place, please directly go thru this link (in bahasa). --- yes, this was part of our trip to Bogor last Saturday. Dik Daus (or others), feel free to drop some lines on the comment box if you know something about this place. You had a talk with the care-takers, no?

The Way You Shot [:D]

The Way You Shot [:D]
Made by firdaus usman
From my last meet up at Bogor. We visited the Dhanagun Vihara and taking a lot of shot here... Vihara Dhanagun is one of the oldest Vihara at Bogor. First build from the bamboo construction at in the end of 19 century which was all surrounding area still rare of human activities until now at 2009 every corner of vihara is trapped with much modern building around. 15 August 2009 Vihara Dhanagun Bogor, Indonesia Canon AE-1 50mm F1.8sc Fuji Superia ASA 200

Poor Butterfly #1

Poor Butterfly #1
Made by -Ni'ma-
a praying mantis feeding on a butterfly Question : What are butterflies' enemies? Answer : Butterflies have many enemies. Insects may eat their eggs, birds like to eat the caterpillars and lots of things like to eat the adults. A butterfly may land on a flower only to find itself in the clutches of a hungry crab spider or being attacked by a praying mantis or damsel bug. taken from here

34/365

34/365
Made by celticsaga
the earliest shot ever snapped! me: straight out of bed into the kitchen, brought the camera to take a shot of me having breakfast. don't know what compelled me to do so. usually, i took pictures for 365 project around 9 pm - 10 pm. hihi ps: *i'm not in any artistic or creative mood since the last few days (not that i AM artistic or creative, come to think of it). hihi.

1/365

1/365
Made by celticsaga
hello there! this is my first photo for project 365 days of self portrait! me: i'm a borderline narcissist, i like looking at myself in the mirror but i don't like taking pictures of myself. this project 365 days of self portrait is going to be one hard challenge for me. hihi. ps: *this picture was taken 45 minutes before the end of January 1st.

Lead to Mango Season

Lead to Mango Season
Made by -Ni'ma-
The flowering season of mango trees is at the beginning of the rainy season and the fruits ripen at the end of the rainy season. Now we are on the middle of rainy season and the picture is the flower of mango trees, it means that we are leading to the mango season. also published in here

Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii)

Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii)
Made by mikaku
The Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) is the rarer of the two species of orangutans. The Sumatran Orangutan grows to about 4.6 feet tall and 200 pounds in males. Females are smaller, averaging 3 feet and 100 pounds. Bogor, Java, Indonesia 2010. Balifornian Tours www.Balifornian.com

The Gangs :p

The Gangs :p
Made by firdaus usman
At last i could post this group picture from our last meet up at Bogor. Because one of two roll all frames weren't scanned well... hehe.. then after rescan here the result i hope you all like it :d Here we are Me, Yudi, Khaniv, iNut, Sarie, Luluk :D SOOS Straight out of scanner 15 August 2009 Vihara Dhanagun Bogor Indonesia

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Nearest places of interest:

Universite Francaise du Pacifique (UFP)
Résidence Bopp Dupond
جبال مهدي حسو الساحرة
Papao Village
  Sukahati
Bojonggede
Telaga Kahuripan Bogor
Ragajaya

Popular places:

Jakarta
Medan
Banda Aceh
Bandung
Surakarta
Palembang
Denpasar
Semarang

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