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Bermuda Hundred, Virginia

the Bermuda Hundred, Virginia is part of Upper Shirley, United States.

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West-Shirley Plantation

West-Shirley Plantation
Made by Catcher In My Eye
Family connection... One of the bearers of the bier of Sir Phillip Sidney in 1587. Virginians know West as the first Governor for Life appointed by King James I. He was born at Wherwell in Hampshire very near the town of Whitchurch, which we believe was the home of William Shrimpton, the benefactor of Lady Dale’s will. His mother was Anne Knollys, the sister of Leticce Knollys who had first married Walter Devereaux, the 1st Earl of Essex, and then had remarried Sir Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. West served with Dale and Gates in Ireland in 1599, and was actively involved with his cousin, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, in his rebellion. At the time of Essex’s rebellion, Thomas West was a very poor Justice of the Peace living very near Titchfield, the ancestral home of his co-conspirator, the Earl of Southampton. Thomas West married 1596 Cecily Shirley, the daughter of Sir Thomas Shirley, and Thomas West established Shirley plantation on the James River across from Dales’ Point of Land. In 1606 King James I granted a charter for the settlement of South Virginia to an association of noblemen, gentlemen, and merchants. The association was known as the London Company, or the Virginia Company of London, since most of its members lived in London. The Second London Company sailed under Lord De La Warr with nine ships and 500 people. The admiral's ship named Sea Venture. They landed in America in 1610. A charter was granted to the Third London Company in 1611. In 1613 Shirley Plantation was granted to Lord De La Warr. Because of his health, West did not spend much time in Virginia, but he was the single largest investor and his extended family was quite prominent in the colonization of North America. His uncles were the privateers who had sailed in the Roanoke voyages, Captain Francis and Henry Knollys. His Aunt Leticce Knollys was the mother of the Earl of Essex, and wife of the Earl of Leicester. His brothers John West and Francis West both became Virginia Governors. Francis West settled Westover, which was on the upper James River in Virginia. Berkeley Plantation was sandwiched between Westover and Shirley’s plantation, all established between 1613 and 1619. His sister was married to the Pelhams whose children were instrumental in the colonization of New England. Lord De La Warr died on the enroute to Virginia aboard the NEPTUNE. Delaware Bay and the State of Delaware are named after him. Cecily SHIRLEY: CECILY or CECILIA SHERLEY or SHIRLEY (1570-July 31, 1662) Cecily or Cecilia Sherley or Shirley was the youngest daughter of Sir Thomas Sherley of Wiston, Sussex (May 9, 1542-October 16, 1612) and Anne Kempe (c.1544-1623). She married her father’s godson, Thomas West, 3rd baron de la Warr (July 9, 1577-June 7, 1618) in November 1596. He served in the Low Countries and was imprisoned in 1601 for supporting the earl of Essex. In 1609/10 he was appointed first Governor of Virginia. He sailed there in 1610, returned to England in 1611, sailed there again in 1617, and died at sea. Their children were Joan (c.1601-c.1650), Henry, 4th baron (October 3, 1603-June 1, 1628), Anne (c.1605-c.1660), Elizabeth (c.1606-c.1660), Cecily (c.1609-1638), Lucy (c.1611-c.1660), John (1615-October 6, 1683), Twyford (b.1616), and Catherine (c.1618-c.1660). Several of Cecily’s daughters acted with their mother in a court masque at Twelfth Night 1616/17. On September 19, 1619, Cecily was granted a pension for thirty-one years. It was renewed in 1634, stopped by the Civil War, and restored in 1662. www.kateemersonhistoricals.com/TudorWomenSa-Sn.htm

Colonial Kitchen

Colonial Kitchen
Made by John H Bowman
The kitchen at Shirley Plantation, like the ice house and the home in the two preceding photos, also is a structure dating from colonial times. Looking out from the front porch of the Great House, the kitchen and ice house both are on the left, with the kitchen being closer to the Great House; a hedge runs between them (see photo below). The second floor was living space for those who staffed the kitchen. This separate structure was the plantation kitchen until a modern kitchen was built in the basement of the Great House in the 1940s. The small structure at the left is the pump house. The kitchen and ice house both are part of the Queen Anne Forecourt, a symmetrical arrangement of four brick structures, two on each side of the walkway above (parallel to the front of the kitchen) that stretches from the front porch of the Great House to the parking area at the end of the lane leading into the plantation. Each pair of facing structures is of a single design: A two-story laundry building is directly across from the two-story kitchen, and an L-shaped, one-story store house is directly across from the matching ice house. The plantation's website says this symmetrical forecourt is the only one of its type surviving in North America; an aerial view of it can be seen if you open the link in the paragraph below and select the Home button at left. Situated on the James River in Charles City County southeast of Richmond, Shirley Plantation is the oldest plantation in the United States; it was founded in 1613, soon after the 1607 founding of the first permanent English-speaking settlement in North America at nearby Jamestown. Moreover, Shirley Plantation is the oldest family-owned business in North America dating to Edward Hill I establishing a farm in 1638. Construction of the present mansion began about 1723 when Elizabeth Hill, great-granddaughter of the first Hill, married John Carter, eldest son of Robert King Carter. Completed in 1738, the mansion, referred to as the 'Great House,' is largely in its original state and is owned, operated, and resided in by direct descendants of Edward Hill I [emphasis added].

Shirley Plantation "Great House"

Shirley Plantation "Great House"
Made by John H Bowman
Dating from the first part of the 18th century, the Great House at Shirley Plantation still is the residence of direct descendants of the home's builders. Part of the home, however, is open to tourists, along with other parts of the plantation, which is still an operating agricultural business. Situated on the James River in Charles City County southeast of Richmond, Shirley Plantation is the oldest plantation in the United States; it was founded in 1613, soon after the 1607 founding of the first permanent English-speaking settlement in North America at nearby Jamestown. Moreover, Shirley Plantation is the oldest family-owned business in North America dating to Edward Hill I establishing a farm in 1638. Construction of the present mansion began about 1723 when Elizabeth Hill, great-granddaughter of the first Hill, married John Carter, eldest son of Robert King Carter. Completed in 1738, the mansion, referred to as the 'Great House,' is largely in its original state and is owned, operated, and resided in by direct descendants of Edward Hill I [emphasis added]. Tours of the plantation include several original buildings from the colonial period, among them the first floor of the Great House, where elaborate hand-carved woodwork, family portraits, and a number of family furnishings await visitors. The plantation is said to be the most intact 18th century estate remaining in Virginia. The seemingly-unsupported flying staircase is said to be the only example of such a staircase remaining in North America. As the photos above and below show, the front and rear of the house look essentially the same. There is a very large willow oak between the house and the river that has been standing for over 350 years, but I didn't get a photo that shows it well (another visit is needed). We visited here last September while my brother and sister-in-law, Tom and Pat, were with us from Saskatoon. It was a beautiful early fall day, although the light was a bit harsh.

Ice House, Shirley Plantation

Ice House, Shirley Plantation
Made by John H Bowman
The ice house at Shirley Plantation, like the Great House (preceding photo) and the kitchen (next photo) is a structure dating from colonial times. Looking out from the front porch of the Great House, the kitchen and ice house both are on the left, with the kitchen being closer to the Great House; a hedge runs between them. The ice house and the kitchen both are part of the Queen Anne Forecourt, a symmetrical arrangement of four brick structures; the structures facing each other across a central walkway are of the same design: the two-story laundry is across from the two-story kitchen, and the L-shaped store house is across from the matching ice house. The forecourt stretches from the front porch of the Great House to the parking area at the end of the lane leading into the plantation. The plantation's website says this symmetrical forecourt is the only one of its type surviving in North America. Situated on the James River in Charles City County southeast of Richmond, Shirley Plantation is the oldest plantation in the United States; it was founded in 1613, soon after the 1607 founding of the first permanent English-speaking settlement in North America at nearby Jamestown. Moreover, Shirley Plantation is the oldest family-owned business in North America dating to Edward Hill I establishing a farm in 1638. Construction of the present mansion began about 1723 when Elizabeth Hill, great-granddaughter of the first Hill, married John Carter, eldest son of Robert King Carter. Completed in 1738, the mansion, referred to as the 'Great House,' is largely in its original state and is owned, operated, and resided in by direct descendants of Edward Hill I [emphasis added].

Picked Cotton - The Transfer

Picked Cotton - The Transfer
Made by John H Bowman
Today's batch will be my last cotton photos, at least for quite some time, but having shown cotton in a lush, green early September field, I wanted to show it as it was being harvested. Driving to Williamsburg via the route 5 scenic route the end of October 2004, we happened to come upon this cotton field that was being picked. Having never seen this operation before, Ruth Ann and I paused briefly to watch and to get a few pictures. We were not in a good location to see the picking that was being done while we were there, but we did get to see the picked cotton (deposited into the yellow hopper by the John Deere picker on the right) being dumped from the yellow hopper into the green trailer. The two preceding photos show a broad swath of unpicked cotton and a close-up of on of the cotton balls about to be picked, the foliage of the plant shriveled and brown. Like the cotton photos taken last fall, these from 2004 were taken at Shirley Plantation. Best if viewed in the light box. A Google search for cotton pickers (looking in vain for cost information) yielded many still photos and a video, most featuring John Deere pickers that look a lot like the one on the left. Unlike this one, they were bundling picked cotton into large, round bales with the circumference wrapped in plastic, very much like hay bales. Whether the method we saw being used in 2004 still is common, I don't know (I confess I didn't exhaust all the hits to see if I would find this method, as well as baling).

Cotton About to Be Picked

Cotton About to Be Picked
Made by John H Bowman
Today's batch will be my last cotton photos, at least for quite some time, but having shown cotton in a lush, green field of early September, I wanted to show it as it was being harvested. This cotton field was being picked when we happened upon it the last day of October 2004. As noted in my recent post of a cotton field photographed in early September last year -- a sea of green flecked by the white of the cotton balls -- by the time the cotton is ready for picking, the white of the cotton balls dominates, at least in part because the foliage of the cotton plants has shriveled up. The preceding photo is a close-up of one of these cotton balls and dead leaves, and the next one shows picked cotton being dumped from one large container into another, larger one, with the John Deere picker also in the photo. Like the cotton photos taken last fall, these were taken at Shirley Plantation. Best if viewed in the light box.

Cotton Ball in Late October

Cotton Ball in Late October
Made by John H Bowman
Today's batch will be my last cotton photos, at least for quite some time, but having shown cotton in a lush, green field of early September, I wanted to show it as it was being harvested. This cotton ball was photographed about seven weeks later in the year (and six years earlier) than the one in the preceding post; it was about to be harvested, as the field it was in was being picked at the time. The next two photos show a broader view of the field and the picked cotton being dumped from one large container into another, larger one with the John Deere picker also in the photo. Like last fall's cotton photos, these from 2004 are from Shirley Plantation. Best if viewed in the light box.

In the Land of Cotton

In the Land of Cotton
Made by John H Bowman
After living in the Richmond area for 30 years, I wouldn't really characterize this as the land of cotton, but some cotton still is grown around here. This cotton field is at Shirley Plantation in Charles City County, southeast of Richmond. Some years, cotton is planted in a field that borders on Route 5, a scenic route we like to take to Williamsburg and Jamestown. The field is flecked with a lot of white cotton balls among the green foliage of the plants; closer to harvesting time, the leaves shrivel up and turn brown and the white balls become more dominant (based on seeing a little of the harvesting operation six years ago).

Shirley Plantation

Shirley Plantation
Made by Rob Shenk
View of the river-side of Shirley - completed in the 1730s. This stately plantation has been home to eleven generations of Hill-Carters. Revolutionary War hero Light Horse Harry Lee, father of Robert E. Lee, was married in this house. The home was spared during the Civil War by an order issued by Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan who appreciated the care that the owners provided sick and wounded Union soldiers camped around the house in 1862. Shirley Plantation Virginia

Cotton Balls in Mid-September

Cotton Balls in Mid-September
Made by John H Bowman
Close-up of cotton balls in field at Shirley Plantation. After living in the Richmond area for 30 years, I wouldn't characterize this as the land of cotton, but some cotton still is grown around here. These cotton balls were in a field at Shirley Plantation in Charles City County, southeast of Richmond when we visited there in September.

Shirley Plantation, main house

Shirley Plantation, main house
Made by Maryann's*****Fotos
The left hand building was the laundry and the the right hand building was the kitchen. Shirley Plantation is on the James River in Virginia. The property has been in the same family for 11 generations. The grounds and the main floor of the house are open to visitors, the upper floors are still occupied by family.

SHIRLEY PLANTATION SLAVE'S MEAT RATION LIST

SHIRLEY PLANTATION SLAVE'S MEAT RATION LIST
Made by OLD VIRGINIA SURVEYOR
A list of the meat food ration allotments for the slaves of Shirley Plantation, Charles City County, July, 1861, as posted on the wall of the plantation house kitchen, taken February, 2009. Is the male slave who a year later escaped across the James to join the Union Navy somewhere on the list??

the storehouse

the storehouse
Made by phoebe reid
There are 4 outbuildings in front of the main house that all look similar to this. This is the store house. It was used to store incoming & outgoing goods too valuable to be left at the wharves.

2011JEK0725018.jpg

2011JEK0725018.jpg
Made by jeklee
Shirley, Charles City County, Virginia: cellar, north room, detail of dresser. Note mortises at right side of bench for bench along cross wall and slot cut in brick for shelf, above.

2011JEK0725017.jpg

2011JEK0725017.jpg
Made by jeklee
Shirley, Charles City County, Virginia: cellar, north room, detail of strap hinge on door to passage. Note upside-down pintle and use of rivets instead of nails to secure hinge.

The Kitchen at Shirley Plantation

The Kitchen at Shirley Plantation
Made by Rob Shenk
View of the Kitchen outbuilding on the Shirley Plantation in Virginia - one of the oldest and most distinguished pre-Revolutionary War plantations. Shirley Plantation Virginia

kitchen floor

kitchen floor
Made by phoebe reid
Wonderful floor in the kitchen building. The two rooms on the first level were used for cooking and preparing meals. The cooks & their families lived on the second floor.

Shirley Plantation

Shirley Plantation
Made by Rob Shenk
View of the front of Shirley. Completed in the 1730s, this stately Virginia plantation has been the home to eleven generations of Hill-Carters. Shirley Plantation Virginia

Shirley Plantation, kitchen building

Shirley Plantation, kitchen building
Made by Maryann's*****Fotos
Virginia: This plantation has been in the same family for 11 generations. Though it is open to the public as an historic site, part of the family still lives there.

2011JEK0725027.jpg

2011JEK0725027.jpg
Made by jeklee
Shirley, Charles City County, Virginia: cellar, north room, detail of dresser. This is one of only two surviving 18th-century kitchen dressers in Virginia.



Nearest places of interest:

City Marina
Beacon Theather
Appomattox Manor
City Point Unit of the Petersburg National Battlefield
  Canal on the James River
Shirley Plantation
Deep Bottom Park
Varina-Enon Bridge

PanoramioFlickr CC