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NYPD 52nd Precinct

the NYPD 52nd Precinct is part of The Bronx .

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52nd Police Precinct Station House

52nd Police Precinct Station House
Made by Emilio Guerra
NYPD 52nd Precinct, Mosholu Parkway, Norwood, The Bronx Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

52nd Police Precinct Station House

52nd Police Precinct Station House
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

52nd Police Precinct Station House

52nd Police Precinct Station House
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

52nd Precinct

52nd Precinct
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

NYPD 52nd Precinct

NYPD 52nd Precinct
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

52nd Police Precinct Station House

52nd Police Precinct Station House
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

52nd Police Precinct Station House

52nd Police Precinct Station House
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

52nd Police Precinct Station House

52nd Police Precinct Station House
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

52nd Police Precinct Station House

52nd Police Precinct Station House
Made by Emilio Guerra
Moshulu Parkway and Webster Avenue, Bedford Park, Bronx Located on Webster Avenue at the junction of Bronx Park and Mosholu Parkway the picturesque silhouette of the 52nd Police Precinct Station House is visible from the New York Botanical Garden as well as from the Parkway and the Harlem division of the Penn Central Railroad. The 52nd Precinct (known as the 41st Precinct at the time of its construction in 1904-06) serves the Norwood and Bedford Park sections of the Bronx. This area, which formed a portion of Phillipsburgh Manor during the 18th century, was part of Westchester County until 1874, when it was annexed by New York City, together with the part of the present borough lying west of the Bronx River. The eastern section was added in 1895, and in 1898 the Bronx became one of the five boroughs of the consolidated City of New York. The ensuing rapid growth in population which reached a peak around 1905. created an urgent need for expanded police protection. The city government responded with a precinct house that was both aesthetically pleasing and functional. Stoughton & Stoughton, one of the city's more prominent architectural firms, was awarded the design commission. In contrast to the massive, classical grandeur of their well-known Soldier's and Sailor's Monument on Manhattan's Riverside Drive, the architects chose for the Precinct House the more romantic elements of the neo--Italian Renaissance style. The choice was particularly appropriate to what was at the time a quasi-rural setting and what is still a remarkably open area of the city. The 52nd Police Precinct Station House is a three-storv red brick structure, approximately fifty by ei.ghtv feet in size. The south facade is dominated by a centrally located twenty-one foot square clock tower with boldly projecting eaves and triple openings beneath — recalling a Tuscan villa. The upper portion of this tower is accented on its three free sides by large polychrome terra cotta clock faces. Each clock face is set in a central recessed arch and protected by a little pitched roof supported on wooden brackets. These are painted a deep green, as are all the other roof brackets and overhanging eaves. The lower recessed portions of the clock tower are filled with paired windows and terra-cotta plaques. Similar terra-cotta plaques arc used between the second and third story windows or. the southern and western facades of the building. Added interest is provided by the diaper patterned brickwork on the upper floor of all but the northern facade. The walls of the ground floor are laid in Flemish bond and are separated from the upper section by a stone bandcourse which runs all around the building below the second story windows. On the southern and western facades of the ground floor, round-arched windows are set within rectangular frames, with cobalt-blue tiles filling the spandrels. - From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report



Nearest places of interest:

Frisch Field
MNRR Botanical Garden Station
Mertz Library
Bronx Park
  Ps 168
French Charlie's
FDNY - Engine 79 / Ladder 37 / Battalion 27
Mosholu Parkway

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