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2 Federal Reserve Plaza (33 Maiden Lane)

the 2 Federal Reserve Plaza (33 Maiden Lane) is part of Financial District .

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63 Nassau Street Building

63 Nassau Street Building
Made by Emilio Guerra
Financial District, Manhattan The 5-story, Italianate style cast-iron front facade on the building at No. 63 Nassau Street was almost certainly produced c. 1857-59 by James Bogardus, the pioneer of cast iron architecture in America, making it an extremely rare extant example of his work it is one of only five known Bogardus buildings in the U.S. (four in New York City). It is also one of the oldest surviving cast-ironfronted buildings in the city, and one of the very few located in Lower Manhattan, the oldest part of the city and its original financial center. This was a remodeling of a c. 1844 structure, occupied by Thomas Thomas, kitchen tinware manufacturer (on this site since 1827), and constructed by his son Augustus Thomas. Following the fathers death in 1856, the new iron facade was evidently commissioned as a speculative venture to capitalize on the commercial changes in the area around Maiden Lane, including Nassau Street, which was being transformed into a major jewelry district. Augustus Thomas was a business associate of William V. Curtis (owner of this property in 1856-60) in a silkgoods import firm which was then located in the Milhau Pharmacy Building, Bogardus first iron-front commission (1848) one block away at No. 183 Broadway. Thomas and Curtis thus had first-hand knowledge of Bogardus work and cast-iron-fronted buildings. The attribution of this facade to Bogardus was originally made by Margot Gayle, a founder of the Friends of Cast Iron Architecture and co-author of the definitive monograph on Bogardus, based primarily on a signature characteristic known only to buildings definitely linked to Bogardus, namely bas-relief medallions of George Washington and Benjamin Franklin (only the two of Franklin survive today) found on the third story. This attribution is made more conclusive by the connection between Thomas, Curtis, and Bogardus first commission. The building was owned from 1860 to 1946 by Julien Gauton, a French-born bootmaker, and his heirs in the Carroll family. Many of the tenants, through the 1950s, have been associated with the watch and jewelry trades. The elegant and finely detailed design originally featured (the ground story was first altered in 1919) superimposed 2-and 3-story arcades formed by elongated fluted Corinthian columns (most of the capitals leaves are now missing), rope moldings, arches with faceted keystones, and foliate spandrels. The facade is terminated by a widely-projecting, modillioned foliate cornice supported by a corbel table. It is an early and significant surviving commercial building dating from the 1840s-50s, when the jewelry district was first created in the vicinity of Maiden Lane. Based on surviving historic evidence, the 5-story, cast-iron front facade on the building at No. 63 Nassau Street was almost certainly produced by James Bogardus c. 1857-59 as a remodeling of an earlier structure. It was evidently commissioned by the family long associated with the site as its place of business, as a speculative venture to capitalize on the commercial changes in the area, which was largely being transformed into the jewelry district. The need at that time for new commercial buildings to house jewelry firms was increased by the effects of the 1855 Maiden Lane fire. Beginning in 1827, Thomas Thomas had a kitchen furniture (including grates and fenders) warehouse business at No. 63-65 Nassau Street; he had been listed in city directories as early as 1816 in kitchen furniture at No. 31 Nassau Street. From about 1833 to 1837, he was a partner with his son, Cornelius W. Thomas, in the firm of T[homas]. Thomas & Son. During the same period (c. 1834-37), his other son, Augustus Thomas, was associated with the jewelry trade, listed as a manufacturer of thimbles, spectacles, and silver pencil cases at No. 62 Nassau Street. From 1838 to 1847, Augustus Thomas joined his father in T. Thomas & Son. According to property conveyance records and tax assessments, Augustus Thomas entered into a party wall agreement in 1844 with the new owner of No. 65 Nassau Street, and constructed a new building at No. 63 (on a single lot). This building continued to be used until 1856 by T. Thomas & Son (T. Thomas & Co. after 1853). An advertisement in 1849 listed the firm as manufacturers of Block Tin Ware of every variety, brass, iron, wire & bronzed fenders, andirons, shovels & tongs, Suitable to the Southern and Western Markets. Hotels and Steamboats fitted out with Copper Dishes, Stands and Covers, Urns, &c., of every size. Thomas Thomas died in 1856, leaving a wife and a large family of heirs from his eight children and five step-children. Augustus Thomas served as an executor of his fathers estate, along with a stepbrother, Richard J. Larcombe, then a partner in Larcombe, [William S.] Hicks & [Henry] Mitchell, manufacturers of gold and silver pencil and pen cases at No. 20 Maiden Lane in 1852-57.18 Augustus Thomas worked in the silkgoods import business after 1847, briefly (c. 1850-52) with his brother in the firm of C.W. & A. Thomas, then afterwards in A[ugustus]. Thomas & Co. An associate in the firm after 1854 was William V. Curtis. In 1856-58, the business address of A. Thomas & Co. was No. 183 Broadway the Milhau Pharmacy Building that was James Bogardus first iron-front commission in 1848 located just one block away from No. 63 Nassau Street. An 1856 rendering of the Milhau building displays the signage A. Thomas & Co. Importers of Silks, Ribbons, Flowers, Feathers, &c.19 Thus, Thomas and Curtis had first-hand knowledge of Bogardus work and cast-iron-fronted buildings. Augustus Thomas and his wife, Catherine A., transferred the No. 63 Nassau Street property to Curtis in July 1856, for $28,750 (the transaction was not officially recorded until February 1859, and Thomas was continually listed in the citys tax assessments for the property from 1846 to 1860). The new iron facade on No. 63 was evidently completed by the time of the recorded transfer. That this was a remodeling at the time, rather than a completely new building, is indicated by the tax assessments: the structure was already listed as 5-1/2 stories in 1858 (the first year that the number of stories were indicated), and though there is some variation in actual assessment ($18,000 in 1854-56; $20,000 in 1857-61; and $18,000 in 1862-65), the proportionate assessment (compared to the adjacent property at No. 65-67) is higher after 1858. William V. Curtis, and his wife, Amy C., sold the property for $24,000 in April 1860 to Julien Gauton (c. 1820-1871), a French-born bootmaker, whose business was located a block away at No. 89 Nassau Street, and Gauton then sold three lots in midtown to Curtis for $21,700. If the Thomas family, and/or Curtis, intended No. 63 Nassau Street as a long-term speculative venture, the significant economic realities of the Panic of 1857, the impending Civil War, and the accompanying slowdowns in the jewelry trade, intervened, and undoubtedly influenced the decision on ownership. Gauton, active with the French Benevolent Society (organized in 1809 to provide French immigrants with medical, financial, food, clothing and temporary housing assistance), provides an intriguing link in a French immigrant social nexus associated with this building, that also included Dr. Milhau and many of the earliest tenants. The ownership of No. 63 Nassau Street remained in the family of Gauton and his heirs from 1860 to 1946. Julien Gautons will left his real estate (which also included properties in Brooklyn, College Point, Long Island, and three houses at 310-314 East 38th Street), with authorization to sell or lease, to his executors his second wife, Maria Louise Gauton (died 1889), and daughter, Maria Gauton (Mrs. Francis P.) Carroll in order to provide for their annuities. A codicil to the will left an additional annuity to a sister, Josephine Thomas, which indicates a probable familial connection to Thomas and Augustus Thomas. The property was inherited from Maria Gauton Carroll by her six children (and their heirs). The facade of No. 63 Nassau Street has long been attributed to James Bogardus based on the pioneering research of Margot Gayle, a founder of the Friends of Cast Iron Architecture. She included the building in her earlier work, with Edmund V. Gillon, Jr., Cast-Iron Architecture in New York: A Photographic Survey (1974), as well as in the later, definitive monograph on the life and career of James Bogardus, with her daughter, Carol Gayle, Cast Iron Architecture in America: The Significance of James Bogardus (1998). Since the building lacks a founders plate bearing Bogardus name (the ground story was altered in 1919), and no written evidence has come to light explicitly tying it to Bogardus, their attribution was based primarily on a characteristic known only to buildings by Bogardus, namely the four bas-relief medallions of George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, framed by wreaths, originally found on the bases of the columns on the third story (only the two of Franklin survive today). Identical medallions were also found on four other buildings (now all demolished), known definitely to have been produced by Bogardus: the Baltimore Sun Iron Building (1850-51); Harper & Bros. Printing House (1854-55); Blunt & Syms Building (1854-55); and Swain Building (1857-58). These medallions comprise a signature of the work of Bogardus, one that he undoubtedly had the rights to. The now-known direct connection between Augustus Thomas, William V. Curtis, and Bogardus Milhau Pharmacy Building further corroborates the Gayles attribution. As a building associated with the emerging jewelry district, No. 63 Nassau Street has other interesting connections, in the facts that Bogardus early on was a watch and clock maker and inventor, and that Augustus Thomas and Richard Larcombe both had early jewelry trade associations. Finally, there is the circumstance of a cast-iron front being placed on a building whose site had for three decades been employed by the same family metalwork firm. The elegant and finely detailed Italianate style design of No. 63 Nassau Street features what was (originally prior to the ground-story alteration) a composition of superimposed arcades, with a 2-story arcade capped by an intermediate modillioned cornice, surmounted by a 3-story arcade which is terminated by a widely-projecting, modillioned foliate cornice supported by a corbel table. The arcades are formed by elongated fluted Corinthian columns (most of the capitals leaves are now missing), rope moldings, molded arches with faceted keystones, and foliate spandrels. Several of these elements are stylistically similar to Bogardus slightly later Kitchen, Montross & Wilcox Store (1860-61), 85 Leonard Street, including the superimposed arcade composition, monumental fluted columns, faceted keystones, rope moldings, and foliate spandrels. No. 63 Nassau Street is also part of a significant, small group of extant early cast-iron-fronted buildings of so-called sperm candle design (having 2- to 3-story arcades supported by thin columns resembling sperm whale oil candles) that includes such examples as No. 85 Leonard Street and Condict Store (1861, John Kellum & Son), 55 White Street.21 Though an architect has not been found in connection with No. 63 Nassau Street, the use of both arcades and a corbel table below the cornice bears a similarity to the work of John Kellum & Son in their Tefft, Weller & Co. Store (1859-60; demolished), 320-330 Broadway; No. 502-504 Broadway (1860);22 and the Condict Store. Today, No. 63 Nassau Street survives as an extremely rare surviving example of the work of the pioneer of cast iron architecture in America, James Bogardus one of only five known buildings by Bogardus in the U.S. (four in New York City). It is, as well, one of the oldest surviving cast-iron-fronted buildings in New York City, and one of the very few located in Lower Manhattan, the oldest part of the city and its original financial center. Furthermore, it is an early and significant surviving commercial building dating from the 1840s-50s, when a major commercial jewelry district was first being created on Maiden Lane and adjacent streets, including Nassau Street. - From the 1988 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

NYC: John Street United Methodist Church

NYC: John Street United Methodist Church
Made by wallyg
The John Street United Methodist Church, at 44 John Street, is home to the oldest Methodist Congregation in America, founded in 1766 as the Wesleyan Society of America. The story of the John Street Church begins in Ireland, where Philip Embury, his wife, his cousin, Barbara Ruckle Heck, and her husband were converted to Methodism. Philip Embury became one of Wesley's local preachers. In 1760, a number of Irish Methodists, including the Emburys and the Hecks, immigrated to New York City. In October 1766, Philip Embury began holding regular services in his home. The services soon outgrew the Embury home, and the Methodist Society began meeting in rented facilities; first on Barrack Street and then on Horse and Cart (now William) Street. Embury was soon joined in the pulpit by Captain Thomas Webb, a British officer and a licensed Methodist lay preacher. By 1768, the congregation had outgrown the rigging loft, and on March 30, 1768, two lots on nearby John Street were purchased. The first building erected on this site was called Wesley Chapel and was dedicated on October 30, 1768. The Hecks and Emburys left New York in 1770, but the work at John Street continued. Francis Asbury preached there numerous times, and early General Conferences held their sessions in the chapel. A slave named Peter Williams was one of many African American members of Philip Embury's society. He became sexton of Wesley Chapel and, with James Varick and others, formed what later became the Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. In 1817 the chapel was torn down to make way for a larger structure, dedicated in 1818. A third (and smaller) edifice was erected in 1841 and is still in use today. The well-proportioned Georgian-inspired building with a brownstone facade is attributed to Charles Wright. The John Street Methodist Church was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1965. National Register #73001219 (1973)

Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Made by Emilio Guerra
Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States This enormous building occupies an entire city block; it is fourteen stories high and has five stories below grade. The remarkable stone exterior is reminiscent of an early Italianate Renaissance palace with the horizontal and vertical joints of the stones deeply grooved (rusticated). The wrought iron window grilles and lanterns represent some of the finest craftsmanship of this Century. The importance of the Federal Reserve Bank Building lies in its vast size, fortress-like appearance, fine proportions and in the superb quality of its construction. It set a precedent for many later banks which were influenced by its design. This bank is housed in a building worthy of its pre-eminent position in the financial life of New York City and of the entire country. The question has been raised by the owner as to whether this building should be designated by New York City as a Landmark. The Commission is cognizant of the jurisdictional question. Nevertheless, it is very important for the Government of New York City to state officially its deep concern that this building be preserved. There should be no uncertainty about this. The Commission would be negligent if it failed to act in this situation. At some time in the future this building may be in jeopardy. Our designation will be especially helpful in alerting New York City's elected representatives in Washington of the importance of saving the building. At present, the Commission's specialists can be of service in providing advice so that the architectural integrity of this building is maintained. Indeed a fine relationship already exists with many local representatives of the Federal Government. - From the 1965 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

NYC: John Street United Methodist Church - Welsey Chapel on John Street

NYC: John Street United Methodist Church - Welsey Chapel on John Street
Made by wallyg
A replica of Joseph Beekman Smith's View of John Street, 1768, completed in the early 1990's, adorns the east wall of the courtyard. The original, painted in 1768, is on display in the church's museum. The large building in the middle of the block is the Wesley Chapel, which was designed and built by Philip Embury and was the first Methodist Episcopal Church in America. Peter Williams, Captain Webb and Embury are depicted standing in front of the building.

New York - Maiden Lane Debris

New York - Maiden Lane Debris
Made by picture_addicted
Even 2.5 months after the attacks of 9/11, the debris from the WTC was lying on the closer surronding streets and shops - Auch 2,5 Monate nach den Anschlägen vom 11.09.2001 lag die Asche und Trümmerstaub des WTC auf den umliegenden Straßen und Gebäuden

To the Light and Beyond

To the Light and Beyond
Made by John Fraissinet
StreetObservations.com web | blog

Jim Brady's Restaurant

Jim Brady's Restaurant
Made by The B@man
That's Tim Brady standing in front of it. His dad's called Jim Brady. Tim didn't know this place was there until we walked past it.

Manhattan Bridge Tilt-Shift

Manhattan Bridge Tilt-Shift
Made by jferzoco
This is an image of the Manhattan Bridge from the Chase Building, altered using a Tilt-Shift process in Photoshop.

Manhattan... With a Twist

Manhattan... With a Twist
Made by MilanoPix
(Large Version)

Manhattan, New York, NYC

Manhattan, New York, NYC
Made by flickr4jazz
Historical marker for the location of the first printing press in the New World.

Steam Light

Steam Light
Made by John Fraissinet
A sunlit cloud of steam settles behind a New York City street lamp.

Nassau Street, NYC

Nassau Street, NYC
Made by dgaw2003
Nassau Street in New York City's Financial District, October 11, 2006

110619-0003

110619-0003
Made by gaetanku
American International Building et Home Insurance Plaza New york

elevator

elevator
Made by Brandi!
me and marja ride an elevator in her summer apt in manhattan...

NYPD @ Wall St.

NYPD @ Wall St.
Made by craigalin
Looks a little like Law and Order, doesn't it? :)

Hair Cut

Hair Cut
Made by John Fraissinet
Street salon window scene taken from the street.

Seagram Building

Seagram Building
Made by Rebel Scum!
The Seagram Building by Mies Van Der Rohe.

Manhattan, New York, NYC

Manhattan, New York, NYC
Made by flickr4jazz
Europeans braving the weather.

Occupy Wall Street - October 13, 2011

Occupy Wall Street - October 13, 2011
Made by Union College Concordiensis
Erica Fugger | Concordiensis

Old Cash Register

Old Cash Register
Made by The B@man
In Jim Brady's Restaurant.



Nearest places of interest:

New York Federal Reserve Building
Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York Building
John Street Methodist Church
Home Insurance Plaza
  72 Nassau Street
41 John Street
25 Maiden Lane
21 Maiden Lane

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